You are expected to attend this lecture strand as part of your English programme




НазваниеYou are expected to attend this lecture strand as part of your English programme
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Assessment: 1 x dissertation: 100%.

NB: poor presentation, grammatical and stylistic errors, failure to follow the style sheet, etc will be penalized up to a maximum of 10 marks. If your dissertation is more than 10% over 10,000 words, then a penalty will be imposed, of 5 marks per 1000 words. Dissertations more than 10% shorter than 10,000 words do not attract a formal penalty, but are likely to be self-penalising with regards scope, ambition and detail.


Submission deadline: Two ‘soft bound’ copies in clear plastic covers with smooth spine (not spiral), together with two copies of the coversheet slipped inside the plastic cover (not bound in), to be submitted with your name and supervisor clearly shown on the front page cover by 3.00 pm on Thursday of Week 2 of Term 3 i.e. first week back after Easter vacation. (You are also required to submit a copy of your dissertation on flash disc/CD). This must be clearly labelled with your name, date of submission, the course code (ENGL 301) and short title of the dissertation.


Late submission: Extensions are not normally granted for the submission of an ENGL 301 dissertation, except in exceptional circumstances, supported by a statement and corroborating evidence. Such requests must be made directly to the Director of Undergraduate Studies (Students), not your supervisor, who will make a decision in consultation with the Department’s Teaching Committee and, if necessary, External Examiners. Late submissions without permission will be subject to University regulations on penalties for late work, namely a 10 mark deduction for late submission up to 7 days and thereafter a mark of 0.


Contact hours: Periodic meetings to check progress. Meetings are held at the beginning and end of Term 1; mid-Term 2; and the end of Term 2. Times and places will be announced on the ENGL 301 LUVLE site by your supervisor, who will contact you at the start of the academic year.


Learning Outcomes: You will develop the abilities (critical, scholarly and presentational) to carry out a sustained piece of independent academic research, and will develop skills of independent directed study and time management as you pace this activity across an academic year.


See the ENGL 301 handbook and Further ENGL 301 Presentation Guidelines in this handbook for further information.


The one lecture for this course is at the end of Second Year (on ENGL 201).


English Literature students should note that the weekly lecture strand E.CW 300 ‘Beyond Undergraduate English’ has been designed for all students majoring in the Department. You are expected to attend this lecture strand as part of your English programme.


ENGL 302: WOMEN WRITERS OF BRITAIN AND AMERICA


Course Aims and Objectives:

The course redresses the historical marginalisation of women writers in the English literary canon through an exploration of the obstacles women have faced to become writers, what they have chosen to write about and their innovations in terms of genre and form. A selection of texts from the 17th to the 20th century (and across a range of cultures), encompassing autobiographical forms, the novel, poetry and drama, are used to examine relationships between gender, sexuality, race/ethnicity and literary production, and to explore continuities, connections and disparities between representations of female experience. The course is divided into four sections: life-writing (letters, journals and autobiography); romance; history and fantasy. We will be investigating the ways in which women writers have made use of, and revised, these genres. In conjunction with the primary texts, we will consider a range of feminist theories (from Mary Wollstonecraft to Judith Butler) with key extracts included in the 302 course pack (available from the Part II Office).


Lectures and seminars:

The course consists of x18 90-minute seminars, and 7 ‘occasional’ lectures. The aim of the lectures is to introduce feminist literary theory and ways of approaching the different genres studied on the course. The lectures are not on individual texts: they are designed to provide you with conceptual and historical frameworks in which to situate your reading of the primary material. Longer seminars are provided for detailed discussion of the individual texts.


Assessment:

1 x 3,000-word essay (as supplementary evidence); 2 x LUVLE-site exercises based on materials in the course pack (non-assessed); 1 x 3-hour final examination.  Students will also be invited to make short presentations in the seminars, but these will not be assessed.


Submission deadlines:

Essay (3,000 words) = 12 noon, Wednesday, Week 1/Term 2

Non-assessed Exercise = Students are requested to post their summaries on one of the extracts in the course pack on the 302 LUVLE site during Week 7 of each term (i.e. the week following Independent Study Week)


Contact hours:

37 hours


Learning Outcomes: 

By the end of the course you should be able to:

  • engage closely with a range of women’s texts across different periods and genres

  • demonstrate connections and differences between texts

  • contextualise literary material with respect to its production and reception

  • demonstrate an informed historical and political understanding of the different cultural contexts in which the texts were produced

  • demonstrate an understanding of genre theory and of feminist literary criticism/theory.

  • develop the ability to ask appropriate questions of the material in hand

  • make appropriate use of secondary material such as criticism and theory

  • have developed your existing skills (both oral and written) in the analysis of ideas, presentation of arguments and handling of complex issues



Set Texts: (any edition is acceptable)


Margaret Atwood, The Handmaid’s Tale (1985)

Jane Austen, Persuasion (1818)

Pat Barker, Regeneration (1990)

Margaret Cavendish, Duchess of Newcastle, The Convent of Pleasure (1668) [handout]

Caryl Churchill, Top Girls (1984)

Carol Ann Duffy, The World's Wife (2000)

Harriet Jacobs, Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl (1851)

Maxine Hong Kingston, The Woman Warrior (1989)

Jackie Kay, The Adoption Papers (1991)

Toni Morrison, Beloved (1987)

Maria Moulsworth, ‘My Name is Martha’ (1632) [handout]

Dorothy Osborne, Letters (1652-3) [selections on handout]

Marge Piercy, He, She, It (1993)

Jean Rhys, Wide Sargasso Sea (1966)

The Virago Book of Love Poetry (1992)

Sarah Waters, The Nightwatch (2006)

Jeanette Winterson, Written on the Body (1994)

Dorothy Wordsworth, Grasmere Journals (1800-3) [selections on handout]


For further reading, see the course LUVLE site and the course pack which will be available at the beginning of the academic year. Please note that some of the primary texts are included in this pack (including the texts for Week 2).


English Literature students should note that the weekly lecture strand E.CW 300 ‘Beyond Undergraduate English’ has been designed for all students majoring in the Department. You are expected to attend this lecture strand as part of your English programme.


ENGL 302: WOMEN WRITERS

Lecture Time and Venue (Term 1): Thursday 5pm – 6pm, Cavendish Lecture Theatre

Lecture Time and Venue (Term 2): Thursday 5pm – 6pm, Elizabeth Livingston Lecture Theatre

Course Convenor: Professor Lynne Pearce


Lecture / Seminar Programme

Term 1

Week

Lecture

Lecturer

Seminar

1

Introductory Lecture

LP

Introduction

Life Writing: Journals, Letters and Autobiography

2

Introduction to Life Writing

LP

Margaret Cavendish, Dorothy Osborne, Dorothy Wordsworth and Martha Moulsworth (course pack)

3







Harriet Jacobs, Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl

4







Jackie Kay, The Adoption Papers

5







Maxine Hong Kingston, The Woman Warrior

6

INDEPENDENT STUDY WEEK – NO LECTURE / SEMINAR

Romance

7

Introduction to Romance

LP

Jane Austen, Persuasion

8







The Virago Book of Love Poetry

9







Jeanette Winterson, Written on the Body

10

Feminist Theory I

LP

Jean Rhys, Wide Sargasso Sea


Term 2

Week

Lecture

Lecturer

Seminar

History

1

Introduction to History

TBC

Sarah Waters, The Night Watch

2







Toni Morrison, Beloved

3







Toni Morrison, Beloved

4







Caryl Churchill, Top Girls

5







Pat Barker, Regeneration

6

INDEPENDENT STUDY WEEK – NO LECTURE / SEMINAR

Fantasy

7

Introduction to Fantasy

TBC

Margaret Cavendish, The Convent of Pleasure (course pack)

8







Marge Piercy, He, She, It

9







Margaret Atwood, The Handmaid’s Tale

10

Feminist Theory II

TBC

Carol Ann Duffy, The World’s Wife



ENGL 303: FROM DECADENCE TO MODERNISM, 1890-1945


Course Aims and Objectives:

This course aims to examine some of the key writers from a turbulent epoch of artistic experiment and innovation. We will begin with the decadence of the 1890s and then will move on to look in close textual detail at many of the boldest new kinds of poetry and fiction that emerge in the early twentieth century as the new language of modernism. We will also seek to understand the wider social and cultural contexts, including imperialism, nationalist struggles, socialist revolution, feminism and mass-culture, in which these works powerfully intervene.


Assessment:

1 x 3,000-word essay (40% supplementary evidence) plus 1 unassessed exercise; 1 x 3 hour final examination (60%).


Submission Deadline:

Essay = by 12 noon on Wednesday Week 1/Term 2


Contact Hours:

One lecture and one seminar per week


Learning Outcomes:

Students who successfully complete the course will have enhanced their knowledge of early twentieth-century literature and culture, improved their skills in close analysis of literary texts, developed an understanding of the significant affinities and differences between decadent and modernist texts, and enhanced their ability to relate literature to its cultural and critical contexts.


Set Texts:


W.H. Auden, Selected Poems

Joseph Conrad, Lord Jim

Arthur Conan Doyle, The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes

T.S. Eliot, Collected Poems 1909-1962

James Joyce, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man

D.H. Lawrence, Women in Love

Jean Rhys, Good Morning, Midnight

H.G. Wells, The Time Machine

Oscar Wilde, The Picture of Dorian Gray

Virginia Woolf, Mrs Dalloway

Virginia Woolf, To the Lighthouse

W.B. Yeats, Selected Poems


For further reading, see the course LUVLE site.


Lecturers: AES = Dr Tony Sharpe; AWT = Dr Andrew Tate; LCM = Dr Lindsey Moore; LSH = Dr Lee Horsley; MJG = Dr Michael Greaney; TP = Mr Tony Pinkney


English Literature students should note that the weekly lecture strand E.CW 300 ‘Beyond Undergraduate English’ has been designed for all students majoring in the Department. You are expected to attend this lecture strand as part of your English programme.


ENGL 303: FROM DECADENCE TO MODERNISM, 1890-1945

Lecture Time and Venue (Term 1): Tuesday 1pm – 2pm, Marcus Merriman Lecture Theatre

Lecture Time and Venue (Terms 2 and 3): Tuesday 12pm – 1pm, Cavendish Lecture Theatre

Course Convenors: Dr Tony Sharpe (Term 1); Mr Tony Pinkney (Terms 2 and 3)


Lecture / Seminar Programme


Term 1

Week

Lecture

Lecturer

Seminar

1

Introduction

AES

Please see course LUVLE site for weekly readings

2

The Time Machine

LSH




3

The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes

LSH




4

The Picture of Dorian Gray

AWT




5

Early Eliot

AES




6

INDEPENDENT STUDY WEEK – NO LECTURE / SEMINAR

7

The Waste Land

SJS




8

Good Morning, Midnight

AES




9

Mrs Dalloway

SJS




10

To the Lighthouse

LCM





Term 2

Week

Lecture

Lecturer

Seminar

1

Lord Jim 1

MJG

Please see course LUVLE site for weekly readings

2

Lord Jim 2

MJG




3

Yeats 1

AES




4

Yeats 2

TP




5

Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man

TP




6

INDEPENDENT STUDY WEEK – NO LECTURE / SEMINAR

7

D.H. Lawrence 1

TP




8

D.H. Lawrence 2

TP




9

Four Quartets

AES




10

Auden

AES





Term 3

Week

Lecture

Lecturer

Seminar

1

Retrospect

MJG

No Seminar



ENGL 304: AMERICAN LITERATURE FROM 1900


Course Aims and Objectives:

This course examines American literature’s engagements with an extremely dynamic period in the nation’s history and culture. The twentieth century witnessed rapid advancements in technology and industrialisation; patterns of migration and immigration producing increased urbanisation; the expansion of the US economy, the Wall Street Crash and the Great Depression; and the development of the United States as a global power through its involvement in two ‘World’ wars. All of this altered the conception of what ‘America’ was and what it stood for. Some writers subscribed to nostalgic visions of rural America, whereas others subverted these; some assimilated Modernism (and its imperative to ‘make it new’), while others sought to give Modernism a particularly American character – for example by embracing rather than resisting the mass-culture that increasingly defined modern life. Voices previously marginalised became audible, as regional and minority writers declared (in Langston Hughes’s words) ‘I, too, am America’, affirming the tradition of taking ‘America’ as a literary subject whilst implying that ‘America’ may be truest to itself at its own margins.


Assessment:

1 x 3,000-word essay (40% supplementary evidence); 1 x non-assessed exercise; 1 x 3 hour examination (60%).


Submission Deadline:

Essay = by 12pm on Wednesday, Week 1/Term 2. There will be an unassessed LUVLE-based review exercise near the end of Term 2, consisting of commentary on selected passages.


Contact Hours:

1 x 50-minute seminar and 1 x 50-minute lecture per week.


Learning Outcomes:

You should

  • have acquired breadth and depth of knowledge and understanding of the development and variety of American literature in the twentieth century

  • be able to relate works studied to relevant social, political and cultural issues

  • to be able to critically engage the ‘idea’ of ‘America’ emerging from the texts studied

  • have developed your analytical skills in the close reading of literature

  • have developed your written and oral skills through the presentation of arguments and debating of issues

  • have built on your ability to work independently or as part of a team

  • have furthered your ability to engage with secondary criticism and theoretical responses to literature to contextualise your own ideas


Set Texts:


The latest edition of The Norton Anthology of American Literature (1865 to the present), Package 2 (vols. C, D and E), ed. Nina Baym et al., Sixth Edition (New York, 2003).

Douglas Coupland, Generation X: Tales from an Accelerated Culture (1991)

Don Delillo, White Noise (1985)

F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby (1925)

Ernest Hemingway, Fiesta (The Sun Also Rises) (1926)

Toni Morrison, Song of Solomon (1977)

Thomas Pynchon, The Crying of Lot 49 (1966)


For further reading, see the ENGL 304 LUVLE site.


Lecturers: AWT = Dr Andrew Tate; AES = Dr Tony Sharpe; BB = Dr Brian Baker; LSH = Dr Lee Horsley.


English literature students should note that the weekly lecture strand E.CW 300 ‘Beyond Undergraduate English’ has been designed for all students majoring in the Department. You are expected to attend this lecture as part of your English programme.


ENGL 304: AMERICAN LITERATURE FROM 1900

Lecture Time and Venue (Terms 1 and 3): Wednesday 9am – 10am, Faraday Lecture Theatre

Lecture Time and Venue (Term 2): Wednesday 9am – 10am, Marcus Merriman Lecture Theatre

Course Convenors: Dr Tony Sharpe


Lecture / Seminar Programme

Term 1

Week

Lecture

Lecturer

Seminar

1

The Twenties and The Great Gatsby

BB

Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby (not in Norton)

2

Hemingway

AES

Hemingway, Fiesta (The Sun Also Rises) (not in Norton)

3

Seeing it ‘New Englandly’: Frost

LSH

Frost, poems (Norton)

4

‘Make it New’: William Carlos Williams

AES

Williams, poems (Norton)

5

Wallace Stevens: The World, The Poet and the Imagination

AES

Stevens, poems (Norton)

6

INDEPENDENT STUDY WEEK – NO LECTURE / SEMINAR

7

African-American Writing and the Harlem Renaissance

AES

Prose by Zora Neale Hurston and Jean Toomer (Norton)

8

Harlem Renaissance and Jazz and Blues

LSH

Poetry by Sterling A. Brown, Langston Hughes, Countee Cullen, Claude McKay (Norton)

9

Faulkner, As I Lay Dying

BB

Faulkner, As I Lay Dying (Norton)

10

American Tragedy, Williams

BB

Williams, A Streetcar Named Desire (Norton)


Term 2

Week

Lecture

Lecturer

Seminar

1

Postwar / Postmodernity

AWT

LUVLE: Hemingway, ‘A Clean Well-lighted Place’ and Barth: ‘Lost in the Funhouse

2

Pynchon, The Crying of Lot 49

LSH

Pynchon, The Crying of Lot 49

3

American Short Stories

AES

Cheever, ‘The Swimmer’; Barthelme, ‘The Balloon’; Carver, ‘Cathedral’; Pynchon, ‘Entropy’ (Norton)

4

Delillo, White Noise

AWT

Delillo, White Noise (not in Norton)

5

Coupland

AWT

Coupland, Generation X (not in Norton)

6

INDEPENDENT STUDY WEEK – NO LECTURE / SEMINAR

7

Old Strangers in a New World: Native American Writing

AWT

Silko, ‘Lullaby’; Erdrich, ‘Fleur’; Vizenor, ‘Almost Browne’; Ortiz, from Poems from the Veterans Hospital and From the Sand Creek; Harjo, ‘Call it Fear’, ‘white Bear’, ‘The Flood’ (Norton)


8

New African American Writing: Morrison and Walker

AES

Morrison, Song of Solomon; Walker, ‘Everyday Use’ (Norton)

9

Marnet

LSH

Marnet, Glengrarry, Glen Ross

10

No lecture




Review of course



Term 3

Week

Lecture

Lecturer

Seminar

1

No lecture




No seminar

2

Revision lecture

AES

No seminar

3

No lecture




Revision seminar



ENGL 306: SHAKESPEARE





Course Aims and Objectives

Ben Jonson claimed of Shakespeare ‘he was not of an age but for all time.’ This course examines Shakespearean drama in its own time: as a platform in which early modern debates about agency and government, family, national identity, were put into play, and in relation to the politics of our own day. The stage was and is a place in which issues of gender, class, race, gain immediacy through the bodies and voices of actors. By examining poems and plays from across Shakespeare’s career, those written in Elizabeth I’s reign in Term 1 and those written during King James’s reign in Term 2, we will explore their power to shape thoughts and feelings in their own age and in ours. We will consider Shakespeare’s manipulation of genre (comedy, history, tragedy and romance) and the ways the plays make active use of language (verse, prose, rhyme, rhythm) and theatrical languages (costume, stage positions) to generate meaning. The course will consider how, in the past and in the present, Shakespeare’s scripts exploit the emotional and political possibilities of drama.


The plays set for seminars are those listed in the lecture programme. The set text of Shakespeare’s Complete Works is the Norton Shakespeare (International Student Edition) (2008). You must have a copy of the Complete Works as we will be referring to work across the canon, and you should have this edition.


Assessment

1 x 3,000 word essay (40% supplementary evidence), plus 1 x exercise (unassessed); 1 x 3-hour final examination (60%)

Details of the unassessed presentation will be announced at the start of the Lent Term.


Submission deadlines

Essay = Thursday 12 noon Week 10/Term 1.


Contact:

One lecture and one seminar per week


Learning Outcomes:

On successful completion of the course, you should have:

  • acquired an enriched understanding of Shakespeare’s historical context and a grasp of the ways in which this shaped his plays.

  • have a perception of the place of the Shakespearean theatre in Elizabethan and Jacobean politics and its importance as the sight of struggle over interpretations of the state, the family, gender and identity.

  • acquired an informed idea of the actual design and conventions of Shakespeare’s playhouse, and an awareness of how these determined his texts.

  • become familiar with contemporary critical debates about the plays, and to be prepared to apply theoretical concepts introduced in course 201 to their analysis of them.

  • developed an appreciation of how Shakespeare’s drama continues to be a global force in the present, especially through its representation in cinematic forms.


Set Texts:

See Lecture Programme for the plays and poems we will focus on. See LUVLE on a weekly basis for seminar questions.


Essential text:

The Norton Shakespeare (International Student Edition), ed. Stephen Greenblatt, Walter Cohen, Jean E. Howard and Katherine Eisaman Maus (New York and London: W. W. Norton and Company, 2008)


For further reading and details of productions, see the course LUVLE site.


Lecturers: RA = Dr Robert Appelbaum; JD = Dr Jessica Dyson; AGF = Prof Alison Findlay; HH = Dr Hilary Hinds; LOB = Dr Liz Oakley Brown.


English Literature students should note that the weekly lecture strand E.CW 300 ‘Beyond Undergraduate English’ has been designed for all students majoring in the Department. You are expected to attend this lecture strand as part of your English programme.


ENGL 306: SHAKESPEARE

Lecture Time and Venue: Monday 9am – 10am, Cavendish Lecture Theatre

Course Convenor: Dr Hilary Hinds (Term 1); Prof Alison Findlay (Terms 2 and 3)


Lecture / Seminar Programme

Term 1

Week

Lecture

Lecturer

Seminar

1

Introduction: Reading Shakespeare

HH




Elizabethan (1591-1603)

2

The Taming of the Shrew

RA




3

The Rape of Lucrece

LOB




4

A Midsummer Night’s Dream

AGF




5

The Merchant of Venice

RA




6

INDPENDENT STUDY WEEK – NO LECXTURE / SEMINAR

7

Richard II

JD




8

1 Henry IV

HH




9

2 Henry IV

JD




10

Histories in Performance: screening of extracts from 1 Henry IV, 2 Henry IV and Chimes at Midnight

JD





Term 2

Week

Lecture

Lecturer

Seminar

Jacobean (1603-1613)

1

Twelfth Night

AGF




2

Reading Shakespeare II

AGF




3

Measure for Measure

AGF*




4

Othello

JD




5

Sonnets

HH




6

INDEPENDENT STUDY WEEK – NO LECTURE/SEMINAR

7

King Lear

AGF




8

Antony and Cleopatra

JD




9

Cymbeline

JD




10

The Tempest

RA





Term 3

Week

Lecture

Lecturer

Seminar

1

Revision Lecture

AGF





*Term 2, week3: AGF will lecture with a Visiting Lecturer, Dr Nicky Hallett, from the University of Sheffield.


ENGL 307: LITERATURE AND FILM


Course Aims and Objectives:

This course surveys formal, generic, historical, cultural, narrative, and theoretical relationships between literature and film across a range of periods, genres, and cultures, paying particular attention to the practice and analysis of literary film adaptation. Term I presents the history and background of interdisciplinary literature and film studies, introduces theories of the films of literature (adaptation) and of the literatures of film (screenplays, novelisations, reviews, criticism, etc.). Term II considers forms and genres of literature and film in relation to one another.


Assessments and Submission Deadlines:

  • Term 1: 1 x 1,500-word essay, due by 12 noon on Thursday Week 10/Term I (15%) addressing course materials




  • Term 2: 1 x practical/creative project with explanatory essay, due by 12 noon on Monday of Week 17/Term II (30%) addressing course materials


Option 1: Undertake an aspect of adaptation—screenplay scene, short film, musical composition, costume design, set design, etc. that interprets an aspect of a literary work (e.g. a musical motif or costumes that interpret a character).
Option 2: Make a creative work engaging theories of word and image, adaptation, literature and film, etc.

Each project must be accompanied by a 1,000-2,000-word written analysis of its creative and interpretative processes.


  • Term 3: a two-part assessment (the equivalent of a summer exam in other courses)


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