Period cooking gear. Utensils, trenchers, cast iron pots, wafer irons, salamanders




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Period cooking gear. Utensils, trenchers, cast iron pots, wafer irons, salamanders.


NOTE: See also these files: p-tableware-msg, feastgear-msg, trenchers-msg, iron-pot-care-msg, lea-bottles-msg, forks-msg, spoons-msg, horn-utn-care-msg, ovens-msg, spits-msg, wood-utn-care-msg, mortar-pestle-msg, nefs-msg.


KEYWORDS: pots cast-iron pottery clay grills trivets gratings wafer irons.


************************************************************************

NOTICE -


This file is a collection of various messages having a common theme that

I have collected from my reading of the various computer networks. Some

messages date back to 1989, some may be as recent as yesterday.


This file is part of a collection of files called Stefan's Florilegium.

These files are available on the Internet at: http://www.florilegium.org


I have done a limited amount of editing. Messages having to do with

seperate topics were sometimes split into different files and sometimes

extraneous information was removed. For instance, the message IDs were

removed to save space and remove clutter.


The comments made in these messages are not necessarily my viewpoints. I

make no claims as to the accuracy of the information given by the

individual authors.


Please respect the time and efforts of those who have written these

messages. The copyright status of these messages is unclear at this

time. If information is published from these messages, please give

credit to the orignator(s).


Thank you,

Mark S. Harris AKA: THLord Stefan li Rous

Stefan at florilegium.org

************************************************************************


From: ddfr at quads.uchicago.edu (david director friedman)

Date: 22 Oct 91 03:47:28 GMT

Organization: University of Chicago


Everyone knows that the fork was introduced at the end of our period.

In fact, the earliest known picture of people eating with forks is

about 12th or 13th century (I can check--it is shown in a V&A

pamphlet on cutlery that I have). There are two Anglo-Saxon forks in

the British museum, and the Cleveland Museum of Art has a Byzantine

fork that is quite early (10th century? I don't remember). The fork

does not seem to become a standard utensil until c. 1600, but it

exists much earlier.


Everyone knows that coffee has always been an important element in

Islamic social life. In fact coffee does not spread out of its

original home, probably Abyssinia, until about the middle of the

fifteenth century; Cariadoc (c. 1100) has never heard of it.


William de Corbie asks about the Swedish prejudice against eating

horse meat. I believe the same prejudice shows up in the Norse Sagas.

If I remember correctly, there is passage in one of them where

someone insults someone else by accusing him of eating mare's meat.

Does anyone remember where?


Cariadoc


From: tip at lead.aichem.arizona.edu (Tom Perigrin)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: iron pots

Date: 13 May 1994 20:36:18 GMT

Organization: Department of Chemistry


locksley at indirect.com (Joe Bethancourt) wrote:

> ALBAN at delphi.COM wrote:

>> [synopsis] bought a used pot, unknown past, how to clean, safety?

>

> So what's the problem? We cook in iron pots and pans around here all the

> time. You scour it with steel wool, oil it with olive oil, and use the

> silly thing. Just keep it oiled and don't let it rust.


errr, yes, but... there can be a few problems... it could have been used

as a solder pot, or coated with stove blacking to look nice. Some stove

blackings are made of black lead.


When I get a new pot or whatever, I test it for lead using a lead test

strip. You can buy these at various ceramic supply places. You get the

strip wet, and place it on the object... after a while a color change

indicates the presence of lead.


If there is no lead, I strip paints and blacking with paint stripper, followed

by a bath with Muriatic acid. The acid eats a lot of paints and iron oxide

but attacks cast iron very slowly. I then test it for lead again, just

to make sure nothing had been sealed below the surface. Then I season,

etc.


Thomas Ignatius Perigrinus


From: charlesn at sunrise.srl.rmit.EDU.AU (charles nevile)

Newsgroups: rec.food.historic,rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Request:medieval feast

Date: 27 Sep 1994 06:12:25 GMT

Organization: Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology, Melbourne, Australia.


[....]


Plates were certainly around - it is correct that trenchers were given

either to servants, or more commonly to 'the poor'. We use them quite

frequently, and we just use a heavy loaf, round and about a handspan or

more across, and thick enough to slice donwe the middle (more or less).


They work remarkably well, but people tend to eat them as they go, so

that they are both too full to enjoy the later and nicest parts of the

feast, and in any case have nothing left to put it on...


have fun


charles

ragnar hraldsson, new varangian guard, vlachernai garrison


From: hrjones at uclink.berkeley.edu (Heather Rose Jones)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Period Pot Use

Date: 5 Jan 1995 03:28:10 GMT

Organization: University of California, Berkeley


Thomas S. Arnold (tarnold at hamp.hampshire.edu) wrote:

: Does anybody know how they cooked over an open fire in-Period? I've

: tried cooking without an iron grate, but find it annoying...


I believe one solution was to use a trivet -- an iron ring with three

longish legs.


Tangwystyl verch Morgant Glasvryn


From: corun at access1.digex.net (Corun MacAnndra)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Period Pot Use

Date: 5 Jan 1995 06:36:36 -0500

Organization: Express Access Online Communications, Greenbelt, MD USA


Heather Rose Jones
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