You are expected to attend this lecture strand as part of your English programme




НазваниеYou are expected to attend this lecture strand as part of your English programme
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Part 1: 1 x 2,000-word essay (cf. take-home exam essay), due by 12 noon on Thursday Week 23 /Term III (30%) analysing a text and a film from the course. Students will set their own questions cf. the 201 project, but may only address course materials.


Part 1: multiple choice exam, Term III, date and time TBA, testing coverage (recall and understanding) of readings, lectures, and screenings (25%)


Contact:

1 lecture, 1 film screening, and 1 seminar per week excluding weeks 6 and 16 (independent study weeks)


Learning Outcomes:

On successful completion of the module, students should have a firm grasp of the literature and film debate and of the basic history, theory, and genres of literary film adaptation, be able to address both formal and cultural aspects of adaptation, and understand how literary film adaptations function as critical and interpretative works. Students will develop skills in interdisciplinary analysis and in writing across disciplines. In the practical component, they will grapple with issues in the practice as well as the analysis of interdisciplinary arts.


Set Texts:

Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Lewis Carroll, Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland

Philip K. Dick, ‘Minority Report’ (LUVLE)

Paul Farley, The Ice Age

Graham Greene, The End of the Affair

Jack Schaefer, Shane

Frank Miller, Sin City: The Hard Goodbye

William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet

Robert Louis Stevenson, The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde

Cornell Woolrich, ‘Rear Window’ (course reader)

Course reader containing additional required readings on film history, production, screenwriting, theories of adaptation, and criticism of set texts and films (Purchase from English department office.)


Highly recommended texts: Louis Giannetti, Understanding Movies (12th edition best; earlier editions fine); copies on short loan


Bram Stoker, Dracula


Set Films:

Adaptation, 2002

Alice, 1988

Bram Stoker’s Dracula, 1992

Bride and Prejudice, 2004

Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde, 1920 and 1931 versions

The End of the Affair, 1999

London Orbital, 2002

A Matter of Life and Death, 1946

Minority Report, 2002

Pride and Prejudice, 1944

Rear Window, 1954

Romeo and Juliet, 1968

Shakespeare in Love, 1998

Shane, 1953

Sin City, 2005

The Godfather, 1972

William Shakespeare’s Romeo + Juliet, 1996


Note: We strongly recommend that you purchase or rent the films on which you write. There are numerous, affordable sources for these films on VHS and DVD.

For further reading, see the course LUVLE site.


Lecturers: BB = Dr Brian Baker; KLE = Dr Kamilla Elliott; PJF = Prof Paul Farley; GG = Dr George Green; LSH = Dr Lee Horsley; LCM = Dr Lindsey Moore; CLS = Dr Catherine Spooner; JS = Dr Jayne Steel; AWT = Dr Andrew Tate


ENGL 307: LITERATURE AND FILM

Lecture Time and Venue (Term 1): Tuesday 3pm – 4pm, Faraday Lecture Theatre

Lecture Time and Venue (Terms 2 and 3): Tuesday 4pm – 5pm, Cavndish Lecture Theatre

Film Screening Time and Venue: Monday from 6pm, Frankland Lecture Theatre

Course Convenors: Dr Brian Baker


Lecture / Seminar Programme

Term 1


Week

Lecture and Seminar

Lecturer

Film Screening

1

The films of literature: Theories of adaptation

Read essays in course reader

KLE

Adaptation, dir. Spike Jonze (2002)

2

The languages of film: How to read a film

Read essays in course reader

BB

The Godfather, dir. Francis Ford Coppola (1972)

3

Silent film adaptation

Read The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde

KLE

Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde, dir. John S. Robertson (1920)

4

Early sound film adaptation, film censorship, psychoanalysis and adaptation

Read essays in course reader, review Jekyll and Hyde, begin reading Pride and Prejudice

KLE

Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde, dir. Rouben Mamoulian (1931)

5

Classical Hollywood adaptation, classical Hollywood film style, film design

Finish Pride and Prejudice

BB

Pride and Prejudice, dir. Robert Z. Leonard (1940)

6

INDEPENDENT STUDY WEEK – NO LECTURE / SEMINAR

7

Intercultural adaptations

Review Pride and Prejudice

LCM

Bride and Prejudice, dir. Gurinda Chadha (2005)

8

Poetry and Cinema

Read The Ice Age

PJF

Distant Voices, Still Lives, dir. Terence Davies (1988)

9

Shakespeare, theatre and film I: Changes in film censor-ship, the 60s and youth culture

Read Romeo and Juliet essay in course reader

KLE

Romeo and Juliet, dir. Franco Zefferelli (1968)

10

Shakespeare, theatre and film II: Postmodern adaptation

Read essay in course reader

JS

William Shakespeare’s Romeo + Juliet, dir. Baz Luhrmann (1996)



Term 2

Week

Lecture and Seminar

Lecturer

Film Screening

1

Screening the Author

KLE

Shakespeare in Love, dir. John Madden (1998)

2

Adaptation, children’s literature and animation

Read Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland

KLE

Alice, dir. Jan Svankmajer (1988)

3

Westerns

Read Shane

GG

Shane, dir. George Stevens (1953)

4

Adaptation, graphic novels and the crime genre

Read Sin City: The Hard Goodbye

LSH

Sin City, dir. Frank Miller, Robert Rodriguez and Quentin Tarantino (2005)

5

Digital Cinema

BB

London Orbital, dir. Chris Petit and Iain Sinclair (2002)

6

INDEPENDENT STUDY WEEK – NO LECTURE / SEMINAR

7

Romance

Read The End of the Affair

LP

The End of the Affair, dir. Neil Jordan (1999)

8

Short story, mystery and adaptation

Read ‘Rear Window’ (aka ‘It had to be Murder’ and essays in course reader

BB

Rear Window, dir. Alfred Hitchcock (1954)

9

Short story, science fiction and adaptation

Read ‘Minority Report’ on LUVLE

BB

Minority Report, dir. Steven Spielberg (2002)

10

The vampire in literature and film

Recommended reading: Dracula

Recommended film: Nosferatu

CLS

Bram Stoker’s Dracula, dir. Francis Ford Coppola (1991)


Term 3

Week

Lecture/Seminar

Lecturer

Film Screening

1

Heaven in literature and film

Check LUVLE for reading

AWT

A Matter of Life and Death (1946)

2

No lecture or seminar







3







Presentation of selected creative projects/exam revision. NOTE: This will probably be held in our screening slot to give us more time. Check LUVLE for details.



CREW 303: CREATIVE WRITING WORKSHOP


Course Aims and Objectives:

Students will develop key skills introduced at Part I level and in the first year of Part II with an emphasis upon writing as process, exploring creative voice, identifying point of view, the implied author and authorial guises and considering the creative and interactive nature of reading. A proactive workshop environment will enable the development of specific aesthetic and technical skills through lively participation in constructive criticism relating to fellow students’ work-in-progress. You will gain a deeper understanding of many important concepts such as structure, linguistic texture and resonance, point-of-view, form, pace, characterization, the mediation of tone and reader awareness. While the learning environment will often be in the form of workshops, certain weeks will be designated for focused and practical set tasks. You will be expected to read widely from modern and contemporary creative works and to explore the work of ‘writers on writing’. The aim of this course is to develop a portfolio of closely edited creative work and peer critique work that displays your own forms of expression alongside skills and insights developed through the course.  

Students can expect to make fortnightly submissions on LUVLE and to receive oral feedback from their tutor and their peers. Students must attend seminars with copies of each week’s LUVLE submissions and be prepared to contribute orally to the discussion.

 

Assessment:

1 x 8,000-word (maximum) portfolio of your own creative work; plus 3 critiques of your peers’ work-in-progress, plus a reflective self-critique, each no more than 1,000 words. The majority of work submitted must have been previously discussed at workshops

 

Submission Deadline: Portfolio = by 12 noon on Friday Week 2/Term 3

 

Contact:

1 x 120 minute workshop per week.

 

Learning Outcomes:

By the end of this course you should have

 

         a wide knowledge of a range of genres and conventions and how to put that knowledge into creative and critical practice

         a strong appreciation of structure, reader awareness and how readers interpret and construct texts

         the ability to demonstrate and effectively express an appreciation of the power of the imagination within literary creativity. 

         a well-developed technique for providing annotations and verbal critique of peer work and a knowledge of the critical criteria which underlie successful evaluations

         the ability to develop well structured peer critiques in written form with reference to wider reading and technical awareness

         increased confidence in exploring a range of literary forms and in analysing narrative and poetic effects

         a developing empathy towards the pivotal role of language in the manifestation of meaning together with sensitivity towards the conscious and subconscious energy of language

         a sensitivity and awareness of the subtleties of authorial viewpoints and their implications

         a developing awareness of the structure, demands and interactions of the publishing industry

 


Set Texts:

Relevant authors and literary texts will be recommended by your tutor throughout the year. You will also be expected to read widely and discuss current reading in the workshops. There are no set texts for this course but the following will be suggested in terms of practical guides:

Linda Anderson, Creative Writing Coursebook, A Handbook With Readings

Paul Mills, The Routledge Creative Writing Coursebook.

J. Bell, ed, The Creative Writing Course Book: Forty Authors Share Advice and Exercises for Fiction and Poetry, an excellent many-voiced source of inspiration for aspiring writers.

J. Newman, E. Cusick and A. La Tourette, eds, The Writer’s Workbook, a sound practical guide

Damon Knight, Creating Short Fiction: The Classic Guide to Writing Short Fiction

George Green and Lizzy Kremer, Writing a Novel and Getting Published for Dummies

Clare Brown & Don Paterson, Don’t Ask me What I Mean, Poets in their own Words

Barry Turner, The Writers Handbook

 

 

Creative Writing students should note that the weekly lecture strand E.CW 300, ‘Beyond Undergraduate English’ has been designed for all students majoring in the Department. You are expected to attend this lecture as part of your English with Creative Writing, or English, Creative Writing and Practice programme.

 

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