Take a look at Roger Ebert's 2002




НазваниеTake a look at Roger Ebert's 2002
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Chunhyang, I noticed that Chunhyang wore different fabrics and colors, while Mongryong wears the same black and white outfit everyday. I found out from this site, that the white and black Hakch'angui symbolizes 'study,' and reflects a noble and sublime mind. Further, I found out that the wide skirt tied just above the breasts (seen in the first marriage nights scene) is intended to hide the woman's shape and promote modesty. I wonder, though, if there is any significance to the colors of the clothing on which Mongryong wrote and vowed his eternal love for Chunhyang.

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AUTHOR: blackmer

EMAIL: blackmerh@wlu.edu

IP: 67.76.90.228

URL:

DATE: 09/28/2004 05:55:46 PM

For what it's worth, somebody has posted to an Amazon list the comment "In Korean culture, the color pink is associated with trust and stability." Found via a search for 'color symbolism' AND Korean

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AUTHOR: leah

TITLE: The Subtle Differences

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DATE: 09/29/2004 01:01:04 PM

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First of all, is it just me, or did the guy singing in Chunhyang sound like Rafiki from The Lion King? Anyway, one thing that makes me wonder about the differences between Asian cultures is the way the women treat the men. Chunhyang was not nearly as submissive as I was lead to believe that women from Asian cultures/that time period would be. Even when it came to Mongryong, she seemed to control him. She made him pursue her, which would be unheard of considering her status as a courtesan's daughter. Her mother was also unconventional, especially when she gave the choice to marrry to Chunhyang. According to this site , women were considered to be nothing more than property during the Chosun period. So for the mother and Chunhyang to be so outspoken and independent is not typical of the time.

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AUTHOR: owingsj

TITLE: Vietnam

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DATE: 09/29/2004 05:10:32 PM

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We haven't talked about Vietnam at all yet, but I found a search engine type website that explores the country and its culture called "Viet Gate" I tried a simple search of the word 'food' and found several websites, just like you would on an American search engine, with recipes, pictures, and more. The country interests both because of its intriguing political background as well as its acclaimed geographical beauty. A family friend of mine is a travel agent who is enjoying rampant success in this part of the world, specifically Vietnam.

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AUTHOR: collinsa

TITLE: Chinese Delicacies

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DATE: 09/29/2004 06:50:28 PM

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After reading this article on Chinese delicacies, I felt like the typical Westerner: completely ignorant of other cultures. I have definitely heard many a story regarding Chinese people eating cat or dog or alligator; however, I never tuned in as to why. Seemingly, there is cultural significance placed on items of food we Americans would deem as off-limits. Just as we consider caviar, frog's legs, and pate delicacies, the Chinese consider beef tendons, bird's nest soup, and jellyfish a treat. Surely, the Chinese find some of our seemingly normal eating pattern bizarre. In fact, eating cat or dog is quite rare in their culture (like eating head cheese in the United States). Furthermore, much of what we would consider untypical food is actually used as medicine. This certainly puts things into perspective.


check this out: http://www.maxent.org/ch/exotic_food.html


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AUTHOR: arielle

TITLE: Reaction to Chunhyang

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DATE: 09/29/2004 09:03:37 PM

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Though Chunhyang is not meant to affect someone of my national and ethnic background, I was able to identify certain things that explain to me the importance of the story to the Korean culture. For example, the music had a distinctive sinuous wave of emotion (corresponding with high points of emotion in the movie) that is easily identifiable - allowing me to at least know that there is great emotion involved this story, even if I am unable relate to that emotion.


As for the sexual aspect of the movie, I see it as an extension of the emotional message the story is imparting upon the audience. Everything in the movie is quite intense, be it the sexual relations, the singing, etc and the sex scenes in the movie, in my opinion, are meant to graphically define the true meaning of sex, leaving no room for the audience to misunderstand that the two had an undeniable love for one another. Chunhyang and Mongnyong were so in love, they defy socially rigid class lines to be with each other, and one of the ways the movie attempts to show this extreme love for one another is through these scenes. One cannot help but notice these scenes, but we must understand that they are not meant to be vulgar, rather they are meant to illustrate love in a very apparent way.


In order to appreciate a different culture, a person has to remove all biases; he or she must forbid him or herself from judging or criticizing another culture's way of life - a very difficult thing to do. As we watch Chunhyang, it may be difficult to remove our cultural influences by which we are all affected, but what is intellectually attainable is for us to simply acknowledge there is an important message within the film.


We may not be able to - and may never be able to, for that matter - fully understand the affects of the underlying message of Chunhyang, but we have the ability to recognize that the "moral of the story" creates those affects, and thus fills an important role for this culture. In order to do so, it may be that we have to explore the technical aspects of the film (i.e. the intensity of the scenes, emotions, music, dialogue, etc) - rather than relying on the sociocultural messages inherently recognized by the Korean culture - to explain to ourselves what this film entails for this society.


On a personal note, prior to watching Chunhyang, I had spoken with my Korean friend, Helen, about the story because Dr. Blackmer had explained to us how renowned this story is to the Korean culture - and I wanted to see for myself just how well-known this story is. Within minutes, she had recited to me the entire story and what it meant to her, illustrating the significance of the story even to an American-born Korean.


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AUTHOR: arielle

TITLE: Response to Clint

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DATE: 09/29/2004 10:54:05 PM

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I wanted to respond to Clint's entry about Japan's move toward adapting to the American way of life...


It seems to me that America has established itself as the dominant world power so firmly that other cultures may view our ways of life as "correct". It is quite feasible to believe that other societies are molding their culture to mimic ours - the English language is unofficially recognized as the universal language of the world, so it doesn't surprise me that other aspects of our culture are beginning to invade foreign societies. If President Bush was able to state in response to the war on terrorism that those countries who do not side with us, are against us (a statement that implies that should you not side with us, you are not only against us but also that you are in the wrong), then why can't our society send messages to others that should they not mock our way of life, they are socioculturally in the wrong?


There are various motivating factors creating these changes, including the obvious economic dominance of our country. Other countries recognize how affluent our society is (or at least appears to be), and attempt to follow suit by doing as we do. It also may be that America recognizes other countries' willingness to follow our cultural lead and thus uses this to its economic advantage - for example, the popularity of McDonalds in Japan.


I don't think that Japan is the only country following this path. American influence is so widespread that it is impossible for the rest of the world to ignore it, if not succumb to it. Although I don't think societies will lose all of their unique features, we shouldn't be surprised when certain aspects of our culture appear in foreign societies.


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AUTHOR: ted

TITLE: Bell Metaphor

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DATE: 09/30/2004 12:11:55 AM

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During one of the intimate scenes in Chunhyang the governor's son likens his new wife to a "grand bell" and himself a "hammer" which will "hit the bell 28 times". I thought this was very humorous line in the movie even knowing that there are considerable nuances in the culture and language that we simply lose through the translation. I am curious to know the literal meaning of what was said. I also would like to know if anyone else is as curious as I am.


--Ted

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AUTHOR: shari

TITLE: Korean Clothing - White vs. Color

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DATE: 09/30/2004 08:53:27 AM

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Like owingsj, I also noticed the different clothing styles and colors that were worn not only by the main characters but also by the village people or commoners. I found the website that was suggested very interesting. It mentioned that women of the upper classes wore bright colors to indicate their social status, while commoners wore white. I would have expected members of the upper classes to wear white clothing being that the color white symbolizes elegance, grace, and purity; when a person wears white it suggests that he/she is neat, well-kept, and immaculate. I wonder… since a commoner is considered “lowly”, why do they wear such a clean and delicate color? In the Korean culture, does “white” have a different meaning? And do certain colors represent the different occupations, social classes, and/or titles of nobility?

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AUTHOR: owingsj

TITLE: choose

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DATE: 09/30/2004 04:29:21 PM

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In Chunhyang, Which is the more powerful force: love or commitment?

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AUTHOR: john

TITLE: Chunhyang

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DATE: 09/30/2004 04:33:29 PM

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While watching Chunhyang I began to wonder how similar the government of Korea was to that throughout East Asia. I guess I would like to know if situations portrayed in Chunhyang were possible throughout Asia or simply just Korea. I understand that this circumstance was very rare or even nonexistant but what type of control did leaders in other countries in Asia had.

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AUTHOR: carlos

TITLE: Chunhyang and Old English

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DATE: 09/30/2004 04:35:52 PM

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While watching Chunhyang, I couldn't help but notice similarities between the style of storytelling used by the Koreans and that used to tell English epic poetry before Donne. Both use a kind of rhythmic song that does more than simple storytelling can. I wonder, though, if as much is lost in the translation of the Korean language as is lost in the translation of Old English. Undoubtedly some of the metaphorical language is lost in translation, but how much? Also like this epic poetry, Chunhyang tells a story that is intended to teach its listeners a lesson, in this case about love and commitment.

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AUTHOR: leah

TITLE: Flogging for Entertainment

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DATE: 09/30/2004 04:57:20 PM

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The scene where Chunhyang is getting beaten is really disturbing. I half expected her to shout out "FREEDOM" like Mel Gibson in Braveheart. The thing that caught my attention the most from this scene, however, was the guy beating her. Were all "executioners," for the lack of a better word, in that time period that theatrical or were his actions exaggerated for the purpose of the movie. I understand that the beatings serve as a form of entertainment for the governor, but the dancing around was a bit much.
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