You are expected to attend this lecture strand as part of your English programme




НазваниеYou are expected to attend this lecture strand as part of your English programme
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Assessment: 1 x 1500-word essay (40%); 1 x 3500 word essay (60%)


Learning outcomes:

  • demonstrate a detailed understanding of the historic relationship between literature and the visual arts

  • show an advanced awareness of narrative style and genre in ‘image texts’ and other media inspired by the visual arts

  • display an awareness of the philosophical, cultural and social contexts that inform texts studied on the course

  • construct clear and critically informed interpretations of literary texts that engage with visual media and visual texts that  engage with literature

Seminar Topics:


Week 1

Introduction: The Seen and the Written

Poetry, prose and theory handout (extracts to be circulated in class)


Week 2

Ekphrastic Poetry

Handout of poems by Keats, Browning, Christina Rossetti, Tom Paulin and others


Week 3

Blake’s Visionary Writing

William Blake, The Marriage of Heaven and Hell


Week 4

Ruskin’s Aesthetics

Extracts from John Ruskin: Selected Writings


Week 5

Ruskin and the Victorian Visual Economy

Visit to the Ruskin Library

Extracts from John Ruskin: Selected Writings


Week 6

Independent Study Week


Week 7

Illustration and Victorian Fiction

Charles Dickens, Oliver Twist


Week 8

Postmodernism and Pop Art

Links to work by Douglas Coupland and others via LUVLE; handout


Week 9

The Graphic Novel

Posy Simmonds, Tamara Drewe


Week 10

Conclusion

Short fiction, extracts of prose (handout)


English Literature students should note that the weekly lecture strand E.CW 300 ‘Beyond Undergraduate English’ has been designed for all students majoring in the Department. You are expected to attend this lecture strand as part of your English programme.


ENGL 386: 21ST CENTURY FICTION (Term 2)

Seminar Time and Venue (Monday Group): Monday 2pm-4pm, Bowland North SR 17

Seminar Time and Venue (Thursday Group): Thursday 2pm-4pm, Furness C69

Course Convenor: Dr Andrew Tate


Course Aims and Objectives

This course explores the shifting shapes of fiction in the early twenty first century.  The course will trace the emergence of innovative, genre-splicing modes of story-telling – a new modernism – in contemporary fiction. Seminars will focus on close readings of a range of novels and short stories in relation to major themes of the last decade including 9/11 and the War on Terror; globalization, wealth and poverty; atheism and the ‘return’ of religion; technology in an ‘accelerated’ culture and environmental anxiety. Key novelists include Ian McEwan, Cormac McCarthy, Margaret Atwood and Zadie Smith. The course offers students an opportunity to address the relationship between different modes of ‘English’ literary fiction in novels and short stories by, for example, British, North American, Indian and Australian writers. 


Assessment: 1 x 2,000-word essay (40%, supplementary evidence); 1 and a half hour ‘seen’ examination (students shown paper in advance; no texts or notes permitted in the exam itself) (60%)


Learning outcomes:


On successful completion of this module students will be able to...

  • demonstrate a detailed understanding of contemporary fiction

  • show an advanced awareness of narrative style and genre in twenty-first Anglophone fiction 

  • display an awareness of the philosophical, cultural and social contexts that inform contemporary fiction

  • construct clear and critically informed interpretations of literary texts  

Set Texts


Adiga, Aravid, The White Tiger (2008)

Atwood, Margaret, Oryx and Crake (2003)

Coupland, Douglas, Hey Nostradamus (2003)

McCarthy, Cormac, The Road (2006)

McGregor, John, If Nobody Speaks of Remarkable Things (2002)

McEwan, Ian, Saturday (2005)

Smith, Zadie, White Teeth (2000)

Winton, Tim, The Turning (2005)


Seminar Topics:


Week 1

Introduction: Fiction in the Twenty-First Century

Extracts from fiction and criticism (to be circulated in the seminar)


Week 2

Narrating the Nation

Zadie Smith, White Teeth


Week 3

Life in a Day

Ian McEwan, Saturday


Week 4

Life in (Another) Day

Jon McGregor, If Nobody Speaks of Remarkable Things


Week 5

Globalization and its Discontents

Aravid Adiga, The White Tiger


Week 6

Independent Study Week


Week 7

The End of the World As We Know It

Margaret Atwood, Oryx and Crake

Cormac McCarthy, The Road


Week 8

Tragedy

Douglas Coupland, Hey Nostradamus


Week 9

Postmodern Parables

Tim Winton, The Turning


Week 10

Conclusion

Extracts (handout)


Week 11

Revision – tbc


English Literature students should note that the weekly lecture strand E.CW 300 ‘Beyond Undergraduate English’ has been designed for all students majoring in the Department. You are expected to attend this lecture strand as part of your English programme.


EURO 312: THE SEARCH FOR IDENTITY IN EUROPEAN MODERNISM

Seminar Time and Venue: Check with DELC

Course Convenor: Mr Maurice Slawinski


Course Aims and Objectives:

This final year European Studies half-unit option is taught in English with texts available in translation, and welcomes students following English and Creative Writing degree schemes as well as DELC students. It focuses on four major texts from the era of classical European modernism: J-K Huysmans, À Rebours (Against Nature); Luigi Pirandello, Sei personaggi in cerca d’autore (Six Characters in Search of an Author); Gabriel Miro, Nuestra Padre San Daniel (Our Father San Daniel) and Franz Kafka, Die Verwandlung (Metaphorphosis).


This course is designed for anyone who wishes to gain an understanding of some of the key themes and issues of European modernism –

  • modernism and religion

  • the fragmented individual: the impact of Nietzschean and psychoanalytical thought

  • the destabilising of gender


These themes will be introduced at the outset of the course, following which each text will be read as an attempt to articulate and grapple with the problems of identity and selfhood generated by the modernist crisis of values. The four works (3 novels, 1 play) will each be situated in their respective (French/Spanish/Italian/German) socio-historical context, affording opportunities for a comparison of the four national cultures at a particular historical moment, as well as of the two genres as vehicles for the individual and social ‘search for identity’.


Assessment:

1 x 2,500-word essay (40%); 1 x 2 hour examination (60%)


Submission deadlines:

To be confirmed with the Department of European Languages and Cultures


Contact:

2 hours per week (lecture or seminar)


Set Texts:


J-K Huysmans, À Rebours (Against Nature), Penguin Classics

Franz Kafka, Die Verwandlung (Metamorphosis and Other Stories

Luigi Pirandello, Sei personaggi in cerca d’autore, 1921 (Six Characters in Search of an Author). Trans Mark Musa, Penguin, 1996.

Gabriel Miro, Nuestro Padre San Daniel, King, Edmund, Ed., Alicante: Instituto de Cultura Juan Gil-Albert (Obra Completa, Vol. XV), 1994. Our father San Daniel: scenes of clerical life, Charlotte Remfry-Kidd (trans.), London: E. Benn Limited, 1930.


This course is taught in English. All texts are available in English translation.


EURO 316: WRITING IN THE MARGINS: NARRATING CROSS-CULTURAL EXPERIENCE

Seminar Time and Venue: Check with DELC

Course Convenor: Professor Robert Crawshaw


Course Aims and Objectives:

‘Writing in the Margins: Narrating the Cross-Cultural Experience’ is a course for anyone who is fascinated by literature, history, testimony, culture and personal identity. It considers a series of memorable narratives by 21st century, European-born authors, including documentary films. It offers an introduction to contemporary theories of identity and writing and to the historical contexts within which each of the narratives is situated. Through autobiographical accounts, films or semi-fictional stories, the works studied describe the experience of being caught ‘between cultures’ as a result of travel or involuntary displacement brought about by war or social upheaval. All the works are contemporary and by writers either living, or who have only recently, prematurely, died. They reflect on questions of culture and identity and the relationship between history and personal destiny in a world marked by trauma, border-crossing, cultural fragmentation and discontinuity. It also raises issues of the post-colonial links between countries within Europe and between Europe and other parts of the world, notably India, North Africa and America.


Assessment:

2 x essays (40%); 1 x 2 hour examination (60%)


Submission deadlines:

To be confirmed with Department of European Languages and Cultures


Learning Outcomes:


  • to help you appreciate further the relationship between history, fiction and personal experience

  • to enhance your understanding of theories of personal identity and their link with writing

  • to sharpen your insight into narrative techniques and modes of representation

  • to extend your knowledge of 20th century European history and it’s colonial past

  • to develop your capacity for independent study and ciritical analysis


Set Texts:

Eva Hoffman, Lost in Translation (1998)

Ismail Kadare (trans. David Bellos), The File on H. (1997)

W.G. Sebald (trans. Anthea Bell), Austerlitz (2001)

Zadie Smith, White Teeth (2000)


Set Films:

Into the Arms of Strangers, dir. John Harries

Les Maîtres-Fous, dir. Jean Rouche

Songcatcher, dir. M. Greenwald

White Teeth, Channel Four Films


These are supported by three key readings – also essential – given out as a booklet.


‘Will’s Diary: Extracts from a Student Narrative’ in Carawshaw et al, Attesting the Self: Student Narration and Identity Change during Periods of Residence Abroad

J. Kristeva, Strangers to Ourselves

F. Maspero, Roissy Express: Journey through the Paris Suburbs


For further reading, see the course LUVLE site.


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