Alejandro G. Abadilla (March 10, 1906-August 26, 1969), commonly known as aga, was a Filipino poet, essayist and fiction writer. Critic Pedro Ricarte referred




НазваниеAlejandro G. Abadilla (March 10, 1906-August 26, 1969), commonly known as aga, was a Filipino poet, essayist and fiction writer. Critic Pedro Ricarte referred
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Alejandro G. Abadilla

Alejandro G. Abadilla (March 10, 1906–August 26, 1969), commonly known as AGA, was a Filipino poet, essayist and fiction writer. Critic Pedro Ricarte referred to Abadilla as the father of modern Philippine poetry, and was known for challenging established forms and literature's "excessive romanticism and emphasis on rime and meter". Abadilla helped found the Kapisanang Panitikan in 1935 and edited a magazine called Panitikan. His Ako ang Daigdig collection of poems is oneof his better known works.

Early life

Abadilla was born to an average Filipino family on March 10, 1906, in Salinas, Rosario, Cavite. He finished elementary school at Sapa Barrio School, then continued for high school education in Cavite City. After graduation, he worked for abroad into a small printing shop in Seattle, Washington. He edited several section of the Philippine Digest, Philippines-American Review and established Kapisanang Balagtas (Balagtas' Organization). In 1934, he returned to the Philippines where he finished AB Philosophy at the University of Santo Tomas. Until 1934, he became municipal councilor of Salinas before shifting to insurance selling job.

Major works

Aside from writing Ako ang Daigdig, Abadilla wrote several poems and compilation of his works:

  • Mga Kuwentong Ginto (Golden Stories) - he co-edited with Clodualdo del Mundo.

  • Mga Piling Katha: Ang Maikling Kathang Tagalog (Chosen Works: An Anthology of Short Stories in Tagalog) - he co-edited with F.B. Sebastian and A.D.G. Mariano.

  • Maiikling Katha (Short Stories) - together with Commission on Filipino Language head Ponciano B.P. Pineda.

  • Mga Piling Sanaysay (Several Essays).

  • Parnasong Tagalog: Katipunan ng mga piling tula mula kina Huseng Sisiw at Balagtas hanggang sa kasalukuyang panahon ng pamumulaklak at pagkaunlad (Tagalog Works: Compilation of Poems from Huseng Sisiw through Francisco Balagtas until Present Times of Flourishing Philippine Poetry).

  • Ako ang Daigdig at Iba pang mga Tula (I am the World and Other Poems).

  • Tanagabadilla, Una at Ikalawang Aklat (Tanagabadilla: First and Second Books)- compilation of Abadilla's tanagas. In Filipino poetry, a tanaga is a short poem of one stanza with 7-7-7-7 syllabic verse, with an AAAA rhyme scheme. Usually, a tanaga is embedded with symbols. Tanagabadilla is a coined term consisting of tanaga and Abadilla.

  • Pagkamulat ni Magdalena (Magdalena's Awakening) - a novel which he co-edited with Elpidio P., Kapulong.

Ako ang Daigdig


According to Pedro Ricarte,[1] Abadilla's major breakthrough in Philippine poetry was when he wrote his poem Ako ang Daigdig (I am the World) in 1955. Initially, poetry critics at that time rejected the poem since it does not follow the traditional poetry that uses rhyming scheme and proper syllable numbering. In the poem, the repetition of the words ako (I), daigdig (world) and tula (poem) leaves an impression that the poet, Abadilla, is not himself. The speaker of the poem tells that he himself, his world of poem and his poems are united as one


Angela Manalang-Gloria

Angela Manalang-Gloria (1907 - 1995) was a Filipino female poet in the English language.

Early life

Angela Caridad Legaspi Manalang was born on August 2, 1907 in Guagua, Pampanga to parents, Felipe Dizon Manalang (born in Mexico, Pampanga) and Tomasa Legaspi (whom she hardly mentions).

However, their family later settled in the Bicol region, particularly in Albay. Caring—as she is fondly called—studied at St. Agnes Academy in Legaspi, where she graduated valedictorian in elementary. In her senior year, she moved to St. Scholastica's College in Malate, Manila, where her writing started to get noticed.

Angela Manalang was among the first generation female students at the University of the Philippines. Angela initially enrolled in law, as suggested by her father. However, with the advice of her professor C.V. Wickers, who also became her mentor, she eventually transferred to literature.

Writing

It was also during her education at the University of the Philippines that she and poet, Jose Garcia Villa developed a life-long rivalry. Both poets vied for the position of literary editor of The Philippine Collegian, which Manalang eventually held for two successive years. In her junior year, she was quietly engaged to Celedonio Gloria whom she married. She graduated summa cum laude with the degree of Ph.B. in March 1929.

After graduation, Manalang-Gloria worked briefly for the Philippine Herald Mid-Week Magazine. However, this was cut short when she contracted tuberculosis.

Achievements

She was the author of Revolt from Hymen, a poem protesting against marital rape, which caused her denial by an all-male jury from winning the Philippine's Commonwealth Literary Awards in 1940. She was also the author of the poetry collection , Poems, first published in 1940 (and revised in 1950). The collection contained the best of her early work as well as unpublished poems written between 1934-1938. Her last poem, Old Maid Walking on a City Street can also be found in the collection. This book was her entry to the Commonwealth Literary Awards, losing to Rafael Zulueta y da Costa’s verse Like the Molave.

Personal life

On March 11, 1945, her husband Celedonio and her son Ruben were attacked by a Japanese patrol in Alitagtag, Batangas. Though her husband died, Ruben was able to survive, yet his trauma had been so severe that he could not bring himself to recount the attack. This event left Manalang-Gloria a young widow with three children to support, which forced her to abandon writing and enter the abaca business, which she successfully managed.

Death

Angela Manalang-Gloria died in 1995.


Ambeth Ocampo

Ambeth R. Ocampo is a multi-awarded Filipino historian, academic, journalist, and author best known for his writings about Philippines' national hero José Rizal, and for his bi-weekly editorial page column in the Philippine Daily Inquirer, "Looking Back." He became the chair of the Philippines' National Historical Institute in 2002 and of the National Commission for Culture and the A rts in 2005.

Educational background

Ocampo was educated in the Jesuit-run Ateneo de Manila University from primary, secondary and tertiary levels but attained his BA and MA in Philippine Studies from De La Salle University, Manila. He took graduate courses in the University of the Philippines (Diliman) and later read for a DPhil in Southeast Asian History at the University of London School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS). His postgraduate work was interrupted in 1993 when he entered the Benedictine Abbey of Our Lady of Montserrat, Manila where he was known as Dom. Ignacio Maria, OSB. While he left the monastery in 1997 he still considers returning sometime in the future.

Columnist

Ocampo started writing for Weekend Magazine of the Philippines Daily Express in 1985 and joined the staff soon after. His column, "Looking Back", first appeared in the Philippine Daily Globe in 1987 and he compiled the material from these columns into two bestselling books: Looking Back and Rizal Without the Overcoat. In 1990, the Philippine Daily Inquirer took on Ocampo and his column. In December 1996, to commemorate the centennial of Jose Rizal, Ocampo and the Inquirer published a series of front-page articles about Rizal which won the first LRP Award for Journalism. The series was later integrated into an expanded edition of Rizal Without the Overcoat. [2] When Ocampo was appointed chair of the National Historical Institute, and later elected chair of the National Commission for Culture and the Arts, even President Gloria Macapagal Arroyo declared she was an ardent reader of Ocampo’s newspaper column, admiring his writings because he “makes history so approachable.”

Government service

In 2002, Ocampo was appointed Chairman of the National Historical Institute by the President of the Philippines, and in 2005 he was elected Chairman of the National Commission for Culture and the Arts, Philippines.[4] As NCCA chairman he was granted full powers to sign, for the Republic of the Philippines, Cultural Agreements with Pakistan, Vietnam, and North Korea as well as Executive Programs on culture with France, Mexico, and the People's Republic of China. While his NCCA term expired in 2007 he remains a NCCA Commissioner as NHI Chairman. Prior to these national government positions he served as Co-Chair, with Carmen Guerrero Nakpil, of the Manila Historical Commission 1996-1998.


He recently weathered criticism over his attempt to enforce the existing Flag and Heraldic Code of the Philippines by reminding artists singing the Philippine national anthem at international boxing bouts of the proper way to sing the anthem, and his controversial decision to paint the Rizal clan house green - to teach Filipinos the origin of the word "rizal" that came from "ricial" meaning a green field ready for harvest.

In academe

Ocampo, is currently Associate Professor and Chairman of the Department of History, School of Social Sciences, Ateneo de Manila University and Professorial Lecturer in the Department of Filipino and Philippine Literature, College of Arts and Letters, University of the Philippines (Diliman). He is also a member of the Board of Regents, Universidad de Manila (formerly City College of Manila) where he served as President and Vice-President for Academic Affairs 1996-1998. On April 23, 2008, Ocampo gave a lecture entitled "Bridging the cultural and generation gap among second generation Filipinos in Europe" at the Philippine Embassy in Vienna. His personal and official papers, notes and correspondence are deposited in the University of the Philippines Archives in Diliman, Quezon City. A collector of Filipiniana his extensive library is divided between: his home in Makati City; Holy Angel University, Angeles, Pampanga; the Center for Southeast Asian Studies Library, Kyoto University;

Published works

Some of Ocampo's more popular books (most still available in print today) include[10]
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