You are expected to attend this lecture strand as part of your English programme




НазваниеYou are expected to attend this lecture strand as part of your English programme
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Primary Texts:


Anand, Mulk Raj. Untouchable (1935).

Desai, Anita. Clear Light of Day (1980).

Ghosh, Amitav. The Shadow Lines (1988).

Mistry, Rohinton. Such a Long Journey (1992).

Narayan, R.K. The English Teacher (1945).

Rao, Raja. Kanthapura (1938).

Roy, Arundhati. The God of Small Things (1997).

Rushdie, Salman. Midnight’s Children (1981).


You are expected to have a copy of each of the primary texts for use in class. Copies of the primary material have been ordered for sale in the campus Waterstones and are also available in the University library.


Secondary Reading: See the ENGL 369 LUVLE site.


Week by Week Programme


Week 1

You should come to the first seminar prepared to discuss:

Handout – Salman Rushdie – on the ENGL 369 LUVLE site.

And

Mulk Raj Anand, Untouchable (1935).


Week 2

Raja Rao, Kanthapura (1938).


Week 3

R. K. Narayan, The English Teacher (1945).


Week 4

Anita Desai, Clear Light of Day (1980).


Week 5

Salman Rushdie, Midnight’s Children (1981).


Week 6

Independent Study Week to prepare the substantial reading involved in the second half of the course: Screening of Earth, dir. Deepa Mehta, in the usual seminar slot.


Week 7

Salman Rushdie, Midnight’s Children (1981) (continued).


Week 8

Amitav Ghosh, The Shadow Lines (1988).


Week 9

Rohinton Mistry, Such A Long Journey (1992).


Week 10

Arundhati Roy, The God of Small Things (1997).


English Literature students should note that the weekly lecture strand E.CW 300 ‘Beyond Undergraduate English’ has been designed for all students majoring in the Department. You are expected to attend this lecture strand as part of your English programme.


ENGL 376: SCHOOLS VOLUNTEERING MODULE (Term 2)

Course Convenor: Dr Hilary Hinds


Course Aims and Objectives:

This module will be run as a partnership between the Department of English and Creative Writing and LUSU Involve (formerly LUVU).  It will help to enhance students’ employability and will be based on LUVU’s Schools Partnership Scheme which supports Lancaster students on 10-week placements in local schools. This will involve classroom observation and assistance, teacher assistance, as well as teaching the class as a whole.  It will give students first-hand experiences of young people’s responses to literary texts, thus adding a dimension to students’ understanding of such texts.  It will allow students to develop academic skills around a special project carried out in the school related to literary texts. It will enable students to develop academic skills around a special project carried out in the school related to literary texts. It will enable students to develop confidence in communicating their subject, as well as an increased awareness of the roles of schools and universities in educational processes. As well as providing students with practical and communication experience, this module is likely to help with career progression, and in particular (though not exclusively) for those interested in pursuing a career in teaching. At the same time, the module will provide teachers with a knowledgeable and enthusiastic assistant who can support and motivate pupils. Opportunities will be available in both the primary and secondary school sector.


Assessment:

Log book of learning progress and development in the classroom environment: 1,500-2,000 words (required but unassessed). End of module project: 4,000 words on an aspect of literary/filmic texts in a school environment. Teacher report forms count for 20% supplementary evidence.


Submission deadline:

By 12 noon on Monday Week 1/Term 3.


Contact and Syllabus:

An initial day of training (in October) will provide the student with an introduction to working with children and conduct in the school environment. A competitive interview system (also in October) will be used to match students with appropriate schools and a specific teacher in the local area, and each student selected will be given a chance to visit the school they will be working in before commencement of the unit. Please note that the training day and a successful interview are necessary prerequisites for continuing on the course. Any student not selected, or who wishes to drop out of the scheme at this stage, will be able to register for an alternative Term 2 option but choice will be limited to courses with available places. The student will be required to spend half a day a week in the school every week for the duration of Term 2. It is intended that there will be no formal lectures associated with the unit, and that wherever possible or appropriate the students’ own ideas and learning will feed back into the content of their activity as they become more experienced. The teachers will act as the main source of guidance but, in addition, students will have a meeting to discuss their progress with the Module Convenor. During the term the student will pursue a special project that focuses on one aspect of the teaching of English Literature in schools.


Learning Outcomes:

It is expected that by the end of the module students will have gained substantial experience of working in the challenging and unpredictable environment of a school.  Furthermore, they will have gained a basic knowledge of many of the key aspects of teaching in schools. On successful completion of this module students will be able to:

  • Show an understanding of teaching methods, classroom management and lesson preparation for English Literature teaching in schools

  • Demonstrate awareness of the different needs of individuals in a learning situation

  • Demonstrate an ability to communicate relevant aspects of their subject

  • Develop and present literary learning materials suitable for the school in which they are placed and for the age group which they are teaching

  • Write a reflective and evaluative report about their classroom experiences.


English Literature students should note that the weekly lecture strand E.CW 300 ‘Beyond Undergraduate English’ has been designed for all students majoring in the Department. You are expected to attend this lecture strand as part of your English programme.


ENGL 380: BETWEEN THE ACTS (Term 1)

Seminar Time and Venue: Monday 2pm-4pm, Bowland North SR 24

Course Convenor: Prof John Schad


Course Aims and Objectives:

The course will begin with writing that looks back to the First World War and end with writing that anticipates the Second World War. In between the students will explore and interrogate the inter-war ‘moment’ through close attention to a number of other texts. The course will focus on many of the great themes of the period such as exile, unemployment, Englishness, eugenics, militarisation, and political commitment, as well as many of the great cultural motifs of the period such as borders, radios, planes, cars, trains, cameras and telephones. Close attention will also be paid to many of the great intellectual debates of the period such as the nature of history, the role of the State in everyday life, and the place of literary experimentation in time of war. The course will not, though, be limited to what these texts are ‘about’ but will also attend to what these texts ‘do.’ In other words, we shall explore how inter-war writing both reflects the period and indeed participates in the period. The students will, then, be expected to understand the ways in which the texts under consideration exist not only ‘between the acts’ but are themselves acts – acts not only of mourning and warning but also agitation, provocation, resistance, despair, and even (therefore) hope.


Assessment:

1 x 5,000-word essay (100%)


Submission Deadline:

12 noon Monday Week 1 / Term 3


Contact Hours:

1 seminar of 90 minutes per week (with exception of Independent Study Week)


Learning Outcomes:

It is intended that by the end of the course the students will have acquired:


  • a detailed knowledge of inter-war writing

  • a keen appreciation of how the history of the period bears upon literary texts

  • a well-developed facility for close reading of inter-war writing


Week 1 - forgotten

D.H. Lawrence, ‘England, My England’ (1921) [will post copy of text on LUVLE]

AND

Katherine Mansfield, ‘The Garden Party’ (1922) [ditto]


week 2 - dead

Siegfried Sassoon, Memoirs of an Infantry Officer (1930)


Week 3 – astonished

Arnold Bennett, The Pretty Lady (1918)

 

Week 4 - accused

Franz Kafka, The Trial (1925)


Week 5 - committed

W.H. Auden, Collected Shorter Poems [to be photocopied and made available in advance]


Week 6 –

reading week


Week 7 – organised

Maurice Blanchot, ‘The Idyll’ (1936) [to be photocopied and made available in advance]


Week 8 – committed

Louis MacNeice, Autumn Journal (1938) [ditto]


Week 9 - stranded

Henry Green, Party Going (1939)


Week 10 - suspended

Virginia Woolf, Between the Acts (1941)


ENGL 384: WOMEN AND POETRY IN AMERICA, 1960 TO THE PRESENT (Term 2)

Seminar Time and Venue: Thursday 2pm-4pm, Bowland North SR 20

Course Convenor: Dr Helen Farish


It would enable those students who have encountered Romantic or Victorian poetry to have a sense of the genre’s possibilities in a contemporary context.

Course Aims and Objectives:


According to the poet and critic, Eavan Boland, between the terms ‘woman’ and ‘poet’ there exists a ‘flawed space’. In its exploration of that space, the course begins with a major figure in American literature of the last five decades, Adrienne Rich, and closes with the publication of Sharon Olds’ Selected Poems in 2005. Rich’s influential (and problematic) call to women poets to ‘write directly and overtly as a woman…to take women’s existence seriously as theme and source for art’, a stance which she argued would close the gap between woman and poet, will overarch discussion of the transitions in Rich’s own oeuvre before tracing her influence on those poets writing in her wake.


In addition to a formal essay, students will have the option either to respond creatively to poems encountered on the course (by writing a sequence of 4 poems) or to identify a theme (eg mothers/daughters, the female erotic, the body) and write the introduction to an anthology of their own devising.


Assessment:

1 x 2,500 word essay (70%); 1 x creative writing portfolio consisting of 4 poems OR 1 x 1,500 word introduction plus contents list for a poetry anthology (reflecting/extending the course focus) (30%)


Contact:

9 seminars, plus one independent study week


Learning Outcomes:


By the end of the module students should be able:


  • To demonstrate an understanding of the development of American women’s poetry in the second half of the twentieth century

  • To reflect critically on the role sex and gender play in poetry

  • To reflect critically on debates within feminist criticism

  • To formulate analyses of texts both orally and in writing

  • To respond creatively to poetry encountered on the course


Set texts:


Adrienne Rich, On Lies, Secrets and Silence (Virago, 1980)

Adrienne Rich, The Dream of a Common Language (Norton, 1978)

Anne Sexton, The Selected Poems of Anne Sexton (ed Middlebrook & Hume George, Virago, 1991)

Denise Levertov, New and Selected Poems (ed Paul A. Lacey, Bloodaxe, 2003)

Louise Gluck, The First Five Books of Poems (Carcanet, 1997)

Lucille Clifton, Blessing the Boats: New and Selected Poems 1988-2000 (BOA editions, 2000)

Sharon Olds, Strike Sparks: Selected Poems of Sharon Olds (Cape, 2005)


Seminar Topics:


Week 1

‘When We Dead Awaken: Writing as Re-Vision’, Adrienne Rich (1971); Selection of key poems (handout)


Week 2

The Selected Poems of Anne Sexton, ed Diane Wood Middlebrook and Diana Hume George (1991)


Week 3

‘Twenty-One Love Poems,’ (from The Dream of a Common Language, Adrienne Rich, 1978)


Week 4

Encountering reading through writing: themed workshop


Week 5

Denise Levertov: New and Selected Poems (ed. Paul A Lacey, 2002)


Week 6

Independent Study Week.


Week 7

The First Five Books of Poems, Louise Gluck (1997)


Week 8

Encountering reading through writing: themed workshop


Week 9

Blessing the Boats: New and Selected Poems 1988-2000, Lucille Clifton (2000)


Week 10

Strike Sparks: Selected Poems of Sharon Olds (2005)


ENGL 385: LITERATURE AND THE VISUAL ARTS (Term 1)

Seminar Time and Venue: Thursday 2pm-4pm, Bowland North SR 24 (Weeks 1-5), Furness C69 (Weeks 7-10)

Course Convenor: Dr Andrew Tate


Course Aims and Objectives

Is it possible to ‘read’ a painting? Can an artist interpret a poem in paint? This course addresses the complex relationship between literature and the visual arts, tracing key debates in aesthetic theory from Romanticism to the twenty-first century.  Literature and the Visual Arts will begin with an introduction to key critical terms and an examination of the painting-inspired poetry of, for example, John Keats and W. H. Auden.  Subsequent seminars will explore the work of figures such as William Blake, John Ruskin and the Pre-Raphaelites who blur the distinction between literature and art; the nineteenth-century revolution in book illustration; the revival of the Pop Art tradition and postmodern narrative practices; and, finally, the fusion of word and image in graphic novels.  The course will draw on the unique resources of the University’s Ruskin Library and rare book archive.


Set Texts:


Blake, William, The Marriage of Heaven and Hell, ed. by Geoffrey Keynes (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1975)

Birch, Dinah, (ed.) John Ruskin: Selected Writings (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2009)

Dickens, Charles, Oliver Twist (any illustrated edition; illustrations by George Cruikshank)

Simmonds, Posy, Tamara Drewe (Paperback edition) (London: Jonathan Cape, 2009)

Other seminar material will be made available as handouts and via LUVLE

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