Game Changers for Teacher Education David Gibson Arizona State University Gerald Knezek University of North Texas Abstract




Скачать 58.57 Kb.
НазваниеGame Changers for Teacher Education David Gibson Arizona State University Gerald Knezek University of North Texas Abstract
страница1/4
Дата конвертации20.04.2013
Размер58.57 Kb.
ТипДокументы
  1   2   3   4

Game Changers for Teacher Education



David Gibson

Arizona State University


Gerald Knezek

University of North Texas

Abstract


This article introduces ideas for a new framework for teacher education based on three sets of forces that are radically transforming the way educational researchers and practitioners see their world: 1. Complex Systems Knowledge, 2. Global Flatteners, and 3. Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge. Complex systems knowledge is part of a new approach in science, a transformation in thinking now maturing towards dynamical systems and evolutionary computational modeling. The global flatteners represent economic game changers brought about by the Internet and the changed business practices it allows. Finally, technological pedagogical content knowledge is emerging as an important integration of knowledge and skills at the heart of advanced professional practice in education. These ideas are game changers for teacher education, preparation and continuing support.

Global Transformation


The global information society fueled by the Internet and digital media has produced a flattened playing field for vast numbers of people to participate in the world’s education and economic opportunities (Friedman, 2005). Ubiquitous low-cost access to information has opened the floodgates. Exemplified by carrying smart phones enabled with global positioning software, people can acquire personally useful information from anywhere at any time; where is the nearest coffee shop, what is the name of the street four blocks away, where are my friends now and where will be they in 10 minutes? The same device can show you a movie, tell you what the likely temperature will be tomorrow (or what it was 100 years ago), engage you with an animation of a complex mathematical curve, or define and spell a difficult word for you, then translate it into 40 other languages. Clearly, information is not the most important thing being learned in schools and colleges today, because it is being acquired everywhere, anytime people need it.


The age of knowledge workers, which had been forecast in the 1980’s, is in full swing. These global workers are the circulation system feeding a vast transfer of wealth occurring among countries, which were impoverished a few short years ago, but now increasingly own important stretches of the information superhighway. Technologies in the East, such as smart phones and high bandwidth networks, have allowed these countries to leapfrog into the future with new infrastructure that is more flexible and powerful than in the West. As a result, vast numbers of people can now learn more than ever before, with lower barriers to entry and access, and with more personalization and autonomy. People all over the world now understand that knowledge is indeed power and can be had for the asking. Universal education for all is now a global matter: the game has changed.


At the same time, a game-changing transformation in world-view has reached maturity in the sciences. Many of the sciences are converging on an evolutionary view of how new aspects of reality emerge locally from the surrounding and interpenetrating global complexity. The roots of this altered worldview seem simple; when something changes in a small way, most of what it was remains the same and some new small thing is added. As that new capability is consolidated and used, if it helps, it stays; otherwise it disappears. The criteria of whether it “helps” is determined by the encompassing environment, which passes harsh judgment on unhelpful things. Those are the seemingly simple roots of evolutionary development. Taken together, they imply a multifaceted and complex open ecology with the possibility of multiple causes, strange loops of feedback and reflection, dramatic jumps in behavior, nonlinearity and chaos. Computers now allow us to see, manipulate and understand this more nuanced world in new ways, and that is transforming the way the world does science. The new evolutionary worldview of complex systems is a result of science coming to grips with the implications of its simple beginnings in the face of errors that accumulate from applying those ideas to complex realities; it is an example of the structure scientific revolutions (Kuhn, 1970).


The revolutionary perspective is now transforming many other fields and education research needs to wake up and get moving in this direction; the game has indeed changed. The transformation, for example, is impacting the arts and humanities; fields which in some ways foresaw, and now celebrate the changes as part of a cultural shift toward creativity, building upon but completely renovating and surpassing the old worldview of simple, linear, positivist, empiricism (Kauffman, 2010). The grip of traditional knowledge authorities and the methods and ways of knowing that were developed for a paper-based world and that supported a learning economy, are giving way to more fluid, flexible, shared form of discovering and validating knowledge in a complex, open ecology of learning (Carroll, 2010).


Driven by conceptual as well as technological advances, which are entwined in a co-evolutionary dance that self-organizes and adapts each to the other at ever more complex levels (Dennett, 1995; Holland, 1995; Kauffman, 2000), researchers at the leading edges of the sciences, arts and humanities have been observing and documenting a dramatic transformation of society writ large. A new zeitgeist or mental model of the era has arrived. The change has come about largely because new ideas and methods bolstered by digital media tools are in the hands of creative researchers and practitioners. Their intuitions about structure and processes have been sharpened through vastly expanded capabilities of inquiry, scholarship, experimentation, and expression made possible by the new models and tools. We hope to broadly outline these models and tools here.


These facts have been chronicled, and their integration heralded, by writers from many fields: political and economic (Beinhocker, 2006; Friedman, 2005; Radzicki, 2003), philosophical and practical (Manning, 1995; Newman, 1996; Putnam, 1992; Tetenbaum, 1998), scientific and mathematical (Holland, 1995; Prigogine, 1996), historical and sociological (Diamond, 2005; McNeill, 1998; Wicks, 1998). Now is a good time to consider how these forces have created “game changers” for teacher education. This paper attempts to build a new vision for teacher education institutions, for discussion and elaboration, by outlining the game changers and synthesizing their implications for educator preparation programs.

Oddly out of step with the global transformation, educational bureaucracies across the world are for the most part still clanking along their tracks with rusty industrial-age models of authority, economy, and control. Reform movements come and go with minor impact on the norms, roles and relationships of traditional structures. This is so in spite of the scholarship from the cognitive and behavioral sciences indicating how people learn and how they should be trained for rapidly changing environments (Bransford, 2007; Bransford, Brown, & Cocking, 2000), how a generation of learners has been shaped by their digital experiences (Beck & Wade, 2004; Gee, 2004; Prensky, 2001), and how educational institutions can begin to rethink their role in society (Carroll, 2009; Davidson & Goldberg, 2009).


In educator training and research on educational systems, there is a need for better understanding of complex dynamic systems represented by learning organization entities such as learners, classrooms, school buildings, and school district systems (Gibson, 2000; Lemke & Sabelli, 2008; P. M. Senge, 1990). Some have referred to this emergent understanding as the “ecological” model of human development (Bronfenbrenner, 1979; Morgan, 1995). By whatever name we refer to it, if educators are going to join in constructing the knowledge and practice base needed by teachers and school leaders, it entails teacher educators learning some new basics.

  1   2   3   4

Добавить в свой блог или на сайт

Похожие:

Game Changers for Teacher Education David Gibson Arizona State University Gerald Knezek University of North Texas Abstract iconBS, 1990. Institution: Texas State University Specialization/Major: Education Honors: Summa cum laude ba

Game Changers for Teacher Education David Gibson Arizona State University Gerald Knezek University of North Texas Abstract icon1Joint Department of Biomedical Engineering at University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and North Carolina State University

Game Changers for Teacher Education David Gibson Arizona State University Gerald Knezek University of North Texas Abstract iconUniversity of north texas / Department of Sociology

Game Changers for Teacher Education David Gibson Arizona State University Gerald Knezek University of North Texas Abstract iconUniversity of north texas school of merchandising and hospitality management

Game Changers for Teacher Education David Gibson Arizona State University Gerald Knezek University of North Texas Abstract iconUniversity address: School of Teacher Education

Game Changers for Teacher Education David Gibson Arizona State University Gerald Knezek University of North Texas Abstract iconUniversity of North Texas-Department of Political Science-American Government

Game Changers for Teacher Education David Gibson Arizona State University Gerald Knezek University of North Texas Abstract iconTexas State University-San Marcos

Game Changers for Teacher Education David Gibson Arizona State University Gerald Knezek University of North Texas Abstract iconRam M. Pendyala is a Professor of Transportation Systems in the School of Sustainable Engineering and the Built Environment at Arizona State University. Dr

Game Changers for Teacher Education David Gibson Arizona State University Gerald Knezek University of North Texas Abstract iconState educational institution of higher vacational education Omsk State Technical University

Game Changers for Teacher Education David Gibson Arizona State University Gerald Knezek University of North Texas Abstract iconB. S. University at Albany, State University of New York, Albany, New York. Double major: Physics and Mathematics, Concentration in Science Education; (1991)


Разместите кнопку на своём сайте:
lib.convdocs.org


База данных защищена авторским правом ©lib.convdocs.org 2012
обратиться к администрации
lib.convdocs.org
Главная страница