A study of adoption of Web 0 features by Dutch art museums and of ways to encourage user participation in museum social media campaigns




Скачать 494.29 Kb.
НазваниеA study of adoption of Web 0 features by Dutch art museums and of ways to encourage user participation in museum social media campaigns
страница1/15
Дата конвертации17.02.2013
Размер494.29 Kb.
ТипДокументы
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   15
Museums and Web 2.0

A study of adoption of Web 2.0 features by Dutch art museums and of ways to encourage user participation in museum social media campaigns.




ERASMUS UNIVERSITY ROTTERDAM

Master Thesis Cultural Economics and Cultural Entrepreneurship

Natalia Ivanchenko, 351562

August, 2011


Supervisor: Dr. F.J.C. Brouwer


ERASMUS UNIVERSITY ROTTERDAM

Erasmus School of History, Culture and Communication

Master thesis Cultural Economics and Cultural Entrepreneurship


Museums and Web 2.0
A study of adoption of Web 2.0 features by Dutch art museums and of ways to encourage user participation in museum social media campaigns.


Natalia Ivanchenko

351562ni@eur.nl
351562


August 2011


Supervisor: Dr. Dr. F.J.C. Brouwer

Second reader: Dr. Filip Vermeylen


Illustration cover page: made by the author using http://www.eluniversal.com.mx/img/2009/09/Cul/vangoghvcnt.jpg and http://cdn.newsoxy.com/2011/02/facebook-like-button-333x187.jpg
(both last accessed 25/08/2011)

Contents


Chapter 1.Web 2.0 5

1.1.What does Web 2.0 stand for? 5

1.2.Theoretical basis for Web 2.0 7

1.2.1.Social angle 7

1.2.2.Technological angle 10

1.2.3.Socio-economical angle 10

Chapter 2.Applications of Web 2.0 within the museum sector 20

2.1.Barriers in the application of Web 2.0 by museums 21

2.2.Reasons for application of Web 2.0 by museums 24

2.2.1.Museums and the Long Tail 24

2.2.2.Museums and User Generated Content 25

2.2.3.Museums and the Network effect 25

2.2.4.Museums and diffusion of innovations 25

2.2.5.Museums and the Gartner Hype Curve 26

2.2.6.Museums and informational cascades 26

2.2.7.Museums and the wisdom of crowds 26

2.2.8.Museums and data ownership. 27

Chapter 3.How museums implement Web 2.0. A study of Dutch art museums in the region of North Holland 29

3.1.Research methodology 29

3.2.Validity and reliability 32

3.3.Description of the sample 32

3.4.Findings 35

Chapter 4.Encouraging participation in museum social media campaigns 44

4.1.On-line participation 44

4.1.1.Audiences demographics 44

4.1.2.Behavior patterns 46

4.2.Motivation for contributions to social media 47

4.3.Encouraging participation in museum social media campaigns 48

4.3.1.Museum audiences in the Netherlands 49

4.3.2.Looking for correlations 49

4.3.3.Key strategies for encouraging participation in museum social media campaigns 51

Chapter 5.Case study: Hermitage Amsterdam museum 55

5.1.About the Hermitage Amsterdam museum 55

5.2.Campaign description 56

5.3.Campaign design 56

5.4.Campaign aims and target audiences 57

5.5.Limitations 58


Introduction

Lately the world has been witnessing the Web 2.0 climbing the scale of popularity. Its techniques and services have penetrated into many areas of people’s lives, including education, business and politics. A lot of organizations have realized its marketing potential. Museums are also trying to find their way of adopting Web 2.0. For them it is a chance to connect to their audiences and to promote their activities. However, correlating the user-centered paradigm of Web 2.0 with the authoritative position of museums is a difficult task.

This thesis is devoted to the study of the way museums adopt Web 2.0 technologies and services and of the strategies to encourage user participation in museum Web 2.0 campaigns in order to make them more successful. It has a focus on Dutch art museums in the province of North Holland in the Netherlands.

The term “Web 2.0” refers to multiple issues. Chapter 1 sheds light on the phenomenon of Web 2.0 itself and provides descriptions of a range of its features. The scientific concepts behind Web 2.0 are discussed here from three perspectives – social, technological and socio-economical. The discussion is followed by revealing the meaning of these concepts for museums in Chapter 2. Attention is paid to both advantages of Web 2.0 for museum practices and possible barriers for their adoption.

In order to find out how Web 2.0 techniques are being adopted by museums a quantitative research of Art museums in North Holland is undertaken in Chapter 3. Cross-sectional design of the study allows to investigate 27 museums of the region under 10 variables. The research provides an idea of whether Dutch Art museums in North Holland adopt Web 2.0 in their practices and whether their social media activities have been successful in attracting followers.

The latter question leads to the discussion of strategies of encouraging user participation in museum social media campaigns in Chapter 4. Issues like audience structure of social media and its match with museum visitor audiences, user behavior and motivations to contribute as well as types of participatory projects inherited by museums from science labs are covered in that chapter. Basing on the conclusions of all the previous chapters a business model for organizing museum social media campaigns is presented.

Finally, in order to illustrate the strategy at work a development of a participatory project is undertaken within the case study in Chapter 5. The project’s main principles are designed in accordance with the master thesis’s research findings. The museum under investigation of the case study is Hermitage Amsterdam museum.

The thesis aims to answer questions like “What is Web 2.0?”, “What are the barriers and benefits of its adoption by museums?” and “How do museums adopt Web 2.0 features?” in order to find out the answer to the main research question: “How to encourage user participation in museum Web 2.0 campaigns?”

The actuality of the research follows from the financial situation of the museum sector. Museums have already created marketing departments and learned to raise money from ancillary activities. However, in the times of unstable economy and the world financial crisis these methods alone can no longer serve as guarantors of survival. In the current days of scarce funding and subsidies cut each year museums have to explore the world of entrepreneurship. They have to apply new technologies and the latest media trends in their practices in order to be able to find and connect to their audiences where they are, not where museums would prefer them to be. Museums have to search for new business models, which would be able to comply with the specifics of the cultural environment but will be efficient enough to suite business needs of a modern day museum. Assistance and help in this search is one of the tasks of cultural entrepreneurship studies and one of the problems this thesis aims to elaborate on.
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   15

Добавить в свой блог или на сайт

Похожие:

A study of adoption of Web 0 features by Dutch art museums and of ways to encourage user participation in museum social media campaigns iconPolitical Communication: The Mass Media, Campaigns and their Role in American Politics

A study of adoption of Web 0 features by Dutch art museums and of ways to encourage user participation in museum social media campaigns iconSmithsonian American Art Museum

A study of adoption of Web 0 features by Dutch art museums and of ways to encourage user participation in museum social media campaigns iconAmerican Museums and the Persuasive Impulse: Architectural Form and Space as Social Influence

A study of adoption of Web 0 features by Dutch art museums and of ways to encourage user participation in museum social media campaigns icon302 Research Design: Features of study designs

A study of adoption of Web 0 features by Dutch art museums and of ways to encourage user participation in museum social media campaigns iconExplorative User Study Approach for lbs innovation for Hikers

A study of adoption of Web 0 features by Dutch art museums and of ways to encourage user participation in museum social media campaigns iconGresham Portland,OR,us columbus Museum of Art Columbus,OH,US

A study of adoption of Web 0 features by Dutch art museums and of ways to encourage user participation in museum social media campaigns iconA pca study to determine how features in meteorite reflectance spectra vary with the samples’ physical properties

A study of adoption of Web 0 features by Dutch art museums and of ways to encourage user participation in museum social media campaigns iconYoung believers or secular citizens? A study of the influence of religion on political attitudes and participation in Romanian high-school students

A study of adoption of Web 0 features by Dutch art museums and of ways to encourage user participation in museum social media campaigns iconSusan McKay School of English, Media Studies and Art History University of Queensland Australia au

A study of adoption of Web 0 features by Dutch art museums and of ways to encourage user participation in museum social media campaigns iconSecrets of Social Media Marketing By Paul Gillin


Разместите кнопку на своём сайте:
lib.convdocs.org


База данных защищена авторским правом ©lib.convdocs.org 2012
обратиться к администрации
lib.convdocs.org
Главная страница