Innovation and New Product Development in smes: An Investigation of the Scottish Food Industry




НазваниеInnovation and New Product Development in smes: An Investigation of the Scottish Food Industry
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5.6R&D and innovation in Scotland



Nearly two thirds of business R&D in Scotland occurs in pharmaceuticals, radio, TV & communications equipment (including electronic components) and precision instruments firms (Scottish Science Advisory Committee, 2006). In both output and employment terms these sectors constitute a very small fraction of the Scottish economy. In 2005, employment in these sectors was less than 3% of the total Scottish employment (Scottish Business Statistics, 2007). It is difficult to understand how business R&D, 67% of which occurs in 3% of Scottish economy can significantly influence innovation in the rest of its 97%. The fact that 56% of all Scottish enterprises are innovation active, makes it obvious that a significant proportion of Scottish businesses innovation is not R&D driven. The fallacy of equating R&D with innovation, nonetheless, continues. The Consultation Paper on Science and Innovation Strategy for Scotland (Scottish Government, 2006b) discusses innovation solely from an R&D perspective. What is surprising is that though the consultation paper explicitly admits that, “…business innovation covers a wide spectrum of activity, from at one end, innovation building on scientific advances, through to, at the other end, less science-based activity such as adoption of new business processes and new design. All can lead to competitive advantage, and we do not seek to value one more than another”, it nonetheless continues to discuss innovation from a strict R&D outlook and goes on to advise that Scotland should “…maintain or grow R&D in sectors where Scotland is strong, attract investment into Scotland from multi-nationals willing to carry out R&D, increase R&D intensity in firms or sectors that are lagging behind, develop new R&D intensive sectors and create R&D intensive SMEs …and … increase involvement in the EU Framework Programmes for collaborative R&D”.

It is not that the scientific community in Scotland is not aware of the precarious nature of relationship between R&D and innovation and that it has not brought this out to the notice of the Scottish Government. A working paper prepared for the Scottish Science Advisory Committee categorically states that “Innovation … is not restricted in terms of process or of outcome to science and technology matters, and not to R&D. R&D is but one possible input to innovation.” (Scottish Science Advisory Committee, 2006)


Yet the naïve belief, “R&D leads to innovations in the economy through the development of new products, services and processes” (Scottish Government, 2003) persists. It is obvious that the Scottish Government’s efforts to promote innovation in Scotland are handicapped by its focus on R&D and high-tech.


The fact is that the vast majority of enterprises in Scotland use low-tech manufacturing methods driven not by tradition but by sound economic logic. As this research shows, the competitive advantage of innovative small food companies in Scotland stems from the fact that, they use a labour intensive technology and that their products are hand finished. This combination gives them agility to alter quickly their products in face of changing customer needs. Being low-tech thus is the essence of their innovation and making them high-tech and R&D driven would only compromise their innovative potential.


Interestingly, Scottish Business Attitudes to Research, Development and Innovation (Scottish Government, 2005) at one stage concedes that in Scotland “…excessive attention has been paid to raising high-tech industries, and …more effort should be put into reviving low-tech and ‘maturing’ industries”. There, however, are no indications of any policy initiative reflecting this.

5.7Commercialisation of research by higher education institutes



Another field in which the Scottish Government mistakes inputs as outputs is commercialisation of research by higher education institutes. Higher Education-Business Community Interaction Survey for Scotland shows that in 2003-2004, the Scottish HEIs set up 14 spin-off companies. This made the number of active Scottish spinouts 123. These enterprises gave employment to 1,113 people and had an annual turnover of about £32 million (Scottish Government, 2006a). Based on these statistics the Survey claims, “…universities and colleges contribute to the competitiveness of Scotland’s economy through the commercialisation and transfer of knowledge. This activity is more intensive in Scotland than would be expected based on its population size… Scottish expenditure on Higher Education Research and Development as a percentage of GDP is among the highest of all OECD countries”.


It is difficult to understand how the claim of contribution of commercialisation and transfer of knowledge by the Scottish universities to the competitiveness of the Scottish economy can be supported by the above statistics. As shown earlier, there is no relationship between money spent in a UK region on R&D by universities and innovation by its businesses. Much of the university research, moreover, is basic and its evolution into commercially successful products or technologies is a long, complex and uncertain process. A minuscule proportion of all university research is commercialised. Often researchers would carry away with them their research output and the fact that Scotland has one of the highest rates of PhD graduates working outside the UK provides no solace. Most importantly, as Table 4 shows, in the economy of Scotland, university spin-off’s economic contribution is almost zero.


Table : University spin-off’s Economic Contribution, Scotland, 2004




No. of Units

Employment

Turnover, £ million

Scotland, Total

270,430

2,429,420

198,000

HEIs Spin-offs

123

1113

32

HEIs Spin-offs as a percentage of total

0.045%

0.046%

0.016%

HEIs Spin-offs as a percentage of total, rounded to one decimal place

0.0%

0.0%

0.0%

Based on data in Higher Education-Business Community Interaction Survey 2003-2004 and Scottish Business Statistics, 2004
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