You are expected to attend this lecture strand as part of your English programme




НазваниеYou are expected to attend this lecture strand as part of your English programme
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CREW 203: INTERMEDIATE CREATIVE WRITING WORKSHOP


Course Aims and Objectives:

Students will develop key skills introduced at Part I level with an emphasis upon writing as process, exploring creative voice, identifying point of view, the implied author and authorial guises, and considering the creative and interactive nature of reading. A proactive workshop environment will enable the development of specific aesthetic and technical skills through lively participation in constructive criticism relating to fellow students’ work-in-progress. You will gain a deeper understanding of many important concepts such as structure, linguistic texture and resonance, point-of-view, form, pace, characterization, the mediation of tone and reader awareness. While the learning environment will often be in the form of workshops, certain weeks will be designated for focused and practical set tasks. You will be expected to read widely from modern and contemporary creative works and to explore the work of ‘writers on writing’. The aim of this course is to develop a portfolio of closely edited creative work and peer critique work that displays your own forms of expression alongside skills and insights developed through the course.  Students can expect to make fortnightly submissions and to receive oral feedback from their tutor and peers throughout the year. Students must attend seminars with each week’s copies of LUVLE submissions and be prepared to contribute orally to the discussion.


Assessment:

1 x 8,000-word (maximum) portfolio of your own creative work plus 3 critiques of your peers’ work-in-progress, each no more 1,000 words. N.B. The majority of work submitted must have been previously discussed at workshops.

 

Submission deadline:

Portfolio = by 12 noon, Friday Week 2/Term 3

 

Contact:

1 x 120 minute workshop per week

 

Learning Outcomes:

By the end of this course you should have

         a knowledge of a range of genres and conventions and how to put that knowledge into creative and critical practice

         a growing appreciation of structure, reader awareness and how readers interpret and construct texts

         the ability to demonstrate and effectively express an appreciation of the power of the imagination within literary creativity. 

         a well-developed technique for providing annotations and verbal critique of peer work and a knowledge of the critical criteria which underlie successful evaluations

         the ability to develop well-structured peer critiques in written form with reference to wider reading and technical awareness

         explored a range of literary forms and become aware of narrative and poetic effects

         a developing empathy towards the pivotal role of language in the manifestation of meaning together with sensitivity towards the conscious and subconscious energy of language

         a sensitivity and awareness of the subtleties of authorial viewpoints and their implications

         a developing awareness of the structure, demands and interactions of the publishing industry

 


Set Texts:

Relevant authors and literary texts will be recommended by your tutor throughout the year. You will also be expected to read widely and discuss current reading in the workshops. There are no set texts for this course but the following will be suggested in terms of practical guides:

Linda Anderson, Creative Writing Coursebook, A Handbook With Readings

Paul Mills, The Routledge Creative Writing Coursebook.

J. Bell, The Creative Writing Course Book: Forty Authors Share Advice and Exercises for Fiction and Poetry- an excellent, many-voiced source of inspiration for aspiring writers

J. Newman, E. Cusick and A. La Tourette, The Writer’s Workbook, a sound practical guide.

Damon Knight, Creating Short Fiction: The Classic Guide to Writing Short Fiction

George Green and Lizzy Kremer, Writing a Novel and Getting Published for Dummies

Clare Brown & Don Paterson, Don’t Ask me What I Mean, Poets in their own Words

Barry Turner, The Writers Handbook

James M Frey, How to Write a Damn Good Novel.

 

 

Creative Writing students should note that the weekly ENGL 201 Practical Lecture Strand, ‘Close Reading’, which focuses on creative and critical interfaces, has been designed for all students majoring in the Department. You are expected to attend this lecture strand as part of your English with Creative Writing, or English, Creative Writing and Practice programme.

 

Details of this lecture strand can be found above.

 

CREW 203: INTERMEDIATE CREATIVE WRITING WORKSHOP

Workshop Time: As Arranged

Course Convenor: Dr Helen Farish

 

Term 1

Week

 

1

Introduction plus creative free writing

2

Workshop

3

Workshop

4

Workshop

5

Workshop

6

INDEPENDENT STUDY WEEK – NO WORKSHOP

7

Workshop

8

Workshop

9

Workshop

10

Workshop

 

Term 2

Week

 

1

Workshop

2

Workshop

3

Workshop

4

Workshop

5

Workshop

6

INDEPENDENT STUDY WEEK – NO WORKSHOP

7

Workshop

8

How to create a portfolio

9

Tutorials

10

Tutorials

 

Term 3

Week

 

1

Tutorials

2

Tutorials


CREW 204: SHORT FICTION


Course Aims and Objectives:

This module will explore the writing of short stories in a workshop environment through the development of the student’s own work, combined with the directed reading of selected texts. Over the course of ten weeks, you are expected to read and discuss each key text, and to submit your own work for workshopping on a regular basis. Students are also expected to explore some of the books and essays listed as ‘supplementary’ reading: the books are selected to offer different perspectives on the key issues raised. The course should be considered as having a cumulative effect, in that books discussed early on may be drawn upon in later weeks to illustrate different aspects of writing. During the course, you are also expected to keep a journal, in which you reflect upon your writing and reading. The journal will form the basis of the reflective element of your final portfolio.

 

Assessment:

At the end of the Lent term, you are expected to submit a short piece of reflective writing based on your journal, in which you consider your progress throughout the course and detail plans for your final portfolio submission. This will be discussed in an end-of-term personal tutorial with your tutor.

 

1 x portfolio comprising up to 3 short stories, totaling no more than 4,000 words (if you wish to deviate from this, please consult your tutor) and one reflective essay based upon your writer’s journal (1,000 words)

 

Submission deadline:

Portfolio = by 12 noon, Friday Week 2/Term 3

 

Contact:

1 x 90 minute workshop per week

 

Learning Outcomes:

By the end of this course you should have:


  • a working knowledge of the different forms that short stories can take and have practiced some of these forms

  • a working knowledge of the narrative strategies adopted by individual writers in their short stories

  • a practice-based awareness of the process of drafting and revising your own short stories

  • a reflexive journal of that personal writing process

  • a developing awareness of what constitutes a ‘writerly reading’ of textx

  • a developing awareness of contemporary writing from a variety of cultures

  • a well-developed technique for providing critique of peer work and a knowledge of the critical criteria which underlie successful evaluations

  • an increased awareness of the role of the reader in realizing the author’s text

  • a critical awareness of your own strengths and weaknesses as a writer

  • developed your skills in written and oral communication

  • an awareness if the importance of all of the above in your development as a writer


Set Texts:

(all available on LUVLE)


Extraordinary Little Cough, Dylan Thomas, Miscellany Two, Aldine

The Half-Skinned Steer, E. Annie Proulx, Close Range, Fourth Estate

Clown Pants Molina, Stephen D. Guttierez, Sudden Fiction Latino, Norton

The Hotel of the Idle Moon, William Trevor, The Collected Stories, Penguin

Cathedral, Raymond Carver, Where I’m Calling From, Harper Collins

Jambula Tree, Monica Arak de Nyeko, African Love Stories, Ayebia Clarke Publishing

Light is like Water, Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Sudden Fiction Latino, Norton

Waiting for an Angel, Helon Habila, Waiting for an Angel, Penguin


Supplementary Reading

The following books all contain useful information about the art of writing in general and short fiction in particular


Short Circuit, ed. Vanessa Gebbie, Salt Publishing

The Creative Writing Coursebook, ed. Julia Bell & Paul Magrs, Macmillan

Creative Writing, a workbook with readings, ed. Linda Anderson, Routledge

Creative Writing Guidebook, ed. Graeme Harper, Continuum

Modern Criticism and Theory, a reader, ed. David Lodge, Longman

The Rhetoric of Fiction, Wayne Booth, Penguin

How Fiction Works, James Wood, Vintage

Writing Short Stories, Alisa Cox, Routledge
Writers on Writing: http://www.transculturalwriting.com/radiophonics/contents/writersonwriting/index.html

Short Story Website: http://www.theshortstory.org.uk/

Contemporary African Stories: http://www.transculturalwriting.com/radiophonics/contents/magazine/index.html

African Radio Stories: http://www.transculturalwriting.com/radiophonics/contents/onlineworkshops/index.html

The list above is designed to introduce students to a wide spectrum of short stories, practice-based theory and critical reading. Students should read any and all short stories they can obtain – there are anthologies in the library. The short story is a universal literary form and its good to come into contact with as many different viewpoints, cultural settings, and styles as possible.

 

Creative Writing students should note that the weekly ENGL 201 Practical Lecture Strand, ‘Close Reading’, which focuses on creative and critical interfaces, has been designed for all students majoring in the Department. You are expected to attend this lecture strand as part of your English with Creative Writing, or English, Creative Writing and Practice programme.

 

Details of this lecture strand can be found above.


CREW 204: SHORT FICTION

Workshop Time: As Arranged

Term 2

Course Convenor: Dr Graham Mort

 

Term 2

Week

Workshop

Discussion Material

1

The short story and writerly reading: Key elements

Extraordinary Little Cough

2

Enrolling the reader: The thingness of things

The Half-Skinned Steer

3

Alpha and Omega: Beginnings and endings

Clown Pants Molina

4

Dear Reader: Voice, character, narration

The Hotel of the Idle Moon

5

Everybody has to be somewhere: Place and setting

Cathedral

6

INDEPENDENT STUDY WEEK – NO WORKSHOP

7

The way we do things round here: Culture, location, narrative

Jambula Tree

8

Getting it: Motifs, meaning and interpretation

Light is Like Water

9

Time’s Arrow: Structure through time

Waiting for an Angel

10

Personal Tutorials





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