You are expected to attend this lecture strand as part of your English programme




НазваниеYou are expected to attend this lecture strand as part of your English programme
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Course Aims and Objectives:

The course is divided into five key areas: ‘Revolution’; ‘Women’; ‘Nature’; ‘Gothic’; and ‘Second Generation Romanticism’.


In the first term, we will be setting our studies against a social and historical background, understanding the core ideas and principles involved in Romanticism in the light of wider events, particularly the French Revolution (1789) and Napoleonic Wars and the period of political crisis that followed the battle of Waterloo (1815). Why and how do Revolutionary events translate into literary activity?  We will consider how these ideas are related to issues of gender and to two another major preoccupation of Romantic writing, the natural world, which we will explore in the final part of the term.  


In the first half of the second term, the course will then turn its attention to the literary movement of ‘Gothic’ which emerges during the Romantic period. In the second half, with a wider context now fully established, we examine the relationship between first and second generation Romanticism exploring some of the more complex underlying ideas about the workings of the mind, of identity and of the imagination as they find expression in the major writers of the period and considering the extent to which these ideas are located within a social context.


The course aims to give students a well-rounded sense of Romanticism as a full development of earlier eighteenth-century ideas and movements, as well as a distinct period in itself.  We will work out of close knowledge of key texts in order to begin to tackle some of the wider, more abstract ideas, such as nature, memory, imagination, and the sublime. We will also try to consider literary ideas within a broader social, historical and philosophical context. The first coursework assignment will involve a close reading exercise undertaken in the form of a ‘class test’. The second assignment will allow students to explore key themes more broadly and independently. Unassessed presentational work may be required during the term.


Aims:


  • to establish a good knowledge of the poetry, poetics and prose of the period

  • to establish a strong social and historical sense of the period

  • to widen understanding of literary forms and traditions

  • to build confidence in oral and written discussion of such works

  • to gain a full sense of the period in historical, contextual and theoretical terms

  • to enjoy engaging closely with texts, and broadly with philosophical ideas and movements


Learning Outcomes:

  • a detailed knowledge of core Romantic texts

  • an ability to make connections between writers and genres

  • an historical overview of the period

  • a sense of the main theoretical approaches to Romanticism and how to apply them

  • an understanding of key poetic and philosophical ideas in the period

  • confidence in articulating ideas and presenting them orally


Assessment:

1 x close reading exercise (1,000 words; 10% supplementary evidence) - readings given a week in advance, taken as a take-home paper; 1 x 2,000-word essay (30% supplementary evidence); 1 x 2.5 hours examination (60%)


Submission deadlines:

Take-home essay paper = to be handed in by 4pm Monday of Week 10/Term 1

Essay = by 12 noon on Thursday of Week 10/ Term 2.


Contact hours:

1 lecture and 1 seminar per week


Set Texts:

Romanticism: An Anthology ed. Duncan Wu (3rd Ed. 2005). MUST buy this!

Romanticism: A Source Book ed. Simon Bainbridge (2008). Not essential reading, but useful additional contexts, especially for Women and Revolution.

Godwin, William. Caleb Williams, ed. David McCracken (The World’s Classics, 1982).

Lewis, Matthew. The Monk (any affordable edition).

Austen, Jane. Northanger Abbey and Sense and Sensibility (any affordable edition).

Shelley, Mary. Frankenstein (any, but preferably of the 1831 edition, OUP).

Wollstonecraft, Mary, Mary, Or the Wrongs of Women (any edition)


For further reading, see the course LUVLE site.


Lecturers: AHB = Dr Arthur Bradley; AK = Mr Andrew King; CLS = Dr Catherine Spooner; DC = Dr David Cooper; SCB = Dr Sally Bushell; SJJB = Prof Simon Bainbridge; SM = Dr Simon Marsden


English Literature students should note that the weekly lecture strand ENGL 201 (Practical) has been designed to enhance key close reading skills at second-year level. You are expected to attend this lecture strand as part of your English programme.


ENGL 207: BRITISH ROMANTICISM

Lecture Time and Venue (Term 1): Monday 9am – 10am, Elizabeth Livingston Lecture Theatre

Lecture Time and Venue (Term 2): Monday 9am – 10am, Bowland Main Lecture Theatre

Course Convenor: Prof Keith Hanley (Term 1); Dr Sally Bushell (Terms 2 and 3)


Lecture / Seminar Programme: Seminars follow the topics of the lectures


Term 1

Week

Lecture

Lecturer

Seminar

1

Revolutionary Poetry

SM

Extracts (bring Anthology)

2

Blake, The Marriage of Heaven and Hell

DC

Blake, The Marriage of Heaven and Hell

3

Burke and Paine

DC

Extracts in Anthology

4

Mary Wollstonecraft and Women’s Writing

AK

Vindication of the Rights of Women / Mary or the Wrongs of Women

5

Jane Austen, Sense and Sensibility

KLE

Jane Austen, Sense and Sensibility

6

INDEPENDENT STUDY WEEK – NO LECTURE / SEMINAR: UNASSESSED WOMEN POETS ACTIVITY

7

Romantic Concepts of Nature

KAH

The Two Part Prelude & Books VI and XIV

8

Lyrical Ballads: Natural and Supernatural Principles

KAH

Poems in Anthology

9

Ecocritcal Approaches: John Clare

DC

Poems in Anthology

10

Coleridge’s Conversation Poems

DC

Poems in Anthology


Term 2

Week

Lecture

Lecturer

Seminar

Gothic

1

Introduction to Gothic (Extracts from Mysteries of Udolpho; Walpole, The Castle of Otranto; The Monk

CLS

Matthew Lewis, The Monk (and possibly The Castle of Otranto)

2

Matthew Lewis, The Monk

CLS

Matthew Lewis, The Monk

3

Poetic Gothic: Coleridge, ‘Christabel’, ‘The Rime of the Ancient Mariner’: Keats, ‘’La Belle Dames Sans Merci’

SCB

Poems in Anthology

4

Mary Shelley, Frankenstein

TBA

Mary Shelley, Frankenstein

5

Gothic Parody

SM

Jane Austen, Northanger Abbey

6

INDEPENDENT STUDY WEEK – NO LECTURE / SEMINAR

7

Shelley’s Poetics and Politics

TBA

Poems in Anthology

8

Keats’s Odes

AHB

Poems in Anthology

9

Byron, Manfred

TBA

See Anthology for Manfred (and possibly Cain)

10

Byron, Don Juan I and II

TBA

See Anthology



Term 3

Week

Lecture

Lecturer

Seminar

1

No lecture




Revision Seminar

2

No lecture




Revision Seminar
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