Understanding Information Technology for Managing Digital Collections




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Request for Addition of New Course


1. Number of course: INLS 465


2. Full title of course: Understanding Information Technology for Managing Digital Collections

Abbreviated course title (24 spaces maximum): IT for Digital Coll


3. Course start term: Semester: Spring Year: 2009


4. Activity type (select one): ( X ) Lecture ( ) Lab


5. Prerequisites (list all): INLS 461, Information Tools (pre- or co-requisite)


6. If course is to be crosslisted, name school or department administratively responsible:


Crosslisted with (course number):


7. Course credit hour type is: ( X ) Fixed ( ) Variable


If fixed, number of credit hours: 3

If variable, minimum number of credit hours: maximum number of credit hourse:


Is this course repeatable for credit? ( ) Yes ( X ) No


8. Course grade type is Pass/Fail: ( ) Yes ( X ) No


9. Does this course have any additional components? ( ) Yes ( X ) No

If yes, select all that apply: ( ) recitation ( ) lab ( ) field work


10. Does this course have restrictions? ( ) Yes ( X ) No

If yes, select all that apply: ( ) Advanced standing ( ) Permission required


11. Course description (no more than 30 words):


The nature of IT, its main components and their inter-dependencies, with strong emphasis on the characteristics that are most relevant to managing digital collections over time.


12. The course meets a General Education requirement: ( ) Yes ( X ) No


If yes, which?


13. Does this course replace an existing course? ( ) Yes ( X ) No


If so, which?


14. Semester(s) the course is to be offered (select all that apply):

(X) Spring ( ) Fall

( ) Every other spring ( ) Every other fall

( ) Summer I ( ) Summer II

( ) By request ( ) Unspecified


15. Instructor (list names or unspecified): Lee, C.A.


Is instructor a member of the Graduate Faculty? ( X ) Yes ( ) No


16. Brief justification for course addition (no more than 75 words):


SILS graduates who are responsible for digital collections will have to be conversant in various aspects of the associated information technologies, in order to evaluate the work of developers, delegate tasks, write appropriate RFPs, establish policies and procedures. The course will teach students how to think about entire information technology systems, recognize the inter-dependencies between parts of the systems, and manage those inter-dependencies (e.g., through use of open standards, change management, modularity).


17. Past history of enrollment (if offered as a special topics course or under an earlier course number):


Offered as 890-141 in Fall 2008; 12 students enrolled


18. How does this course articulate with the existing SILS curriculum?


There are many noteworthy complementarities between the proposed course and other core SILS courses:

  • It complements INLS 585 (Management for Information Professionals), by addressing many aspects of information system management that INLS 585 is not able to cover.

  • It also complements INLS 582 (Systems Analysis), which focuses on systems thinking for “design and development of information systems,” whereas the proposed course applies such thinking to systems and digital collection management, as well as investigating more low-level system characteristics (e.g., data types, character encoding, storage systems) that can play an important role in the implementation of systems for managing digital collections.

  • It complements and builds on knowledge gained in INLS 461. It places their more intensive hands-on experiences in that course into a larger context (e.g., explains the role that the operating system and file system play in managing files and associated metadata, which build on INLS 461 Unix modules; explains differences between structured/unstructured/semi-structured data and various roles of markup, which builds on INLS 461 HTML modules).

School of Information and Library Science
University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill


INLS 890-141 – Understanding Information Technology

for Managing Digital Collections
[Last Updated: 2009-02-02]

Fall 2008


Meeting Time: Wednesday, 9:30–12:15
Location: Manning 208
Credits: 3
Instructor: Cal Lee
Office: 212 Manning
Phone: 919-962-7024
E-Mail: callee [at] ils [dot] unc [dot] edu
Office Hours: Tuesday and Thursday, 12:20-1:00, or by appointment
Course Web Site: http://blackboard.unc.edu/

COURSE DESCRIPTION


The fundamental motivation for this course is that anyone responsible for digital collections will have to understand and be conversant in various aspects of the associated information technologies, in order to evaluate the work of developers, delegate tasks, write appropriate requests for proposals (RFPs), and establish reasonable management and preservation policies.

COURSE OBJECTIVES


Upon completion of this course, you should be able to:

  • Assess many of the opportunities and challenges associated with digital information systems that you have not seen before and explain them to those who have less technical background than you

  • Actively contribute to discussions about design, maintenance and changes to the information systems that support digital collections for which you are responsible

  • Read and understand the information technology trade press, recognizing opportunities and strategic implications for the management of digital collections

  • Contribute substantive recommendations for policies related to the management of digital collections



COURSE EXPECTATIONS


  • Complete readings BEFORE CLASS each week. Manage your time accordingly.

  • Written work should be of high quality. If you have concerns about writing, address them early and often.

  • Come to class on time.

  • Participate in discussions – counts as 20% of your total grade for the course.

  • Demonstrate that you have read the material, understood and synthesized it.

  • Practice "respectful and informed ignorance." Will Rogers said, "Everybody is ignorant, only on different subjects." This class will be most effective if everyone feels comfortable asking questions, so respect the questions of others. Bring to class your own informed questions about the week's materials (i.e. be able to convey how you've tried to understand the issues and what still remains unclear to you).

Special Needs: If you feel that you may need an accommodation for a disability or have any other special need, please make an appointment to discuss this with me. I will best be able to address special circumstances if I know about them early in the semester. My office hours and contact information are listed at the beginning of this syllabus.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS


  1. Complete required readings and participate in class discussions.

  2. Submit 10 of the 12 Weekly Assignments (skip two of them) to the Blackboard Assignments area by 5pm on Thursday of the weeks they are due.

  3. In-Class Exam on Week 13 (November 12).



IMPORTANT NOTE ON PLAGIARISM


It is very important that you both attribute your sources and avoid excessive use of quotes (see separate handout called "In Your Own Words"). Be aware of the University of North Carolina policy on plagiarism. Your written work must be original. Ask if you have any doubts about what this means.


All cases of plagiarism (unattributed quotation or paraphrasing) of anyone else's work, whether from someone else's answers to homework or from published materials, will be officially reported and dealt with according to UNC policies (Instrument of Student Judicial Governance, Section II.B.1. and III.D.2, http://instrument.unc.edu).


EVALUATION


Participation in class discussions and exercises: 20%


Weekly Assignments: 50% (5% x 10 assignments)


Course Exam: 30%


The most important measures of your performance in this and all other classes at SILS will be your ability to engage in challenging materials with your fellow students; your reputation for insights and professionalism among your peers and with your instructor; your integration of course material with the other things you are learning both inside and outside the classroom; and your ability to apply what you’ve learned in your future career. However, the conventions of academia dictate that I also assign labels (called grades) to your work on assignments and for the course as a whole.


Based on UNC Registrar Policy for graduate-level courses (http://regweb.unc.edu/resources/rpm24.php), both assignment and semester grades will be H, P, L or F. Few students will obtain an "H," which signifies an exceptionally high level of performance (higher than an "A" in an A-F systems). The following is a more detailed breakdown:

H = Superior work: complete command of subject, unusual depth, great creativity or originality
P+ = Above average performance: solid work somewhat beyond what was required and good
command of the material
P = Satisfactory performance that meets course requirements (expected to be the median grade of
all students in the course).
P- = Acceptable work in need of improvement
L = Unacceptable graduate performance: substandard in significant ways
F = Performance that is seriously deficient and unworthy of graduate credit

COURSE READINGS


The texts for the course are available for purchase from the UNC Student Stores in the Daniels Building (two buildings south of Manning).

Required Texts:


  • Campbell-Kelly, Martin, and William Aspray. Computer: A History of the Information Machine. Second ed. Boulder, CO: Westview, 2004.

  • Messerschmitt, David G. Understanding Networked Applications: A First Course. San Francisco, CA: Morgan Kaufmann, 2000.

  • White, Ron and Timothy Edward Downs. How Computers Work. 9th Edition. How It Works Series. Indianapolis, IN: Que, 2008.

SILS Reserves: Copies of the following books are available from the SILS Library on the first floor of Manning Hall (behind the SILS Library help desk):

  • Axelrod, Robert, and Michael D. Cohen. Harnessing Complexity: Organizational Implications of a Scientific Frontier. New York: The Free Press, 1999.

  • Bantin, Philip C. Understanding Data and Information Systems for Recordkeeping. New York, NY: Neal-Schuman, 2008.

  • Brodie, Michael L., and Michael Stonebraker. Migrating Legacy Systems: Gateways, Interfaces & the Incremental Approach. San Francisco, CA: Morgan Kaufmann, 1995.

  • Campbell-Kelly, Martin, and William Aspray. Computer: A History of the Information Machine. Second ed. Boulder, CO: Westview, 2004.

  • Farmer, Dan, and Wietse Venema. Forensic Discovery. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Addison-Wesley, 2005.

  • Garrido, José M., and Richard Schlesinger. Principles of Modern Operating Systems. Sudbury, MA: Jones and Bartlett Publishers, 2008.

  • Hillis, W. Daniel. The Pattern on the Stone: The Simple Ideas That Make Computers Work. New York, NY: Basic Books, 1998.

  • Lessig, Lawrence. Code: Version 2.0. New York, NY: Basic Books, 2006.

  • Messerschmitt, David G. Understanding Networked Applications: A First Course. San Francisco, CA: Morgan Kaufmann, 2000.

  • Messerschmitt, David G., and Clemens Szyperski. Software Ecosystem: Understanding an Indispensable Technology and Industry. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2003.

  • Petzold, Charles. Code: The Hidden Language of Computer Hardware and Software. Redmond, WA: Microsoft Press, 1999.

  • Shapiro, Carl, and Hal Varian. Information Rules. Boston, MA: Harvard Business School Press, 1999.

  • Silberschatz, Abraham, Peter B. Galvin, and Greg Gagne. Operating System Concepts. 7th ed. Hoboken, NJ: J. Wiley & Sons, 2005.

  • Tanenbaum, Andrew S. Structured Computer Organization. Fifth ed. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall, 2006.

  • Tanenbaum, Andrew S. Modern Operating Systems. 2nd ed. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall, 2001.

  • Tough, Alistair G., and Michael Moss, eds. Record Keeping in a Hybrid Environment: Managing the Creation, Use, Preservation and Disposal of Unique Information Objects in Context, Chandos Information Professional Series. Oxford: Chandos, 2006.

  • White, Ron and Timothy Edward Downs. How Computers Work. 9th Edition. How It Works Series. Indianapolis, IN: Que, 2008.

World Wide Web: Some class preparation requires review of information on the Web. Uniform Resource Locators (URLs) are provided with the reading assignments.

For the weekly readings, the following labels indicate where specific course readings can be located:

B = Book for purchase

R = Reserves at SILS Library in Manning Hall

C = Course site on Blackboard (https://blackboard.unc.edu/), where copies of some readings are available (under Course Documents > Readings)

O = Online through UNC license. NOTE: Accessing these materials can require you either to use a computer with a UNC IP address (generally, a SILS or UNC Library computer) or visit the associated sites through a UNC proxy server. See: http://proxy.lib.unc.edu/setupinfo.html

W = Publicly accessible Web


Week 1 (August 19)- Part 0 - Overview, Structure and Rationale


Discussion of the structure of the class, the topics we'll cover, and why the topics are important to understand when managing digital collections.

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