You are expected to attend this lecture strand as part of your English programme




НазваниеYou are expected to attend this lecture strand as part of your English programme
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Assessment:

20% of your final mark will be for responses of 100-350 words posted on LUVLE, engaging with the week’s topic. 10% of this mark is for posting these up and the other 10% for a final portfolio containing what you think are your four best pieces. The other 80% of your mark will be based on a 4,000-word essay.


Submission deadline:

Portfolio (Term 1 cohort) = by 12 noon on Thursday Week 10/Term 1

Long Essay (Term 1 cohort) = by 12 noon on Monday Week 1/Term 2


Portfolio (Term 2 cohort) = by 12 noon on Thursday Week 10/Term 2

Long Essay (Term 2 cohort) = by 12 noon on Monday Week 1/Term 3


Contact:

9 lectures/seminars, and one Independent Study Week


Learning Outcomes:

By the end of the course, you should be able to understand and discuss the important features of texts written for children as opposed to adults, and the complex relationship between the two categories, ‘children’ and ‘adults’, as they relate to literature.


Set Texts:


Lewis Carroll, Alice Through the Looking Glass.

Edith Nesbit, Five Children and It.

Kenneth Grahame, The Wind in the Willows.

Frances Hodgson Burnett, The Secret Garden

Mary Norton, The Borrowers.

C.S. Lewis, The Lion, The Witch and the Wardrobe.

Phillipa Pearce, Tom’s Midnight Garden.

Nina Bawden, Carrie’s War


For further reading, see the course LUVLE site.


Lecture/Seminar Programme


Week 1

Introduction


Week 2

Alice Through the Looking Glass


Week 3

Five Children and It


Week 4

The Wind in the Willows


Week 5

The Secret Garden


Week 6

Independent Study Week


Week 7

The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe


Week 8

The Borrowers


Week 9

Tom’s Midnight Garden


Week 10

Carrie’s War


English Literature students should note that the weekly lecture strand E.CW 300 ‘Beyond Undergraduate English’ has been designed for all students majoring in the Department. You are expected to attend this lecture strand as part of your English programme.


ENGL 361: LITERATURE OF SLEEP (Term 2)

Seminar Time and Venue: Thursday 2pm-4pm, Bowland North SR 9

Course Convenor: Dr Michael Greaney


Course Aims and Objectives:

This course will focus on the representation of sleep and sleep-related experiences – such as dreaming, hypnosis, insomnia, narcolepsy and somnambulism – in literature and culture. Most of us will spend about a third of our lives asleep – which is to say we spend more time sleeping than doing anything else in our lives. But if sleep is arguably the most common human activity, it is also the least describable. Can sleep – a state that separates us from all sense of time, of language, and from rational self-awareness – even count as a region of human experience? Or is it simply a void that separates one day from the next? How, if at all, can this ‘void’ be represented in literature and culture? In what ways has literature shaped itself to fill this void? And how has literature responded to the erosion of sleep by modern industrial and post-industrial cultures? This course will examine potential answers to these questions offered by a range of modern literary and cultural texts.


Assessment:

1 x 2,000-word essay (40%, supplementary evidence); 1.5 hour examination (60%).


Submission Deadline:

12 noon, Thursday Week 10/Term 2.


Contact:

9 seminars and one Independent Study Week.


Learning Outcomes:

By the end of this module, students should be able to


  • display knowledge and understanding of a diverse range of sleep-related fictional, poetical, dramatic and cinematic texts

  • understand the social, historical and intellectual contexts in which these texts have been produced and consumed

  • apply philosophical and theoretical concepts to literature of sleep


Set Texts:


Please note that we will use LUVLE and handouts for the seminars in Weeks 1, 2 and 4.


Jonathan Coe, House of Sleep

Jenny Diski, The Dream Mistress

Douglas Coupland, Girlfriend in a Coma

Russell Hoban, Amaryllis Night and Day

David Baddiel, Time for Bed


Please note that I will not be placing an order at the University bookshop for these texts as you will be able to pick them up more cheaply in second-hand bookshops or online.


Set Film:


Insomnia, dir. Christopher Nolan


Recommended Supplementary Reading:

Students are strongly encouraged to read Shakespeare’s Macbeth, Charles Perrault’s ‘The Sleeping Beauty in the Wood’ and Washington Irvine’s ‘Rip Van Winkle’ in preparation for this course.


Seminar Topics:


Week 1

Writing Sleep (handout)


Week 2

The Poetry of Sleep (handout)

Poems by Sylvia Plath, Elizabeth Bishop, John Updike, Charles Simic


Week 3

Jonathan Coe, The House of Sleep


Week 4

Stories of Sleep (handout)

Stories by Ernest Hemingway, J.G. Ballard, Jeanette Winterson, Virginia Woolf


Week 5

Jenny Diski, The Dream Mistress


Week 6

Independent Study Week


Week 7

Douglas Coupland, Girlfriend in a Coma


Week 8

Russell Hoban, Amaryllis Night and Day


Week 9

David Baddiel, Time for Bed


Week 10

Insomnia, dir. Christopher Nolan


English Literature students should note that the weekly lecture strand E.CW 300 ‘Beyond Undergraduate English’ has been designed for all students majoring in the Department. You are expected to attend this lecture strand as part of your English programme.

ENGL 365: SCIENCE FICTION (Term 1)

Seminar Time and Venue (Monday Group): Monday 2pm-4pm, Bowland North SR 26

Seminar Time and Venue (Thursday Group): Thursday 2pm-4pm, County Main SR 4

Film Screening Time and Venue: Tuesday from 5pm, Fylde LT 3

Course Convenor: Dr Brian Baker


Course Aims and Objectives:

This course will trace the development of science fiction (SF) in literature and film, providing an insight into the conventions of the genre and, in particular, how the key themes of the science fiction genre have been successfully adapted for the screen. Texts have been chosen from a range of historical periods to enable a consideration of the cultural and historical contexts in which key science fiction texts were produced, and how this effects their development. The course will analyse in detail the formal and generic characteristics of the science fiction novel and the short story, and will provide an introduction to the visual aspects of the science fiction film. The course will integrate themes such as time travel (The Time Machine, The Time Traveller’s Wife), the alien or other (2001, Starship Troopers), robots/androids/ AI (Neuromancer, Blade Runner), or technology and evolution (2001, The Drowned World) with an ongoing investigation of the relationship between science fiction film and ‘literary’ SF texts. The course will consider both how the genre is represented through the cinematic form and what happens in terms of narrative structure, plot and characterisation when presented in an audiovisual format.


Assessment

1 x 1,500 word film analysis. Students to choose/be allocated particular weeks to write on (to be posted up on the LUVLE site in time for class discussions). A hard copy is also to be handed in before the seminar (40%); 1 x 3,000-word essay (60%)


Submission deadlines:

1,500-word film analyses to be handed in one week before the seminar in which the topic is being discussed. For example, if the topic you are writing on is The Time Traveller’s Wife (Week 3), then the analysis should be submitted to the LUVLE page (and a hard copy handed in) during Week 2.

Long Essay = by 12 noon on Monday of Week 1/Term 2


Contact:

1 x 2 hour seminar per week (with the exception of Study Week)


Learning Outcomes:

On satisfactory completion of the course the students will:


  • be able to analyse and evaluate science fiction narratives using the key theories of genre fiction and film adaptation covered in the course

  • have an understanding of the place of narrative and theme within science fiction in film and literature, and will be able to link the texts/films they have studied to key theoretical concepts.

  • understand the relationship of science fiction films and texts to specific historical contexts.

  • have learned to extend their understanding by applying concepts to films and texts not specifically studied in seminars

  • produce a piece of writing that synthesizes the information offered in the weekly seminars with the students’ own comprehension of the narratives.


Set texts:

All currently available from Amazon or the University bookshop


H.G. Wells, The Time Machine (1895)

Audrey Niffenegger, The Time Traveller’s Wife (2004)

J.G. Ballard, The Drowned World (1963)

Arthur C. Clarke, 2001: A Space Odyssey (Orbit, 1990)

Robert A. Henlein, Starship Troopers (1959) (New English Library, 1993)

William Gibson, Neuromancer (1984) (Voyager, 1995)


Set Films:

The Time Machine (1960)

The Time Machine (2002)

2001: A Space Odyssey (1968)

Blade Runner (1982)

Blade Runner: The Director’s Cut (1991)

The Matrix (1999)

Johnny Mnemonic (1995)

Starship Troopers (1997)


For further reading, see the course LUVLE site


Seminar Topics:


Week 1: Introduction

Texts: Selected critical and fictional material, showing of Marker, La Jetée (1962)


Week 2: Time Travel 1

Texts: Wells, The Time Machine; Time travel paradox material (handout); clips from Pal’s The Time Machine (1960) and Wells’s The Time Machine (2002)


Week 3: Time Travel 2

Text: Niffenegger, The Time Traveller’s Wife (2004)


Week 4: Space Travel

Texts: Arthur C Clarke, 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968); clips from Kubrick’s film adaptation


Week 5: The Evolutionary Paradigm

Text: J.G Ballard, The Drowned World


Week 6

Independent Study Week

Read course reader material on Gender and Cyberpunk SF


Week 7: Aliens and Other Men

Texts: Robert A. Heinlein, Starship Troopers (1959); clips from Verhoeven’s film adaptation


Week 8: Postmodern SF: Cyberpunk

William Gibson, Neuromancer and ‘Johnny Mnemonic’ (handout);


Week 9: Postmodern SF: spectacle cinema

Texts: Johnny Mnemonic (1995); The Matrix (1999)


Week 10: Postmodern SF: The Versions of Blade Runner

Texts: Clips and discussion of Ridley Scott, Blade Runner (1982) and Blade Runner: The Director’s Cut (1991) and Blade Runner: The Final Cut (2007)


English Literature students should note that the weekly lecture strand E.CW 300 ‘Beyond Undergraduate English’ has been designed for all students majoring in the Department. You are expected to attend this lecture strand as part of your English programme.


ENGL 369: 20TH CENTURY INDIAN NOVEL (Term 1)

Seminar Time and Venue: Thursday 2pm-4pm, Bowland North SR 21

Course Convenor: Dr Lindsey Moore


Course Aims and Objectives:

This course will be of interest to students wishing to explore Anglophone fiction in another national context and in an international frame. The Indian novel in English is a fascinating, prolific domain of world literature that, particularly since the publication of Salman Rushdie’s Midnight’s Children (1981), has generated a great deal of critical excitement. This course chronologically explores a range of Anglophone Indian (or “Indo-Anglian”) novels, placing Rushdie’s work in literary, historical and cultural context. We will explore, in particular, the relationship between nation and narration, or ways in which writers use different forms and styles to grapple with the diverse realities of modern India, its histories, and its diasporas. Engaging a range of perspectives (gendered, religious and regional), we will consider how and why fiction reflects key aspects of twentieth-century history, such as the legacies of colonial rule, the independence struggle, ‘untouchability’, Partition, women’s rights, democracy, communalist tensions, and migration.


Assessment:

1 x 20-minute Group Presentation (20%); 1 x 4,000-word Essay (own topic) (80%).


Submission Deadline:

Essay = 12 noon, Monday Week 1/Term 2.


Contact:

9 seminars and one independent study/reading week, including a film screening.


Learning Outcomes:

On completing the course, students will have:


  • acquired a good knowledge of issues pertaining to the production and reception of twentieth-century Indian fiction in English

  • been exposed to a range of important Indian Anglophone authors, hopefully whetting their appetite for further exploration of the field

  • acquired knowledge of the historical, social, cultural and political contexts reflected in the fiction under scrutiny

  • considered relevant critical/theoretical contexts, particularly those emerging from postcolonial studies

  • considered the development of ‘English literature’ outside (but often in relation to) Britain

  • developed written and oral presentation skills

  • developed skills of close reading and analysis

  • participated in group work in the assessed presentation

  • pursued an independent, directed topic, related to a particular aspect or aspects of the course through the long essay

  • considered questions of audience, language choice and different forms of writing in relation to the formation of an Anglo-Indian (or Indo-Anglian) canon

  • made use of a range of relevant primary and secondary material

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