You are expected to attend this lecture strand as part of your English programme




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ENGL 201: THE THEORY AND PRACTICE OF CRITICISM (COMPULSORY)


Second year English Literature students should also note the weekly ENGL 201 Practical Lecture Strand, ‘Close Reading’, which focuses on creative and critical interfaces and has been designed for all students majoring in the Department. You are expected to attend this lecture strand as part of your English programme.


Course Aims and Objectives

ENGL 201 is the core course in English at Lancaster. It addresses fundamental questions about the status, value, and interpretation of texts: What is literature? Why are some literary and cultural texts deemed to be exceptionally valuable? What are the best ways of reading these texts? 201 poses these questions in the context of recent debates about language, politics, gender, selfhood, culture and national identity. Students on 201 will discover the major critical concepts and debates of recent years and assess their strengths and limitations as models of literary interpretation. A couple of novels will be used to exemplify, explore and re-think these concepts. The course will consider the ways in which critical theory has challenged traditional assumptions about literature and criticism; it will examine the debates that have opened up between different theoretical schools of thought; and it will enable students to deploy theoretical terms and concepts in their own acts of reading. Its overall aim is to make students more rigorous, sophisticated and inventive in their readings of literary and cultural texts.


Assessment:

1 x 1,500-word essay (20%); 1 x group oral presentation (30%); 1 x 4,000-word project (50%). This course does not use the ‘supplementary evidence’ system.


Submission Deadlines:

Essay = by 12 noon on Thursday of Week 8/Term 1

Group presentations = Term 2, Weeks 7-10

Project = 12 noon, Thursday of Week 2/Term 3


Contact:

Weekly seminars (50 minutes beginning week 1) plus 21 lectures.


Learning Outcomes:

You should

  • have developed a wide knowledge of the various contemporary approaches to literary interpretation

  • be able to participate knowledgeably in debates over the value and purpose of criticism

  • be familiar with the differences between traditional and theoretical assumptions about literature

  • be familiar with the debates between different theoretical schools of thought

  • be able to deploy theoretical ideas and vocabulary as part of the detailed analysis of literary texts

  • have become more sophisticated and discerning in your use of secondary material

  • have developed your skills of written and oral communication


Set Texts:

Julie Rivkin and Michael Ryan (eds) Literary Theory: An Anthology 2nd edition (Oxford: Blackwell, 2004) PLEASE NOTE: You must buy the second edition of this text.


Term 1: Robert Louis Stevenson, Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde (Penguin or OUP World’s Classics editions are recommended, but any affordable paperback edition will do.)


Term 2: J.G. Ballard, High-Rise (any edition will do)


IMPORTANT: You are strongly encouraged to read one or two introductions to literary theory before beginning this course so please see the course LUVLE site now!


Lecturers: AHB = Dr Arthur Bradley; AWT = Dr Andrew Tate; BB= Dr Brian Baker; CLS = Dr Catherine Spooner; LCM= Dr Lindsey Moore; LOB = Dr Liz Oakley-Brown; LP= Prof Lynne Pearce; MJG= Dr Michael Greaney; SJS = Prof John Schad.


English Literature students should note that the weekly lecture strand ENGL 201 (Practical) has been designed to enhance key close reading skills at second-year level. You are expected to attend this lecture strand as part of your English programme.


ENGL 201: THE THEORY AND PRACTICE OF CRITICISM (COMPULSORY)

Lecture Time and Venue (Term 1): Monday 4pm – 5pm, Bowland Main Lecture Theatre

Lecture Time and Venue (Term 2): Monday 5pm – 6pm, Faraday Lecture Theatre

Course Convenors: Prof John Schad (Term 1), Dr Michael Greaney (Terms 2 and 3)

Lecture / Seminar Programme


Term 1

Week

Lecture

Lecturer

Seminar

1

In Theory: An Introduction

SJS

Please see course LUVLE site for weekly readings

2

Signs (Saussure and Barthes)

AHB




3

Selves (Freud)

LCM




4

Powers (Marx etc)

BB




5

Tramps: Stevenson, Jekyll and Hyde

SJS




6

INDEPENDENT STUDY WEEK – NO LECTURE / SEMINAR

7

Desires (Lacan)

SJS




8

Genders (Feminism)

LCM




9

Ghosts (Derrida)

SJS




10

Margins (Postcolonialism)

LCM





Term 2

Week

Lecture

Lecturer

Seminar

1

Prisons (Foucault)

MJG

Please see course LUVLE site for weekly readings

2

Voices (Bakhtin)

CLS




3

Ends (Postmodernism)

AWT




4

Wires (Posthumanism)

AHB




5

Towers: Ballard, High-Rise

MJG




6

INDEPENDENT STUDY WEEK – NO LECTURE / SEMINAR

7

Queer

LP




8

Bodies

LOB




9

Others

AHB




10

They Think it (is) All Over: 201 Project

MJG





Term 3

Week

Lecture

Lecturer

Seminar

1

Final Year Enrolment: Introduction

LCM

No Seminar

2

Careers Talk

E. Davies

No Seminar

3

ENGL 301 Dissertation: Introduction

LCM

No Seminar



ENGL 201 PRACTICAL: CLOSE READING SKILLS


Course Aims and Objectives:

ENGL 201 (Practical) is a lecture strand designed for all students in the second year of undergraduate programmes run by the Department of English and Creative Writing (English Literature; English Literature with Creative Writing; English Literature, Creative Writing and Practice). It has been designed to complement ENGL 201 (The Theory and Practice of Criticism) and to encourage the development of more “traditional” skills of analysis and interpretation. It is as important to be able to read carefully, sensitively and with alertness to the language of literary texts as it is to be able to apply theoretical ideas to them. The course will begin with a clear explanation of and rationale for the practice of “close reading” before developing a range of skills in response to texts and visual media over the course of the year. The lecture programme will be delivered by lecturers within the Department applying their powers of analysis to the close reading of relevant genres or forms.


Assessment:

There is no assessment attached to this lecture strand. However, exercises are provided on LUVLE to enable you to develop your close reading skills independently.


Contact:

Weekly lectures of 50 minutes, beginning in Week 1, Term 1.


Learning Outcomes:

By the end of the course you will have:


  • been provided with good models of ‘close reading’ in lectures which can inform your own practice

  • acquired different techniques of analysis for a wide range of generic forms and historical periods

  • learned how to read texts well: sensitively, with careful attention to detail and to nuances and ambiguities of language, form and meaning

  • Begun to learn to bring together close analysis and theoretical approaches

  • Developed your own skills independently through follow-up activities



Set Texts:

An annotated bibliography is provided on LUVLE. There are no set texts for this course.


Lecturers: AWT = Dr Andrew Tate; BB = Dr Brian Baker; CLS = Dr Catherine Spooner; GG = Dr George Green; HF = Dr Helen Farish; JS = Dr Jayne Steel; KAH = Prof Keith Hanley; KLE = Dr Kamilla Elliott; LCM = Dr Lindsey Moore; LOB = Dr Liz Oakley-Brown; LP = Prof Lynne Pearce; MJG = Dr Michael Greaney; RA = Dr Robert Appelbaum; SCB = Dr Sally Bushell; SJJB = Prof Simon Bainbridge; SJS = Prof John Schad; TP: Mr Tony Pinkney.


ENGL 201 (PRACTICAL): CLOSE READING

Lecture Time and Venue: Wednesday 11am – 12pm, Bowland Main Lecture Theatre

Course Convenor: Prof Keith Hanley (Term 1); Dr Sally Bushell (Terms 2 and 3)


Lecture Programme


Term 1

Week

Lecture

Lecturer

1

What is Close Reading?

KAH

2

Prose 1: Reading Prose

RA

3

Prose 2: Biblical Prose and Poetry

KAH

4

Prose 3: The Realist Novel

SM

5

Prose 4: Contemporary Prose

BB

6

INDEPENDENT STUDY WEEK – NO LECTURE




7

Close Reading Your Own Work 1

LCM

8

Prose 5: Postcolonial Prose

LCM

9

Drama 1: Dramatic Texts and Subtexts

RA

10

Drama 2: Absurdist Drama

SJS


Term 2

Week

Lecture

Lecturer

1

Combining Theory and Close Reading

MJG

2

Poetry 1: Oral Poetry and the Early Ballad

LOB

3

Poetry 2: Epic Conventions

GG

4

Poetry 3: Romantic Experimentations

SJJB

5

Poetry 4: Victorian Poetry

TBC

6

INDEPENDENT STUDY WEEK – NO LECTURE




7

Close Reading Your Own Work 2

LP

8

Poetry 5: The Modernist Poem

AWT

9

Poetry 6: Contemporary Poetry

HF

10

Film 1: Close Reading Film

JS


Term 3

Week

Lecture

Lecturer

1

Film 2: Reading Adaptations

KLE

2

Television: Close Reading TV

CLS



ENGL 202: RENAISSANCE TO RESTORATION: ENGLISH LITERATURE 1580-1688


Course Aims and Objectives:

As the seventeenth century opened, a new monarch came to power, a new generation of writers came into prominence, and England’s position in the world rapidly changed; new peace treaties were about to be signed, new colonial ventures were about to be inaugurated, and, after a period of depression, a new era of economic expansion was setting in. This was still very much the world of the Renaissance, but before long something new would take its place. On the Continent, the period is often identified as the era of ‘the Baroque’, and that term could also be applied, to some extent, to the social and cultural life of seventeenth-century Britain. But there were fundamental differences too, for this would eventually be a century of revolution in the British Isles, as well as a century capped by a ‘Restoration’ which in fact restored very little. Whatever happened on the Continent, English culture saw upheavals in politics that were accompanied by deep shifts in social life—in the role of women in public affairs, in sexual expression, in religious practices, in science and medicine, and many other areas of social life that were addressed in the literature of the period.


This course will focus on the literature of change in the seventeenth century, from the brilliant and edgy theatre of the likes of Ben Jonson and Thomas Middleton to the prose writings of revolutionaries like John Milton and monarchist libertines like Aphra Behn. The first half of this course will take us through to the 1630s, when the Stuart monarchy was at the height of its power, and many of the most ‘classic’ of English writers thrived: Sir Francis Bacon, John Donne, Ben Jonson. The second half will focus on the period of revolution and Restoration, and will include glances at religious controversy, political pamphleteering, and the making of modern London. The figure of John Milton, whose works span the Caroline 1630s, the revolutionary years, and the Restoration, will loom large throughout.


Our readings will mainly be focused on themes designed to provide us with ingress into the literature, culture and historical vitality of the period—‘truth’, ‘love’, ‘the country house’ ‘revolution and class’, ‘engendering the city’. We will be reading cross-sections from works by many authors to explore these themes from as many angles as possible. We will explore the similarities, the lines of consensus, of shared languages and beliefs, between the different writers, but we will also be keen to observe and analyse differences.


Assessment:

1 x in-class test (10% supplementary evidence); 1 x 2,000-word essay (30% supplementary evidence); 1 x 2.5 hours final examination (60%)


Submission Deadlines:

In-class test = Lecture session, Week 10/Term 1

Essay = 12 noon, Thursday Week 10/Term 2


Set texts:


Term 1

Alan Rudrum et al (eds), The Broadview Anthology of Seventeenth Century Verse and Prose (Broadview Press)

Francis Bacon, New Atlantis (Dodo Press)

Ben Jonson, The Alchemist (New Mermaids)

Thomas Middleton, Women Beware Women (Revels Student Editions)


Term 2

In addition to the Broadview Anthology, which we will continue to use:

John Milton, Paradise Lost, ed. John Leonard (Penguin)  

William Wycherley, The Country Wife (New Mermaids)  

Margaret Cavendish, The Blazing World and Other Writings (Penguin)

Aphra Behn, Oroonoko and Other Writings, ed. Paul Salzman (Oxford Paperbacks)

Elizabeth Polwhele, The Frolicks (available to purchase from the Part II Office)

For further reading, see the course LUVLE site.


See the LUVLE site on a weekly basis for seminar questions.


Lecturers: RA = Dr Robert Appelbaum; JD = Dr Jessica Dyson; AGF = Prof Alison Findlay; HH = Dr Hilary Hinds


English Literature students should note that the weekly lecture strand ENGL 201 (Practical) has been designed to enhance key close reading skills at second-year level. You are expected to attend this lecture strand as part of your English programme.


ENGL 202: RENAISSANCE TO RESTORATION: ENGLISH LITERATURE 1580-1688

Lecture Time and Venue: Thursday 2pm – 3pm, Faraday Lecture Theatre

Course Convenors: Dr Hilary Hinds


Lecture / Seminar Programme

Term 1


Week

Lecture / Seminar

Lecturer

1

Introduction to the Course.

What is Truth? Francis Bacon, ‘Of Truth’, Mary Herbert, ‘Si Vere Utique’; John Donne, ‘Holy Sonnet X’; Nicholas Breton, ‘An Atheist’; Thomas Sprat, History of the Royal Society

RA

2

What is Love? John Donne, ‘The Apparition’, ‘The Good Morrow’, ‘Love’s Alchemy’, ‘The Anniversary’, ‘Air and Angels’, ‘The Relic’, Elegies XVIII (‘Love’s Progress’) and XIX (‘Going to Bed’); Lady Mary Wroth, Crown of Sonnets (from Pamphilia to Amphilanthus)

HH

3

The New Atlantis. Francis Bacon, New Atlantis*; Bacon, ‘Of Empire’; ‘Of the Greatness of Kingdoms’

RA

4

Country Houses. Ben Jonson. ‘Of Penshurst’; Aemilia Lanyer, ‘To Cooke-ham’; Robert Herrick, ‘The Hock-cart’

HH

5

Magic and the City. Ben Jonson, The Alchemist

JD

6

INDEPENDENT STUDY WEEK – NO LECTURE / SEMINAR




7

Sex and the City. Thomas Middleton, Women Beware Women*

JD

8

Poetry and Faith. John Donne, Holy Sonnets (selection in Broadview); ‘Good Friday 1613’, ‘A Hymn to God the Father’; George Herbert, Jordan poems, ‘Prayer (I)’, ‘Church Monuments’, ‘The Pulley’, ‘The Pilgrimage’, ‘Paradise’, ‘Love (III)’; John Milton, ‘Of Christ’s Nativity’.

HH

9

The Cavaliers. Robert Herrick, ‘The Argument of his Book’, ‘When he would have’, ‘The Difference’, ‘Upon the Loss’, ‘Delight in Disorder’, ‘Corinna’s Going A Maying’, ‘To live merrily’, ‘To the Virgins’, ‘Prayer to Ben Jonson’, ‘The Bad Season’, ‘His Return to London’, ‘Upon Julia’s Clothes’, ‘A Thanksgiving’; Thomas Carew, ‘A Rapture’, ‘To Ben Jonson’, An Elegy Upon the Death’, ‘To A Lady’; Richard Lovelace, ‘To Lucasta, Going to the Wars’, ‘The Grasshopper’, ‘To Lucasta, From Prison’, ‘To Althea, From Prison’; Katherine Philips, Orinda Poems

JD

10

Lecture: IN-CLASS TEST

Seminar: Trouble on the Way. Thomas Carew, ‘To Saxham’, William Bradford, ‘Of Plymouth Plantation’, Milton, ‘Lycidas’





Term 2


Week

Lecture / Seminar

Lecturer

1

Revolution, Religion and Speech. Milton, Aeropagitica; Margaret Fell, Women’s Speaking Justified; Thomas Edwards, ‘Of Preaching’, from Gangraena

HH

2

Revolution, Religion and Class. John Denham, ‘Cooper’s Hill’; Gerard Winstanley, A Declaration, ‘The Digger’s Song’, Andrew Marvell, ‘An Horatian Ode’ and the Mower Poems

JD

3

The Metaphysics of Rebellion. Paradise Lost I-II*

JD

4

Writing the Self. John Bunyan, Grace Abounding to the Chief of Sinners; Samuel Pepys, Diary; John Evelyn, Diary

HH

5

After the War: Love, Chastity and Gender. Margaret Cavendish, Assaulted and Pursued Chastity*, Blazing World* (read first few pages), ‘The Poetess’s Hasty Resolution’; ‘I Language Want’; The Philosophical and Political Opinions: ‘To the Two Universities’

HH

6

INDEPENDENT STUDY WEEK – NO LECTURE / SEMINAR




7

Paradise and Heaven. Paradise Lost III-V*

JD

8

The History of Humankind. Paradise Lost VI-XII

HH

9

After the Fire: Engendering the City. William Wycherley, The Country Wife; Elizabeth Polwhele, The Frolicks

AGF

10

Empire and Slavery. Aphra Behn, Oroonoko

HH

11

Revision lecture

HH



ENGL 203: VICTORIAN LITERATURE


Course Aims and Objectives:

Between 1830 and 1900 Britain changed radically and rapidly. Industrialisation and urbanisation transformed economic and social conditions and changed ideas about politics, class, and gender roles. Scientific developments appeared to call into question long-established beliefs about God and human nature. Victorian literature is in large part a response to these changes. This course introduces a wide range of Victorian literature (poetry, novels, short stories, prose essays, drama and children’s literature) and of rhetorical modes (sensational, sentimental, comic, tragic, Gothic, nonsensical, polemical, didactic) addressing a variety of issues, including politics, class, economic conditions, social organisation, gender, sexuality, childhood, race, colonialism, empire, war, nation, rural and urban living, science, religion, madness, the supernatural, Victorian views of the historical and personal pasts and Victorian visions of the future.


Assessment:

1 x in-class test (10% supplementary evidence); 1 x 2,000-word essay (30% supplementary evidence); 1 x 2.5 hours final examination (60%)


Submission Deadlines:

In-class test = during lecture session, Week 10/Term 1

Essay = by 12 noon, Thursday Week 10/Term 2


Contact:

1 lecture, 1 seminar per week.


Learning Outcomes

By the end of the course, successful students will have developed skills in the close analysis of literary texts and the development of critical argumentation, learned to use secondary sources for essays and exams, and begun to grasp the complex relationships between literary works and their historical contexts.


Set Texts:

T.J. Collins & V.J. Rundle (eds), The Broadview Anthology of Victorian Poetry and Poetic Theory: Concise Edition.

Charlotte Bronte, Jane Eyre

Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

Mary Braddon, Lady Audley’s Secret

Lewis Carroll, Through the Looking Glass, and What Alice Found There

Thomas Hardy, The Return of the Native

Roger Luckhurst (ed.), Late Victorian Gothic Tales

William Morris, News From Nowhere


For further reading, including texts by women travel writers, see the course LUVLE site.


Lecturers: AWT = Dr Andrew Tate; CLS = Dr Catherine Spooner; KAH = Professor Keith Hanley; KLE = Dr Kamilla Elliott; SJS = Prof John Schad; TP = Mr Tony Pinkney; SM = Dr Simon Marsden.


English Literature students should note that the weekly lecture strand ENGL 201 (Practical) has been designed to enhance key close reading skills at second-year level. You are expected to attend this lecture strand as part of your English programme.


ENGL 203: VICTORIAN LITERATURE

Lecture Time and Venue (Term 1): Tuesday 2pm – 3pm, Faraday Lecture Theatre

Lecture Time and Venue (Terms 2 and 3): Tuesday 3pm – 4pm, Bowland Main Lecture Theatre

Course Convenor: Dr Kamilla Elliott (Term 1), Dr Catherine Spooner (Terms 2 and 3)

Lecture / Seminar Programme

Term 1

Week

Lecture

Lecturer

Seminar

1

Course and Period Introduction

KLE

Selected poems from Anthology (see LUVLE)

2

Tennyson

SJS

Poems by Tennyson from Anthology (see LUVLE)

3

Charlotte Bronte, Jane Eyre

KLE

Charlotte Bronte, Jane Eyre

4

Charlotte Bronte, Jane Eyre

SM

Charlotte Bronte, Jane Eyre

5

Robert Browning and Elizabeth Barrett Browning

SJS

Selected poems from Anthology (see LUVLE)

6

INDEPENDENT STUDY WEEK – NO LECTURE / SEMINAR

7

Ruskin and Carlyle

KAH

Readings will be posted on LUVLE

8

Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

SJS

Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

9

Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

KLE

Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

10

IN-CLASS TEST




See instructions from your tutor on LUVLE.


Term 2

Week

Lecture

Lecturer

Seminar

11

The Pre-Raphaelites

CLS

The Pre-Raphaelites: selections from Anthology (see LUVLE)

12

Poetry and Religion

AWT

Selected poems from Anthology (see LUVLE)

13

Mary Elizabeth Braddon, Lady Audley’s Secret

CLS

Mary Elizabeth Braddon, Lady Audley’s Secret

14

Lewis Carroll, Though the Looking Glass

TP

Lewis Carroll, Though the Looking Glass

15

Victorian Women Travel Writers/Victorian Colonialism

LUVLE

Extracts to be provided on LUVLE

16

ESSAY PREPARATION WEEK (RESEARCH AND PLANNING) – NO LECTURE / SEMINAR

17

Thomas Hardy, The Return of the Native

TP

Thomas Hardy, The Return of the Native

18

Thomas Hardy, The Return of the Native

SM

Thomas Hardy, The Return of the Native

19

Late Victorian Gothic Tales

CLS

Selected stories from Late Victorian Gothic Tales

20

William Morris, News from Nowhere

TP

William Morris, News from Nowhere

21

Exam revision tips

SM

Revision seminar


Term 3

Week

Lecture

Lecturer

Seminar

22

No Lecture

-

Revision Seminar



ENGL 204: AMERICAN LITERATURE TO 1900


Course Aims and Objectives:

This course explores how American Literature has evolved from its colonial origins, with particular emphasis on key figures of the nineteenth century. What we call ‘American Literature’ and how we define America and ‘the American experience’ depends on who is writing and to whom. We shall encounter many different voices, many conflicting and contrasting views, a diversity of complex experience and a great range of writing in form and style (don’t expect the poetic and novelistic forms you are used to in British literature). The course will be broadly thematic in its approach, aiming to build up through recurring themes, images, questions and stylistic features, an increasingly complex picture of the literature created mostly by English-speaking Americans.

The seminar programme has been designed to make use of the tremendous range of material offered by the Norton as well as focusing on certain important authors and texts. So sometimes we shall be reading a number of shorter selections on a particular theme, and at other times we’ll spend one or two whole seminars on a single text or writer. The early seminars on the course are meant to introduce a number of important issues which will give you a framework for later texts (their relevance will become increasingly clear), but the texts are also important in their own right though they may seem strange to you. You’re encouraged to use your Norton and read beyond the texts selected for the seminars, especially when writing your essays. Read the headnotes for every author whose work you're asked to read for a seminar.


Assessment:

1 x class test (10% supplementary evidence); 1 x 2,000-word essay (30% supplementary evidence); 1 x 2.5 hours final examination (60%)


Submission deadlines:

In-class test = Lecture Slot Week 9/Term 1

Essay = by 12 noon, Thursday Week 10/Term 2


Contact:

One lecture and one seminar per week.


Learning Outcomes:

You should:

  • have developed a good knowledge of the literature of the period in its various types and genres, an understanding of significant kinds of connection and difference between texts, and a capacity to read these texts closely

  • demonstrate an awareness of certain historical, political, literary and cultural issues of the period as they are reflected in the literary texts

  • develop an understanding of the problems of defining American literature and the contested nature of ‘America’ as a concept

  • have developed independent critical responses and perspectives in general and a capacity to make appropriate use of secondary material such as criticism and theory

  • have developed your existing skills (both oral and written) in the analysis of ideas, presentation of arguments and well-expressed handling of complex issues
Reading List:

We shall be mainly using The Norton Anthology of American Literature, Volumes A and B, Seventh Edition. In addition, you’ll need to have copies of Twain, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, and James, The Turn of the Screw. For an extensive bibliography with recommended secondary reading, please see the course LUVLE site


Lecturers: AWT = Dr Andrew Tate; BB = Dr Brian Baker; DC = Dr David Cooper; AES = Dr Tony Sharpe


English Literature students should note that the weekly lecture strand ENGL 201 (Practical) has been designed to enhance key close reading skills at second-year level. You are expected to attend this lecture strand as part of your English programme.

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