You are expected to attend this lecture strand as part of your English programme




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CREW 205: WRITING POETRY


Course Aims and Objectives:

The emphasis in this module is on reading poems, discussing poems and writing poetry. There is a decent collection of verse at this University’s library, and students will be expected and encouraged to seek out work as a result of seminar and discussion. The writing of poetry is largely dependent on your abilities and adventurousness as a reader. However, technical aspects should not be neglected, and it is strongly recommended that every student buys or borrows of a copy of ‘Rhyme’s Reason’ by John Hollander and ‘The Making of a Poem: a Norton Anthology of Poetic Forms’ by Eavan Boland and Mark Strand.


Each Week (except Week 1) you will:


  • Provide a draft of an original poem and send it to your fellow students and tutor (as in the Short Story module). Deadline: student work posted onto LUVLE 205 site 5 DAYS BEFORE appropriate seminar.

  • Read the appropriate week’s student poems. Annotate, write comments, and come prepared to discuss the work as a group in the seminar.

  • Read the appropriate week’s course poems/supporting materials (as indicated in 205 schedule, below, all posted at the beginning of the course on LUVLE). Think about them before coming to the class. THIS IS IMPORTANT.


During each seminar you will:


  • Discuss your peers’ poems as a group. Your tutor will steer this discussion and highlight key areas for comment and feedback.

  • Discuss the course poems in detail (there is a précis of themes to be explored below: these are not meant to be comprehensive or exhaustive).


Learning Outcomes:

By the end of this course you should have


  • A good working knowledge of how structure in poetry can be adapted to create a variety of effects

  • A well-developed technique for providing critique of peer work and a knowledge of the critical criteria which underlie successful evaluations

  • A sense of the circulatory nature of reading, writing and critical reflection, where poetry is concerned

  • An increased awareness of readers and the variations in reader responses

  • Experience in presenting your work orally to others in the group / in a semi-public forum on campus.

  • Developed your skills of written and oral communication


Assessment:

Obviously, this is a highly relative quantity – we are looking for work that engages with and reflects a fairly intense 10-week seminar series. This could just conceivably mean anything from a long haiku sequence to a short epic. If you insist on strict parameters – 10 poems between sonnet and sestina length would be acceptable, plus one reflective essay based upon your writer’s journal (1,000 words)


Submission deadlines:

Portfolio: 12 noon, Friday of Week 2/Term 3


Key Texts:


John Hollander Rhyme’s Reason (Yale University Press, 2001)

Shira Wolosky The Art of Poetry (Oxford University Press, 2001)

Eavan Boland/Mark Strand The Making of a Poem: a Norton Anthology of Poetic Forms (Norton, 2001)


Recommended Texts:


Ruth Padel 52 Ways of Looking at a Poem (Chatto & Windus, 2002)

John Redmond How to Write a Poem (Blackwell, 2005)

WN Herbert/Matthew Hollis Strong Words: Modern Poets on Modern Poetry (Bloodaxe, 2000)


Recommended Reading:


Jo Shapcott and Matthew Sweeney (eds) Emergency Kit: Poems for Strange Times

Neil Astley (ed) Staying Alive

Neil Astley (ed) Being Alive

Don Paterson and Charles Simic (eds) New British Poetry

Sean O’Brien (ed) The Firebox: British Poetry since 1945

Deryn Rees-Jones (ed) Making for Planet Alice


Creative Writing students should note that that the weekly lecture strand ENGL 201 (Practical) has been designed to enhance key close reading skills at second-year level. You are expected to attend this lecture strand as part of your English with Creative Writing, or English, Creative Writing and Practice programme.


CREW 205: WRITING POETRY

Workshop Time: As Arranged

Term 1

Course Convenor: Professor Paul Farley


Term 1

Week

Workshop

Discussion Material

1

What is Poetry? Some definitions. We will look at Ezra Pound’s ‘A Few Don’ts’ and Langston Hughes’s ‘How to be a Bad Writer’. We will examine what we take poetry to mean. We will discuss the poem as anything BUT a means of self-expression

Ezra Pound, ‘A Few Don’ts’

Langston Hughes, ‘How to be a Bad Writer’

2

Poems as Things Made from Words: A poem is a made thing (poiein: to make). Words often come before ideas or meanings. Poetry is ‘the best words in the best order’. This seminar also looks at levels of diction, the materiality of language and etymologies as springboards. It also begins to look at rhyme and its uses.

Henry Reed, ‘Naming of Parts’

Michael Longley, ‘The Ice-Cream Man’

Paul Muldoon, ‘Quoof’

3

The Rhythm Thing: This week we look at meter and ‘musicality’, how a poem generates or confounds rhythmic expectations, and ask why poems are sometimes organised in regular, or irregular, metrical patterns.

It is recommended that you take a look at the Hollander and Boland/Strand books mentioned before this seminar.


Tony Harrison, ‘Timer’

Tess Gallagher, ‘Black Silk’

4

Time and the Poem: Poetry and Photography: This seminar looks at ekphrasis – poems ‘about’ pictures, or those which hcve some descriptive pictorial dimension – especially, in our time, those which engage with photography. Just within this narrowly defined sub-genre, great variation and invention can still be encountered. We will look at several poems which engage with the still image in a number of ways.

Ted Hughes, ‘Six Young Men’

Douglas Dunn, ‘Portrait Photograph, 1915’

Sharon Olds, ‘I Go Back to May 1937’

Neil Rollinson, ‘Long Exposure’

Margaret Atwood, ‘This is a Photograph of Me’

5

The Secret Life of a Poem: We look at an individual poem by the tutor in detail – this is a chance to speculate on possible precursors, the genesis of poetry and absorption of influences. It is also a chance to look at the importance of drafting. It seeks to give a little first-hand insight into the process, from first notes to finished poem.

Paul Farley, ‘Treacle’










6

INDEPENDENT STUDY WEEK – NO WORKSHOP

7

Finding Form: Why has poetry, across cultures and down the ages, taken on the formal shapes it has? What are the reasons for these organisations of lines and stanzas? What are they doing? Using one verse form – the sonnet – as a focus, this seminar explores deeper engagements between verse form and reader than the standard contract: ‘I am reading a traditional form, with rules’.

Robert Frost, ‘The Silken Tent’

Carol Ann Duffy, ‘Prayer’

W.H Auden, ‘Musee de Beaux Arts’

8

Holding a Line: This seminar explores lineation. How line breaks affect sound and sense. It looks at the sonnet in more detail. It looks at catalogues and lists as poetic forms. It then examines poems as typographical spaces inhabiting a page, what James Fenton has called ‘writing for the eye’.

William Carlos Williams, ‘The Red Wheelbarrow’

e.e cummings, ‘Buffalo Bill’

Guillaume Apollinaire, ‘Il Pleut’

Christopher Smart, from ‘Jubilate Agno’

Don Paterson, ‘The Scale of Intensity’

9

No Direction Home: This seminar looks at the idea of ‘home’ in poetry. Ideas of home as being in the past, or wherever we happen to be now, or ahead of us at some future destination. We will look at memory and loss and scale as things that the short lyric poem can negotiate; and the short lyric itself as a suspension of time, as a space we enter when we read the poem.

Louise Glück, ‘Nostos’

Patrick Kavanagh, ‘Epic’

10

Open Mic: Over to you. Students select one poem they’ve written this term to read to the assembled group. We’ll be looking at how readings and publication ‘complete’ the act of writing a poem, bringing a work into the ken of the listener and reader.






E.CW 300: BEYOND UNDERGRADUATE ENGLISH


Lecture Time and Venue (Term 1): Wednesday 12pm – 1pm, George Fox B56

Lecture Time and Venue (Terms 2 and 3): Wednesday 12pm – 1pm, Marcus Merriman Lecture Theatre


Course Convenor: Professor Keith Hanley (Terms 1 and 3); Mr Tony Pinkney (Term 2)


Course Aims and Objectives:

E.CW 300 ‘Beyond Undergraduate English’ is a lecture strand designed for all students majoring in the Department, as a bridge between undergraduate study and graduate study and/or careers. You are expected to attend as part of the following programmes: English Literature, English Literature with Creative Writing, English, Creative Writing and Practice.


The lecture programme will be delivered by internal and external speakers and will provide you with a range of ways of thinking about your degree in relation to life ‘beyond undergraduate English’. The programme will include:


  • Careers Advice: Speakers from CEEC and CREATE (LUSU)

  • Visiting Speakers: English and Creative Writing Alumni, Creative Practitioners, Employers (e.g. teachers, curators).

  • Lectures from Departmental staff on writing for publication

  • Lectures from Departmental staff on cutting –edge research in English Literature

  • Advice on applying for MA and PhD programmes and funding

  • Advice on designing and undertaking a research project (e.g. ENGL 301 and/or postgraduate study)


Assessment:

There is no assessment on this course.


Contact:

Weekly lectures (50 minutes), beginning Week 1, Term 1


Learning Outcomes:

By the end of this course, you will have

  • Been exposed to a variety of ways in which you can make use of your degree in English, English with Creative Writing or English, Creative Writing and Practice

  • Been given personal guidance on pursuing a range of standard and non-standard career paths

  • Developed knowledge about ways in which to pursue both literary criticism and creative writing as careers

  • Developed about designing and undertaking research projects

  • Been provided with different research models, in the shape of some of the research and research as practice in which members of the Department are engaged

  • Been introduced to the process of applying for postgraduate study and funding


Set Texts:

There is no set reading for this course.


A timetable of lectures will be made available through the course LUVLE site.


ENGL 301: DISSERTATION UNIT


Course Convenor: Dr Lindsey Moore


N.B. IMPORTANT NOTICE FOR SECOND YEAR STUDENTS: This Third Year Course actually starts in the Summer Term of Year 2.


In Week 2 of the Summer Term of Second Year, you will have a lecture on 301, in particular on choosing your topic and writing a dissertation proposal. This lecture takes place in the ENGL 201 Theory and Practice of Criticism lecture time and place, and it is essential that you attend. You will receive your copy of the 301 Handbook in that lecture. You then spend part of the Summer Term of Year 2 researching your possible topic and submit a proposal by the Friday of Week 9 of the Summer Term. You are expected to read for and think about your dissertation over the summer vacation.


Course Aims and Objectives:

This unit, taken in the final year, is compulsory for all English Literature Single Honours students, and optional for English, Creative Writing and Practice Combined Honours students. The unit is intended to give students the opportunity to pursue a topic of their choice in intensive detail, developing research skills in a programme of directed independent study. Students will complete a dissertation of 10,000 words (excluding notes and bibliography), which must be word-processed, properly annotated, and have a substantial and appropriate Bibliography. The final assessment will take into account presentation as well as content.


The introductory lecture in second year advises students on their choice of dissertation topic, research skills, matters of presentation, and proposals, to be submitted to the Undergraduate Office in Friday, Week 29, of the Second Year. The proposal must be submitted in the form outlined in the lecture and ENGL 301 Handbook, and be presented in conformity to the Departmental Style Sheet. We assign students to supervisors on the basis of their proposals.


You are broadly free to write on any literary or theoretical/critical topic, so long as we feel that it is appropriate, the library has adequate resources, you have had appropriate training to tackle the material, and we can supervise it. The dissertation should be an opportunity to build on the skills you have acquired in your second year with the Department, and we expect you to pursue your research with proper regard to modern critical methods and cultural debates. You may choose a topic arising out of one of the courses taught on our programmes, or you may choose to do something entirely different. The material you use in your dissertation must not duplicate material for which you will be assessed in other courses.


The dissertation represents a whole unit’s work, and will require substantial reading, planning and drafting. It is fundamentally your project and responsibility. The supervisor’s role is a limited one; it involves guidance, not the detailed and regular teaching you get on other courses. We hope you will see this as an exciting opportunity to construct your own research project and work it through to a successful conclusion. All students will have four meetings with their supervisors. Two of them will be group seminars (of around one hour) and two will be individual seminars (of around 30 minutes).

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