You are expected to attend this lecture strand as part of your English programme




НазваниеYou are expected to attend this lecture strand as part of your English programme
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CREW 303: CREAITVE WRITING WORKSHOP

Workshop Time: As Arranged

Course Convenor: Dr Helen Farish (Term 1) Dr Jo Baker (Terms 2 and 3)

 

Term I

Week

 

1

Introduction plus creative free writing

2

Workshop

3

Workshop

4

Workshop

5

Workshop

6

INDEPENDENT STUDY WEEK – NO WORKSHOP

7

Workshop

8

Workshop

9

Workshop

10

Workshop

 

Term II

Week

 

1

Workshop

2

Workshop

3

Workshop

4

Workshop

5

Workshop

6

INDEPENDENT STUDY WEEK – NO WORKSHOP

7

Workshop

8

How to create a portfolio

9

Tutorials

10

Tutorials

 

Term III

Week

 

1

Tutorials

2

Tutorials

 


CREW 304: LONGER FICTION


Course Aims and Objectives:

This module will explore the process of writing an extended piece of fiction. The primary focus is the development of the student’s own creative work; this is facilitated through the study of a selection of contemporary novels and secondary texts, and the workshop critique of the student’s ongoing project. Over the course of ten weeks, students are required to read each key text, and to submit extracts of their creative work for critique on a regular basis. Further reading, tailored to the students’ individual needs, will be suggested by the tutor as the course progresses. The course should be considered to have a cumulative effect, in that books discussed early on may be drawn upon in later weeks to illustrate different aspects of writing. During the course you are also expected to keep a journal, which will form the basis of the reflective element of your final portfolio. Towards the end of the half unit, you are expected to submit a short piece of reflective writing based on this journal, in which you consider your progress and detail plans for your final portfolio submission. This will be discussed in an end-of-term personal tutorial with your tutor.


Assessment: 1 x portfolio, consisting of a 4,000-word extract from long fiction and a reflective essay (1,000 words).


Submission Deadlines:

Portfolio = by 12 noon on Friday Week 2/Term 3


Learning Outcomes:

By the end of this course you should have


  • Developed plans, drafts, and begun a piece of long fiction

  • Developed your ability to read as a writer, as distinct from reading as a literary critic or a general reader.

  • An awareness of the issues to be considered in the development of a piece of longer fiction, and the decisions made by individual writers in tackling them.

  • An increased reader-awareness

  • Developed your skills in written and oral communication

  • A developing awareness of contemporary writing

  • A well-developed technique for providing critique of peer work and a knowledge of the critical criteria which underlie successful evaluations

  • Improved editorial skills and a critical awareness of your own strengths and weaknesses as a writer

  • An awareness of the importance of all of the above in your development as a writer


Set Texts:


Paul Auster New York Trilogy

Patrick McCabe, The Butcher Boy

Ian McEwan, Enduring Love

Sarah Waters, The Night Watch


Supplementary Reading: Students are strongly advised to read David Lodge, The Art of Fiction (Penguin, 1992) and Aristotle, Poetics (available in Classical Literary Criticism. Trans. and intro. T.S. Dorsch, Penguin, 1981), and James Wood’s How Fiction Works (Jonathan Cape).


Creative Writing students should note that the weekly lecture strand E.CW 300, ‘Beyond Undergraduate English’ has been designed for all students majoring in the Department. You are expected to attend this lecture as part of your English with Creative Writing, or English, Creative Writing and Practice programme.


CREW 304: LONGER FICTION

Term 1

Workshop Time: As Arranged

Course Convenor: Dr Saleel Nurbhai


Term 2

Week

Workshop

Supporting Material

1

What is long fiction? Some definitions, some suggestions. Key elements, ideas and planning

Aristotle, Poetics

David Lodge, The Art of Fiction

2

Looking at beginnings. Workshop

Ian McEwan, Enduring Love

3

Aspects of voice. Workshop

Patrick McCabe, The Butcher Boy

4

Character. Workshop

Paul Auster, New York Trilogy

5

Plot and Structure. Workshop

Sarah Waters, The Night Watch

6

INDEPENDENT STUDY WEEK – NO WORKSHOP

7

Workshop




8

Workshop




9

Workshop




10

Personal Tutorials






CREW 305: CREATIVE NON-FICTION


Course Aims and Objectives:

This module will explore the writing of Creative Non-Fiction through the development, in a workshop environment, of the student’s own work, combined with the directed reading of a selection of contemporary novels and secondary texts. Over the course of ten weeks, you are expected to read and discuss each key text, and to submit your own work for work-shopping on a regular basis. Students are also expected to familiarize themselves with books listed as ‘supplementary’ and ‘background’ reading: the books are selected to offer different perspectives on the key issues raised. The course should be considered as having a cumulative effect, in that books discussed early on may be drawn upon in later weeks to illustrate different aspects of writing. During the course you are also expected to keep a journal, in which you reflect upon your writing and reading. This journal will form the basis of the reflective element of your final portfolio.


Assessment:

At the end of term, you are expected to submit a short piece of reflective writing based on this journal, in which you consider your progress throughout the course and detail plans for your final portfolio submission. This will be discussed in an end-of-term personal tutorial with your tutor.


1 x portfolio comprising an extract from long fiction (4,000 words) and a reflective essay based on your writer’s journal (1,000 words).


Submission Deadline:

Portfolio = by 12 noon on Friday Week 2/Term 3

Contact:

90 minute workshop weekly.


Learning Outcomes:

By the end of this course you should have


  • A working knowledge of the different forms that Creative Non-Fiction can take, the different purposes it can serve, and have practiced some of those forms.

  • A working knowledge of the strategies adopted by individual writers in the writing of Creative Non-Fiction

  • A developing awareness of what constitutes a ‘writerly reading’ of texts.

  • A developing awareness of contemporary writing

  • A well-developed technique for providing critique of peer work and a knowledge of the critical criteria which underlie successful evaluations

  • An increased reader-awareness

  • A critical awareness of your own strengths and weaknesses as a writer

  • developed your skills in written and oral communication

  • an awareness of the issues to be considered in the planning of a piece of Creative Non-Fiction.

  • Improved editorial skills.

  • an awareness of the importance of all of the above in your development as a writer


Set Texts:

Tom Wolfe, The New Journalism

Norman Mailer, The Fight

Joan Didion, The Year of Magical Thinking

David Sedaris, Me Talk Pretty Some Day

Penelope Lively, Making It Up

Simon Gray, The Smoking Diaries

A.L. Kennedy, On Bullfighting


For further reading, see the course LUVLE site.


Creative Writing students should note that the weekly lecture strand E.CW 300, ‘Beyond Undergraduate English’ has been designed for all students majoring in the Department. You are expected to attend this lecture as part of your English with Creative Writing, or English, Creative Writing and Practice programme.


CREW 305: CREATIVE NON-FICTION

Term 2

Workshop Time: As Arranged

Course Convenor: Dr George Green


Term 1

Week

Workshop

Supporting Material

1

What is creative non-fiction? Some definitions, some suggestions. Key elements, ideas and planning

T. Wolfe, The New Journalism

2

Looking at beginnings. Workshop

J. Didion, The Year of Magical Thinking

3

Aspects of voice and character. Workshop

N. Mailer, The Fight

4

Structural Thinking. Workshop

D. Sedaris, Me Talk Pretty Some Day

5

Subject. Workshop

P. Lively, Making It Up

6

INDEPENDENT STUDY WEEK – NO WORKSHOP

7

Workshop

S. Gray, The Smoking Diaries

8

Workshop

A.L. Kennedy, On Bullfighting

9

Workshop




10

Personal Tutorials





ENGL 353: CLASSIC BRITISH CHILDREN’S FICTION (Term 1 and 2)

Seminar Time and Venue (Term 1): Monday 2pm-4pm, County Main SR 1

Seminar Time and Venue (Term 2): Monday 2pm-4pm, County Main SR1

Course Convenor: Dr Abir Hamdar


Course Aims and Objectives:

The aim of the course is to analyse the genre of children’s literature, in relation to its historical development. The course will focus on the ‘Golden Age’ of children’s literature, at the end of the nineteenth and beginning of the twentieth centuries, and what is sometimes called the second Golden Age, from the 1950s to the 1970s. In looking at the later group of texts, we will be asking how they rework or re-present earlier themes and motifs; what they introduce that is new; and how they deal with the relationship between children and history, and children and war. Particular questions addressed by the course will be: how do these novels address an audience of children, and is there also a different, covert, address to an adult reader? Are these texts subversive, or didactic, and if the latter, what values are they promoting? How do they introduce young readers to the conventions or pleasures of fictionality, such as point-of-view, framing devices, and play with fantasy/reality? How can these works be analysed in terms of categories such as race, class and gender? What kind of assumptions are they making about children and childhood?

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