“The Best of Parashat HaShavuah” Articles taken from list subscriptions on the internet, edited, reformatted and printed for members of Kibbutz Sde Eliyahu




Скачать 326.53 Kb.
Название“The Best of Parashat HaShavuah” Articles taken from list subscriptions on the internet, edited, reformatted and printed for members of Kibbutz Sde Eliyahu
страница1/10
Дата конвертации26.10.2012
Размер326.53 Kb.
ТипДокументы
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10
בס"ד

B PARASHAT HASHAVUA B

PARASHA : RE'EH

Date :27 Av 5771, 27/8/2011

“The Best of Parashat HaShavuah” Articles taken from list subscriptions on the internet, edited, reformatted and printed for members of Kibbutz Sde Eliyahu (Editor: Arieh Yarden)

Dedicated to the loving memory of Avi Mori

Moshe Reuven ben Yaakov z”l

Please respect the Holiness of these pages

These pages are also sent out weekly via the internet in MS Word format. Anyone who is interested in receiving them, can subscribe via the Parasha web site: http://parasha.sde.org.il/eparasha - Arieh.

HhHhHhHhHhHhHhHhHhHh

1 - SHABBAT B’SHABBATO (Tzomet)

Extract from SHABBAT-B'SHABBATO, published by the Zomet Institute of Alon Shevut, Israel; http://www.moreshet.co.il/zomet/index-e.html

AS SHABBAT APPROACHES The Mist of Redemption

- by Rabbi Mordechai Greenberg, Rosh Yeshiva, Kerem B'Yavne

The list of impure birds in this week's Torah portion includes the "rachama" [Devarim 14:17] – which is the same as the "racham" listed in the Torah portion of Shemini. The Talmud teaches us that the name of this bird is a hint of the mercy that will be awakened at the time of the redemption (Chulin 63a). When the rechem bird whistles, it is a sign that the Mashiach has arrived, as is written, "I will whistle for them and I will gather them together" [Zecharia 10:8]. But on the face of it this is problematic: Why should the harbinger of the Mashiach be an impure bird?

I heard from Rav Tzvi Yehuda Kook that redemption in our time purposefully takes place through the efforts of people who we feel are not worthy of the task. The rabbi explained the matter of the whistling based on the words of the TUR (Orach Chaim 286) – that the prayer in Mussaf of Shabbat, "Tikanta Shabbat," is an acrostic in reverse alphabetical order, spelling the word "tashrak," to whistle, as a hint of the above verse from Zecharia. And the Beit Yosef adds that the redemption comes about because of the merits of Shabbat, as is written, "To the barren ones who observe My Shabbat... And I will bring them to My holy mountain" [Yeshayahu 56:4,7]. The fact that the alphabet is in reverse order in the prayer indicates that the sequence of the redemption will cause amazed reactions.

Such a process of redemption begins with the first spark of the revelation of the Mashiach: "I have found my servant David" [Tehillim 89:21]. Where did "I find" him? In Sedom, as is written, "and your two daughters who are here" [Bereishit 19:15]. This process, which is so hard to explain, continues with the encounter between Yehuda and Tamar, and then the meeting of Ruth and Boaz, leading to the birth of David (as is written in the Yalkut, this is what David meant when he said, "My mother conceived me in sin" [Tehillim 51:7]). It then continues with the story of David and Batsheva.

The redemption continues to appear before us in our generation in ways that are hard to understand. Rav Kook said that just as the Almighty appeared at Mount Sinai through a thick cloud and fog, so will the redemption take place. Since the light of redemption is so great, it must be hidden from those who would denounce the process, and it therefore appears in a distorted way. The same idea appears in the book "Aim Habanim Semeichah" –

"As a great plan by the One who makes all the plans, a man rose up... who knew neither the right hand nor the left hand of Judaism... So that when the time came to build up Eretz Yisrael to be a country like all other nations, nobody became suspicious and interfered. The community of Yisrael asked a similar question in the past: 'Master of the Universe, look at all the miracles that You performed through Koresh – wouldn't it have been better to have a righteous man like Daniel do them?' [Shir Hashirim Rabba 5]."

It is said that the author of "Aim Habanim Semeichah," Rabbi Shlomo Teichtal, told a parable about a community whose shamash passed away. His former tasks in serving the community were divided among the people of the congregation. The widow was given the job of waking up the people early in the morning to join in the Selichot prayers. As it happened, the first house she came to was that of a well known "irreligious" man in the community. He had pity on the woman and promised to wake the people instead of her. But wherever he knocked, he was greeted with a refusal: "No sinner like you can wake me up for early morning prayers!" The man finished his rounds, but the result was that on that day not enough men appeared to make up a minyan of ten men. And Rabbi Teichtal scolded his people: "It is true that many Zionists do not observe such mitzvot as keeping Shabbat and others, but this time they have been crying out for a worthy purpose, to move to Eretz Yisrael. Let us hope that we will be able to improve the situation."

POINT OF VIEW Rabbis with an Inferiority Complex

- by Rabbi Yisrael Rozen, Dean of the Zomet Institute

"And you will do what is right and good in the eyes of G-d" [Devarim 6:18] – taking possession of the land. "For you will do what is right in the eyes of G-d" [12:25] – prohibition of drinking blood. "For you will do what is good and right in the eyes of G-d" [12:28] – sacrifices. "To do what is right in the eyes of your G-d" [13:19] – destroying a city of idol worshippers. "For you will do what is right in the eyes of G-d" [21:9] – beheading a calf in order to atone for an unsolved murder.

The command to do "what is right" appears five times in the Torah, all of them in the book of Devarim, as quoted above. The first command is in the portion of Va'etchanan, three are in this week's portion, and the fifth is in next week's portion. The sages derived from the first verse that one should act beyond the strict requirements of the law, and that "force can be applied to prevent a person from acting in the manner of Sedom" [Bava Metzia 16b, 108a; Rambam Hilchot Shechainim 12:5; and more]. That is, the verse is understood to refer to a social demand that goes beyond strict Torah law. In modern times this is what is called "natural morality" or in the current popular phrase, "social justice."

Self-Guilty Rabbis

There are rabbis who consider themselves "prophets of natural morality," or "social rabbis." Their main agenda is to protest against social injustice and to encourage justified social struggles. So far this can be accepted as something that is desirable, worthy, pleasant, good, and beautiful. What seems to me as not good, even ugly, is the "self-guilt" which some of these speakers have adopted. Here is one of the main pearls of their wisdom: The religious Zionist camp is deeply involved in nationalistic challenges and therefore does not pay attention to social problems. As a matter of course these self-guilty rabbis achieve instant media attention for their views.

Writing in a weekend newspaper supplement, the head of a school for social justice took on the role of the Prophet Yirmiyahu and threw some mud at his close surroundings: "The matter of social justice within the religious community is in need of a serious revision. We are a community that is involved in a great many ideals, volunteer activities, and a pioneering spirit, but nothing of this touches on the issue of social justice, because something about the behavior of the nationalistic religious Zionist camp puts emphasis on the community and not on the country... the government health package, the need for a equal-opportunity educational system, and mutual responsibility – [the religious Zionist public] has no idea what to do with such issues. [This camp] sits in the synagogue and continuously talks against the fact that suddenly there are many Gentile workers who are flooding the country..."

Did you get that? "Our" sector is involved in community affairs, while the "middle classes" who are busy trying to improve their living standards, including the "humanists" who appeared night after night on stage with the protesting musicians (does that include Margolit Tzanani, who is being accused of criminal activity?) are raising the banner of the needs of the public as a whole and of the country. These people care about the whole country, while we are behind the times, with an exile mentality ("Until I rose up, Yirmiyahu" (see Shoftim 5:7, referring to the prophetess Devorah). There is no need to go into detail about the distortions of the above passage and in particular the self-guilt of the rabbi, who speaks of justice but does not speak the truth. In the name of "social justice," something which is relevant for the religious community too, I call on this speaker to publicly retract his statement. A school for social justice cannot be built up on the basis of media flattery and sector-related self-guilt of this type.

Social Justice Mainly for Foreigners?

Well, not only do I freely admit it, I am proud of the fact that my view of social justice gives preference to my own nation over foreigners and Gentiles. With a viewpoint stemming from a Jewish nation and not from an exile mentality, I see a difference between a humanitarian approach to strangers on a personal level and the issue of the status of the foreigner in a Jewish state. Granting citizenship to foreign workers, absorbing Sudanese refugees, renting housing to Gentiles within Jewish neighborhoods, refusing to allow foreigners to take over lands belonging to the Jewish National Fund – I approach all of these issues from the viewpoint of the responsibilities of the country and not through binoculars that focus on individualism or a global outlook.

And now take note of a remarkable fact: In all the verses quoted above, with a demand to act in a good and right way, verses which serve as the source in the Torah for moral behavior, the text ends with a demand to behave "in the eyes of G-d" – not in the eyes of man. And all the verses, each and every one, refer not to a social context but rather to a situation where "natural morality" would at first glance seem to oppose the command of the Torah. The good and right "in the eyes of G-d" is not always what would be considered good and right "in the eyes of man." The subjects of the verses include: taking possession of Eretz Yisrael and expelling the Seven Nations; killing the people of a city that was influenced to worship idols; an inhuman ritual of beheading a calf; sacrifices; and ritual slaughtering, a process that is considered inhuman by the modern animal protection societies. These subjects would seem to be the opposite of what the humanitarian school would consider natural morality, but it is "good and right in the eyes of G-d."

The Conflict between Social Issues and Nationalism

And so once again we have come to the vital issue that has occupied me in several of my recent columns: Can a worry for social issues be intimately combined with nationalism? I think that it can, and I am even quite sure that this is so, if we take into account the blessing, "He who separates... between Yisrael and the other nations" [blessing at the end of Shabbat]. My formula for success includes humanitarianism for Gentiles (as long as they are not hostile), while maintaining a separation.

I hope (although I am not absolutely sure) that the "social justice rabbis" agree that at least as far as our enemies and their surroundings are concerned that we must behave in war by pulling out all the stops. I hope and believe (although I am not absolutely sure) that the "social justice rabbis" do not try to protect those who are wrongly considered "innocent" bystanders - people who encourage murderers, send them on their missions with blessings, provide them with "water and food," and urge them on from the rooftops. If "natural morality" is meant to be applied to such people too, then I can only say that there is a very large gap between the social justice school and my own approach.

RESPONSA FOR OUR TIMES Building a Temple outside of Jerusalem

- by Rabbi Re'eim Hacohen, Rosh Yeshiva and Chief Rabbi, Otniel

Question: Can a Temple be built in a place other than the Temple Mount, just as the Tabernacle was erected in Gilgal, Shilo, Nov, and Giv'on?

Answer: Two questions must be answered with respect to this. (1) Is there a prohibition to build a "bama" (an independent altar not in the Temple) after the Temple was destroyed? (2) Even if the prohibition does exist, perhaps it does not prevent us from building a Temple in a place other than on the Temple Mount. This might correspond to the time of Shilo, when sacrificing on a bama was prohibited but the Tabernacle did exist.

It is written, "Beware, lest you bring your Olah sacrifices at every place ... Only in the place which G-d chooses... shall you bring your Olah sacrifices" [Devarim 12:13-14]. The Sifri comments, "The place which G-d chooses – search for the place with the help of a prophet. Should you perhaps wait for the prophet to start? It is written, 'Seek His Shechina, and come there' [12:5] – seek a place and find one, and then the prophet will give his approval.' The same is true of King David, as is written, 'Until I find a place for G-d, a dwelling place for the strong one of Yaacov' [Tehillim 132:5]. How do we know that he only made his decision based on the words of a prophet? It is written, 'And Gad came to David... And he said to him, rise up and make an altar for G-d in the granary of Arvanah, the Yevusite.' [Shmuel II 24:18]." In the Mechilta for the portion of Bo (chapter 1), it is written, "Until Jerusalem was chosen, all of Eretz Yisrael was a possible place to build an altar, but once Jerusalem was chosen the rest of the land of Yisrael was removed, as is written, 'Beware, lest you bring your Olah sacrifices every place... Only in the place which G-d chooses... shall you bring your Olah sacrifices.'" Before the site for the permanent Temple was chosen the status of Jerusalem was that it was a prospective site for the Shechina. Once the site was chosen, Jerusalem came out into the open. As is written, 'For G-d has chosen Zion'... This is my resting place forever' [Tehillim 132:13-14]." This is a clear statement that after the permanent site of the Temple has been chosen no sacrifices can be brought in any place other than in the permanent Temple in Jerusalem.

In the Mishna it is also clear that after Jerusalem was chosen the prohibition of a bama remained in effect even after the destruction of the Temple. "When the Tabernacle was erected, the bamot were prohibited... They came to Galgal, and the bamot were permitted... When they came to Shilo, the bamot were prohibited... and this was considered 'a resting place' [Devarim 12:9]... When they arrived at Nov and Giv'on the bamot were permitted... And then they came to Jerusalem and the bamot were prohibited and they were never again permitted. This is the 'heritage' [ibid]." [Zevachim 14:4-8]. The same concept appears in another Mishna, "The sanctity of Shiloh was followed by permission (to build a bama), but after the sanctity of Jerusalem no permission was given" [Megilla 1:11]. Rabbi Eliezer defines the Temple in a Baraita as follows: "Its sanctity is eternal" [Shavuot 16:2]. Rashi comments, "This is because the sanctity is not followed by permission to make a bama." Tosafot expand on this in a way similar to the Mechilta quoted above, and they write, "This is called eternal sanctity, since it would be improper to sanctify any other site."

Thus, we see that once Jerusalem was chosen there was a general prohibition to build a Temple in any other place. We also see that according to the halacha the position of the external Altar in the Temple is at a precise location, and it must not be erected in any other place. The Rambam rules this way, based on the Midrash: "The position of the Altar is very precise, and it will never be moved from there... Yitzchak was bound in the Temple, as is written, 'Go for yourself to the Land of Moriah' [Bereishit 22:2]. It is also written, 'And Shlomo started to build the House of G-d in Jerusalem, on Mount Moriah...' [Divrei Hayamim II 3:1]." [Hilchot Beit Habchira 2:1]. In the beginning of Hilchot Beit Habechira, the Rambam combines the laws of the Temple with those of the Altar, focusing the prohibition on the erection of another Temple and not on the prohibition of a bama: "After the Temple was built in Jerusalem, all other places became forbidden as a site for a House of G-d and for bringing sacrifices, and no eternal house will be built except for in Jerusalem and on Mount Moriah, about which it is written, 'And David said, this is the House of G-d, and this is the Altar for sacrificing an Olah' [Divrei Hayamim I 22:1]. And it is written, 'This will be My resting place forever' [Tehillim 132:14]." [1:3].

The position of the Holy of Holies is on the "Even Hashetiya," the foundation stone where the creation of the world began (Yoma 54b). This is where the Tablets which are the foundation of the world are stored, and the site of the Altar is where man was created. It is clear that these sites cannot be replaced, since each one is significant in its own right.

  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10

Добавить в свой блог или на сайт

Похожие:

“The Best of Parashat HaShavuah” Articles taken from list subscriptions on the internet, edited, reformatted and printed for members of Kibbutz Sde Eliyahu icon“The Best of Parashat HaShavuah” Articles taken from list subscriptions on the internet, edited, reformatted and printed for members of Kibbutz Sde Eliyahu

“The Best of Parashat HaShavuah” Articles taken from list subscriptions on the internet, edited, reformatted and printed for members of Kibbutz Sde Eliyahu icon“The Best of Parashat HaShavuah” Articles taken from list subscriptions on the internet, edited, reformatted and printed for members of Kibbutz Sde Eliyahu

“The Best of Parashat HaShavuah” Articles taken from list subscriptions on the internet, edited, reformatted and printed for members of Kibbutz Sde Eliyahu icon“The Best of Parashat HaShavuah” Articles taken from list subscriptions on the internet, edited, reformatted and printed for members of Kibbutz Sde Eliyahu

“The Best of Parashat HaShavuah” Articles taken from list subscriptions on the internet, edited, reformatted and printed for members of Kibbutz Sde Eliyahu icon“The Best of Parashat HaShavuah” Articles taken from list subscriptions on the internet, edited, reformatted and printed for members of Kibbutz Sde Eliyahu

“The Best of Parashat HaShavuah” Articles taken from list subscriptions on the internet, edited, reformatted and printed for members of Kibbutz Sde Eliyahu icon“The Best of Parashat HaShavuah” Articles taken from list subscriptions on the internet, edited, reformatted and printed for members of Kibbutz Sde Eliyahu

“The Best of Parashat HaShavuah” Articles taken from list subscriptions on the internet, edited, reformatted and printed for members of Kibbutz Sde Eliyahu icon“The Best of Parashat HaShavuah” Articles taken from list subscriptions on the internet, edited, reformatted and printed for members of Kibbutz Sde Eliyahu

“The Best of Parashat HaShavuah” Articles taken from list subscriptions on the internet, edited, reformatted and printed for members of Kibbutz Sde Eliyahu icon“The Best of Parashat HaShavuah” Articles taken from list subscriptions on the internet, edited, reformatted and printed for members of Kibbutz Sde Eliyahu

“The Best of Parashat HaShavuah” Articles taken from list subscriptions on the internet, edited, reformatted and printed for members of Kibbutz Sde Eliyahu icon“The Best of Parashat HaShavuah” Articles taken from list subscriptions on the internet, edited, reformatted and printed for members of Kibbutz Sde Eliyahu

“The Best of Parashat HaShavuah” Articles taken from list subscriptions on the internet, edited, reformatted and printed for members of Kibbutz Sde Eliyahu icon“The Best of Parashat HaShavuah” Articles taken from list subscriptions on the internet, edited, reformatted and printed for members of Kibbutz Sde Eliyahu

“The Best of Parashat HaShavuah” Articles taken from list subscriptions on the internet, edited, reformatted and printed for members of Kibbutz Sde Eliyahu icon“The Best of Parashat HaShavuah” Articles taken from list subscriptions on the internet, edited, reformatted and printed for members of Kibbutz Sde Eliyahu


Разместите кнопку на своём сайте:
lib.convdocs.org


База данных защищена авторским правом ©lib.convdocs.org 2012
обратиться к администрации
lib.convdocs.org
Главная страница