“The Best of Parashat HaShavuah” Articles taken from list subscriptions on the internet, edited, reformatted and printed for members of Kibbutz Sde Eliyahu




Скачать 323.64 Kb.
Название“The Best of Parashat HaShavuah” Articles taken from list subscriptions on the internet, edited, reformatted and printed for members of Kibbutz Sde Eliyahu
страница1/10
Дата конвертации19.04.2013
Размер323.64 Kb.
ТипДокументы
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10
בס"ד

B PARASHAT HASHAVUA B

PARASHA : VAYESHEV

Date :23 Kislev 5762, 8/12/2001

“The Best of Parashat HaShavuah” Articles taken from list subscriptions on the internet, edited, reformatted and printed for members of Kibbutz Sde Eliyahu (Editor: Arieh Yarden)

Dedicated to the loving memory of Avi Mori

Moshe Reuven ben Yaakov z”l

Please respect the Holiness of these pages

These pages are also sent out weekly via the internet in MS Word format. Anyone interested in receiving them, please feel feee to contact me at the following email address: yarden@seliyahu.org.il - Arieh.

HhHhHhHhHhHhHhHhHhHhH

1 - SHABBAT B’SHABBATO (Tzomet)

Extract from SHABBAT-B'SHABBATO, published by the Zomet Institute of Alon Shevut, Israel

A MORAL BLEMISH, IN SPITE OF THE DIVINE PROCESS

by Rabbi Moshe Shefter, Head of "Torah MiTzion" Kollel, Washington

The sale of Yosef by his brothers raises a number of questions and is a sign of darkness with respect to the ethical standards in Yaacov's home. In the end, his sons are shocked by the silent criticism when Yosef identifies himself, "And his brothers could not answer him, for they were startled by him" [Bereishit 45:3].

The sages view the sale of Yosef as a moral blemish that accompanies Bnei Yisrael throughout history. The Midrash of the Ten Martyrs describes the claim made by the Roman Emperor against the wise men of the nation. "He sent a message to Raban Shimon Ben Gamliel and his colleagues, asking them the law of one who kidnaps a person from Bnei Yisrael and sells him. And they replied, He should be punished by death. He said, If so, you should be put to death; accept the judgement of the heavens. And they asked, Why is this so? He replied, It is for Yosef's brothers, who sold him, as is written, 'And they sold Yosef' [Bereishit 37:28]. As the prophet wrote, 'For selling a righteous person for money, and a pauper for shoes' [Amos 2:6]. And the sages could not answer him, just like Yosef's brothers before them."

Yosef comforted his brothers by telling them, "Now, you are not the ones who sent me here but rather it was G-d, and He made me a father to Pharaoh... and a ruler of the entire land of Egypt" [45:8]. Divine control caused Yosef to be sold in order to rescue the people of Canaan and Yaacov's household from famine later on. But even Yosef only understood part of the Divine scheme. The Midrash teaches us that Yosef's sale is part of an even greater process, the fulfillment of the covenant with Avraham. "'He sent him from the Valley of Chevron' [37:14]. He went to complete the profound plan that G-d had prepared between Himself and the pleasant colleague buried in Chevron (Avraham), 'And they will serve them, and they will oppress them' [15:13]." [Bereishit Rabba 84:13]. The act of selling Yosef led to the journey of Bnei Yisrael to Egypt, in order to fulfil G-d's words to Avraham. "Your descendents will be strangers in a land foreign to them" [15:13].

Even though the brothers are participating in a historic scheme that they do not understand, G-d places before them a harsh moral demand. "This is what G-d says: Let three sins pass, but the fourth I will not forgive. For they sold a righteous person for money, and a pauper for shoes" [Amos 2:6]. Being part of a grand historic process does not absolve us from responsibility for our actions.

The penance for the sin of selling Yosef is to strengthen our sense of mutual responsibility, love, and unity. These are vital elements in our spiritual and physical immunity from harm, and in our right to take possession of the land. "Behold, I take the wood of Yosef... [and] the wood of Yehuda, and they become one piece in my hand... And I will form them into one nation in the land... And they will dwell in the land that I gave to my servant Yaacov." [Yechezkel 37:19-25].

COMMENTARY ON PRAYERS: Is it Permitted to Sit Down During Prayer?

by Rabbi Uri Dasberg

Some people stand for an entire prayer, as is written, "standing there before G-d" [Devarim 18:7], just as "angels stand above Him" [Yeshayahu 6:2]. The law is that it is forbidden to sit in the courtyard of the Temple. However, in spite of this there is one section of the daily prayers where we have been explicitly told to sit down. This is "Tachanun," and the Beit Yosef writes in the name of masters of Kabbala that one should sit while reciting it (Orach Chaim 131).

Tachanun is known as "Nefilat Apayim," because we are commanded to lean on our arms during the prayer. According to the Shelah, the words "We do not know" are recited while still sitting, and at the phrase "What shall we do?" we stand up. Thus we show that we have tried all possible alternatives. We sat down like Moshe ("And I sat on the mountain" [Devarim 9:9]) and we also leaned on our arms ("I threw myself down before G-d" [9:18]). Now there is no other way left to us - "We do not know what to do." Thus, sitting during Tachanun is a way to fulfill the phrase, "All my bones will proclaim, who is like you, G-d?" [Tehillim 35:10]. For the same reason, we rock back and forth during prayer.

However, it may be that one cannot sit down for Tachanun. For example, someone who has not finished Shemona Essrei might be standing right behind us. Or a chazan who has just finished repeating the Shemona Essrei, who does not want to step backwards until after the Kaddish, who therefore does not want to move from his position. In such cases, it is possible to depend on the opinions of some sages, who feel that there is no absolute requirement to sit down during Tachanun (Rivash, Maharil). In addition, it is possible to lean on something, since leaning can be considered similar to sitting.

POINT OF VIEW: Rabbi Neria, Greatness in a Modest Image

by Rabbi Yisrael Rozen

"Yosef... was a youth, with the sons of Bilhah" [Bereishit 37:2]. "Fixing his hair and taking care of his eyes so that he would look good" [Rashi].

This week, on 19 Kislev, we mark the sixth anniversary of the death of Rabbi Moshe Tzvi Neria. The founder of the Bnei Akiva Yeshivot and the spiritual ancestor of religious Zionist youth in general, he was known by the nickname "father of the knitted Kippa generation." This is a credit both to him and to the world. However, this weekly column does not deal with eulogies but rather with modern aspects of Torah living. Let us therefore take this opportunity to look at Rabbi Neria in light of current events.

Readers of "Hatzofeh" have recently been able to follow a running discussion started by two prominent men in the religious Zionist sector (both kibbutz members, both long associated with Bnei Akiva). They questioned whether the rabbi was really committed to the values of Torah and labor and to linking the holy and the secular. They talk about "moments of truth" when Rabbi Neria revealed to them his secret yearnings about the Chareidi way of life, with the approach that "I have nothing else but Torah." They summarize their approach in a slogan of sorts, these people who have second thoughts about their mentor: Rabbi Neria's personality as we know it was in reaction to reality and not his ideal ("bedi'avad" and not "lechatchila").

I categorize this phenomenon as part of the ongoing fashion of "shattering myths" that has appeared in all walks of life, connected to the modern era of "post-" everything. In line with this, Rabbi Neria must be stood up for a public flogging. He is no longer to be considered as one of the great people of the generation, as befits the attitude of pupils who venerate their great teachers. Rather, he should be treated to a lessening of his image, as is relevant to the approach of historians, who know how to investigate secrets, reveal what has been concealed, and discover the paradoxes in life.

Well, all of the rabbi's true disciples completely reject this "revelation," which is nothing more than a reflection of the viewpoint of the people who propose it. From my point of view, "Rabbi Neria" - both as a personality and as a concept - was simply so far above his critics that they are not able to understand how complex he was. Such great people arrive at the crossroads of history at rare intervals, once in many generations. The rabbi was such a man, and his accomplishments corresponded to his stature.

Intimate discussions by the rabbi as the end of Shabbat approached, where he described a desire to lift the religious Zionist sector ever higher up the rungs of Torah, are nothing more than an expression of tension between reality and ideal, of a yearning for purity of the elite camp. He never defined Bnei Akiva and its surroundings as "bedi'avad," a situation to be avoided.

Those who would undermine his memory are attempting to describe Rabbi Neria as someone who (in effect) taught things he did not really believe. Thus, they agree that in public he expressed a fondness for religious Zionism, settlements, military service, mixing the sexes in social settings, and secular studies. However, they say, deep in his soul, he was jealous of the Chareidi world and looked on it with a feeling of inferiority. I am not surprised that this analysis has been proposed by people who are prominent in the "enlightened" world, and not within the walls of the Beit Midrash. It seems to me that all those who are dedicated to Torah and who are Torah scholars among our camp can well understand Rabbi Neria's spiritual upheaval. None of these people feel that they are living a life of "bedi'avad."

Rabbi Neria does not need me or people like me to defend him, and the many thousands of people who are part of the "generation of the knitted kippa" serve as a living demonstration of his way of life. The path of religious Zionism is complex by definition. One who shatters the legends of the great people in our past and describes them as chronic doubters of their own path can be accused of being shallow, perverting the truth, and - worst of all - causing great harm to our educational path.

We will end this article with a quote from Rabbi Neria relevant to this week's Torah portion (from "Ner Lamaor," recently published by "Or Etzion"). "Yosef had to pave a path of service to G-d through external activities. He opposed people whose only objectives were the external aspects of life... His approach had divine approval. He was never criticized or punished for the direction he took that began in the early days, when 'he was a youth' [Bereishit 37:2]." And Rabbi Neria added that Yosef's father even supported his external self-adornment... by giving him "a striped cloak" [37:3].

ABOUT AND BY THE COMMENTATORS: A Wife According to Logic

by Rabbi Amnon Bazak

In the thirteenth century, there was a storm of controversy in the area of southern France and in Spain with respect to philosophy and its influence. As one aspect of this, a man named Rabbi Yisrael claimed to Rabbi Asher Ben Yechiel (the ROSH) that halacha should be decided by "logic." He brought proof of this from this week's Torah portion. "It is only logical that if one takes a woman for the purpose of having children, whether Jewish or not, she should be considered his wife. Anyone else who lies down with her is attacking the world from the point of view of logic. Proof of this can be seen from the words of Yosef to Potiphar's wife about her husband, 'He did not deny me anything except for you, since you are his wife' [Bereishit 39:9]. That is, he apologized to her that he could not lie with her, since she was married... A Jewish woman is a wife by logic and for religious reasons, while a Gentile woman is a wife based on logic alone and not because of religion." [Responsa of the ROSH, 55:9].

The ROSH (approximately 1250-1327) was strongly opposed to the philosophic approach, and he replied in very harsh language. For example, he wrote: "The wisdom of philosophy and the wisdom of the Torah and its laws are based on very different approaches. The Torah was received by Moshe at Sinai, and the sage derives laws from it by methods that are proper and accepted, by legitimate comparisons... However, philosophy is based on nature, and its wise men base their approach to everything on natural traits, so they are forced to deny Moshe's Torah... All who abide by this approach cannot be accepted."

The ROSH began his career in the yeshivot of Ashkenaz and France, studying from his mentor, the Maharam of Ruttenberg. After the Maharam was arrested as part of the persecution of the Jews of Ashkenaz, he fled to Spain, where he became the most prominent rabbi, after the death of the Rashba. His great works, commentaries on the Talmud and Tosafot, and responsa, are a blend of the approaches of the masters of the Tosafot in Ashkenaz and of the great rabbis of Spain.

TORAH AND GOVERNMENT: Limits to the Authority of a King -- continued

by Rabbi Yosef Carmel, Eretz Chemdah Institute

Modern commentators have suggested that the basis for the authority of a king can be seen from the words of the Mishna, "'Place a king over you' [Devarim 17:15] - you should fear him" [Sanhedrin 2:5]. The reasoning is that if the king would not have the authority to punish the people and to force them to obey commands, why should they have any fear? However, Rabbi Shaul Yisraeli rejects this, saying, "The verse does not imply that the king can mete out punishment, and certainly not a death penalty" ["Amud Yemini" 1:9]. This is especially true since the subject of this Mishna is respect for the king. "One should not ride on his horse or sit in his chair." Thus, respect and distance are what give rise to fear, and there is no reference to punishment. The phrase "fear of the king" also appears in relation to the law that "a king is not allowed to ignore his respect" [Ketuvot 17a], and in this case too Rabbi Yisraeli's reasoning seems correct.

On the other hand, the Rambam writes that the king "is privileged to have everything written in the passage about the king " [Hilchot Melachim 4:1], immediately adding an explanation of the "laws of the king" as described by Shmuel. This would imply that the Rambam indeed sees the verse "Place a king over you" as one of the sources of the law. It can be seen that the Rambam modified the words of the Talmud in his quote of these laws. "Shmuel says, The king is permitted to have everything written in the passage about the king. Rav says, This passage was only written to frighten the people, as is written, 'Place a king over you,' you should fear him. Tana'im had the same disagreement: Rabbi Yossi says, The king is permitted to have everything written in the passage about the king. Rabbi Yehuda says, This passage was only written to frighten the people." [Sanhedrin 20b].

The Kesef Mishna claims that the Rambam ruled according to Shmuel, whose opinion is usually accepted with respect to non-monetary laws, and also according to Rabbi Yossi, based on the principle that Rabbi Yossi takes precedence over Rabbi Yehuda. However, this leaves several questions. For example, (1) Why didn't the Rambam quote their exact words? (2) How do we know that the principle that Shmuel's opinion is accepted applies to the relationship between a king and his subjects, which does not follow the usual rules of halacha?

Next week we will propose a different approach to resolve these questions.

NOTES ON THE DAILY "DAF": Sequence in the Talmud

by Rabbi Yehuda Shaviv

Bava Metzia 22a is the site of the well-known dispute whether unintentional despair over a lost item has a halachic status of despair (Rava) or not (Abayei). An entire page of proofs are brought from wide-ranging and different sources, until the conclusion, "The question to Rava cannot be answered, and the law therefore corresponds to the opinion of Abayei" [22b].

This discussion gives a very good opportunity to see how the Talmud arranges proofs in a logical sequence. The first proofs are from the nearby Mishna. This is followed by a Bareita on the subject of lost and found. The subsequent proofs are from the Mishna, various discussions of the topic of despair, brought in the sequence of the Talmud (Pei'ah, Ma'assrot). Next are some sources from the Tosefta, and then finally we return to the subject of lost and found, from the Talmud itself.

This same point was noted by the Rabbi of Dinov, in his (extremely orderly) book about the laws of Chanukah: "All the quotes from the Amora'im with respect to the Chanukah candles appear... after the end of the Bareitot."

  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10

Добавить в свой блог или на сайт

Похожие:

“The Best of Parashat HaShavuah” Articles taken from list subscriptions on the internet, edited, reformatted and printed for members of Kibbutz Sde Eliyahu icon“The Best of Parashat HaShavuah” Articles taken from list subscriptions on the internet, edited, reformatted and printed for members of Kibbutz Sde Eliyahu

“The Best of Parashat HaShavuah” Articles taken from list subscriptions on the internet, edited, reformatted and printed for members of Kibbutz Sde Eliyahu icon“The Best of Parashat HaShavuah” Articles taken from list subscriptions on the internet, edited, reformatted and printed for members of Kibbutz Sde Eliyahu

“The Best of Parashat HaShavuah” Articles taken from list subscriptions on the internet, edited, reformatted and printed for members of Kibbutz Sde Eliyahu icon“The Best of Parashat HaShavuah” Articles taken from list subscriptions on the internet, edited, reformatted and printed for members of Kibbutz Sde Eliyahu

“The Best of Parashat HaShavuah” Articles taken from list subscriptions on the internet, edited, reformatted and printed for members of Kibbutz Sde Eliyahu icon“The Best of Parashat HaShavuah” Articles taken from list subscriptions on the internet, edited, reformatted and printed for members of Kibbutz Sde Eliyahu

“The Best of Parashat HaShavuah” Articles taken from list subscriptions on the internet, edited, reformatted and printed for members of Kibbutz Sde Eliyahu icon“The Best of Parashat HaShavuah” Articles taken from list subscriptions on the internet, edited, reformatted and printed for members of Kibbutz Sde Eliyahu

“The Best of Parashat HaShavuah” Articles taken from list subscriptions on the internet, edited, reformatted and printed for members of Kibbutz Sde Eliyahu icon“The Best of Parashat HaShavuah” Articles taken from list subscriptions on the internet, edited, reformatted and printed for members of Kibbutz Sde Eliyahu

“The Best of Parashat HaShavuah” Articles taken from list subscriptions on the internet, edited, reformatted and printed for members of Kibbutz Sde Eliyahu icon“The Best of Parashat HaShavuah” Articles taken from list subscriptions on the internet, edited, reformatted and printed for members of Kibbutz Sde Eliyahu

“The Best of Parashat HaShavuah” Articles taken from list subscriptions on the internet, edited, reformatted and printed for members of Kibbutz Sde Eliyahu icon“The Best of Parashat HaShavuah” Articles taken from list subscriptions on the internet, edited, reformatted and printed for members of Kibbutz Sde Eliyahu

“The Best of Parashat HaShavuah” Articles taken from list subscriptions on the internet, edited, reformatted and printed for members of Kibbutz Sde Eliyahu icon“The Best of Parashat HaShavuah” Articles taken from list subscriptions on the internet, edited, reformatted and printed for members of Kibbutz Sde Eliyahu

“The Best of Parashat HaShavuah” Articles taken from list subscriptions on the internet, edited, reformatted and printed for members of Kibbutz Sde Eliyahu icon“The Best of Parashat HaShavuah” Articles taken from list subscriptions on the internet, edited, reformatted and printed for members of Kibbutz Sde Eliyahu


Разместите кнопку на своём сайте:
lib.convdocs.org


База данных защищена авторским правом ©lib.convdocs.org 2012
обратиться к администрации
lib.convdocs.org
Главная страница