Lecture  Laboratory  Please check all that apply & specify if necessary  Internship  Practicum  Honors course  Studio  Other:  




Скачать 53.69 Kb.
Название Lecture  Laboratory  Please check all that apply & specify if necessary  Internship  Practicum  Honors course  Studio  Other:  
Дата конвертации30.10.2012
Размер53.69 Kb.
ТипДокументы
Bridgewater State College Governance 07/08-030

New Course Proposal Form


General Information


Course Title: Urban Disasters, Resilient Cities


Department: Sociology


Course Prefix & Number: SOCI 354


Credit Hours: 3


Frequency of Offering: Alternate Falls


Estimated enrollment: 30


Course Level:  Undergraduate

 Undergraduate / graduate

 Graduate


Course Type:  Lecture  Laboratory


Please check all that apply & specify

if necessary
 Internship  Practicum

 Honors course  Studio

 Other:      


Course Serves As:  A free elective


Please check all that apply & specify

if necessary
 A requirement for majors in:      

 A requirement for minors in:      

 A requirement for concentrations in:      

 A cognate for majors in:      

 A GER in the category of :      

 Other: An elective for the City, Community, and Region Concentration


Course Prerequisites


Please specify any course prerequisites for the new course, specifying prerequisite course prefixes, numbers, and titles. Also, please note if some type of written consent and/or matriculation in a program is required. If none, state “none”.


SOCI 102 and SOCI 206 and SOCI 290, or consent of instructor


Impact on Other Programs


If the proposed new course will affect any existing courses or programs, please specify what will be affected and please signify that approval has been granted by all affected parties. If none, state “none”.


None

Course Justification


Please describe the rationale for this new course. If the course is to be a new GER, please be sure to specify how the course meets the requirements for a GER in the category you specified on page one.


This course takes a sociological approach to urban vulnerability to various types of disasters and the factors that enable cities and groups within cities to rebound from those disasters. Although many disasters have natural components, social factors play a major role in the effects of those natural events. As the title of a recent book on Katrina suggests, There Is No Such Thing as a Natural Disaster. In his study of the Chicago heat wave of 1995, Eric Klinenberg notes that in extreme situations aspects of a society that are always there, but hidden, become visible. This course will attempt to make the invisible visible by using a sociological perspective to examine urban disasters and resilience. It will complement other courses in the general sociology curriculum and in the the City, Community, and Region concentration. 


Course Description


Please describe the course exactly as it will appear in the college catalog. Please check for complete sentences and grammatical errors as this description will appear in print exactly as it appears below.


This course focuses on urban vulnerability and resilience to disasters. We will examine why certain cities are more vulnerable than others and why disasters have more serious consequences for some groups than for others. In addition to examining the causes and consequences of urban disasters, the course will look at how cities recover from disasters and what factors help them to become ‘resilient cities.’ We will also look at social and policy aspects of natural and man-made urban disasters. Another focus of the course will be on the relationships between urban disasters and urban sustainability. The course will examine case studies of global urban disasters. 


Course Syllabus Draft


Please attach and send with this completed form a draft of a syllabus for this new course. Please be sure to specify what topics will be covered, how student learning will be assessed, and what course outcomes you expect.





I certify that my department has approved this new course:


Chairperson’s Name: Patricia J. Fanning


Date: 1 October 2007

SAMPLE SYLLABUS

URBAN DISASTERS, RESILIENT CITIES

SOCI 354

Instructor: Walter F. Carroll, Professor of Sociology, Burrill Office Complex, Room 101C

Phone: 508-531-2252

Email: wcarroll@bridgew.edu



COURSE DESCRIPTION:

This course focuses on urban vulnerability and resilience to disasters. We will examine why certain cities are more vulnerable than others and why disasters have more serious consequences for some groups than for others. In addition to examining the causes and consequences of urban disasters, the course will look at how cities recover from disasters and what factors help them to become ‘resilient cities.’ We will also look at social and policy aspects of natural and man-made urban disasters. Another focus of the course will be on the relationships between urban disasters and urban sustainability. The course will examine case studies of global urban disasters.


Prerequisites: SOCI 102, Introduction to Sociology; SOCI-206, Cities and People: Urban Sociology; and SOCI-290, Seminar: Social Theory, or consent of instructor.


EXTENDED DESCRIPTION:

This semester we will examine specific disasters in the United States, including the 1906 San Francisco Earthquake and Fires, the Chicago Heat Wave of 1995, the Terrorist Attacks of 9/11, urban poverty as a disaster, and Hurricane Katrina. We will also examine several cases from other societies and will those and other disasters in a global context in order to understand their causes and consequences.


COURSE BOOKS:

  • Required

  • Fradkin, Philip L. 2005. The Great Earthquake and Firestorms of 1906: How San Francisco Nearly Destroyed Itself. Berkeley & Los Angeles: University of California Press.

  • Goldberger, Paul. 2005. Up From Zero: Politics, Architecture, and the Rebuilding of New York. New York: Random House.

  • Hartman, Chester and Gregory D. Squires. Editors. 2006. There is No Such Thing As a Natural Disaster: Race, Class, and Hurricane Katrina. New York: Routledge.

  • Klinenberg, Eric. 2003. Heat Wave: A Social Autopsy of Disaster in Chicago. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

  • Pelling, Mark. 2003. The Vulnerability of Cities: Natural Disasters and Social Resilience. London: Earthscan.

  • Recommended

  • Vale, Lawrence J. and Thomas J. Campanella. 2005. The Resilient City: How Modern Cities Recover from Disaster. New York: Oxford University Press.

    • Many of the articles in this book were first presented in a Lecture Series, “The Resilient City: Trauma, Recovery and Remembrance” held at MIT. Many of the original lectures are available online (http://mitworld.mit.edu/series/28/).

  • Additional readings, available online. There is a lot of reading, but I think you’ll find it interesting.


COURSE OBJECTIVES:

  • Understand the social and policy aspects of natural and man-made urban disasters.

  • Examine public and private sector responses to disasters, including considerations on disaster planning.

  • Examine a variety of urban disasters and the responses to them.

  • Examine the causes and consequences of urban disasters.

  • Try to understand how cities recover from disasters and what factors help them to become ‘resilient cities.’

  • Examine the political, economic, and social ramifications of urban disasters.

  • Become familiar with social science perspectives and both basic and applied social science research on disasters.

  • Understand the political economy of urban disasters.


COURSE EXPECTATIONS:

You should attend class regularly, complete assigned readings and assignments on time, and participate actively in class discussion. Turn cell phones off, unless there is a compelling reason to have one on. Tell me if you need to leave yours on. You are responsible for all announcements and material in all classes. Be in class ready to go at 6 p.m. We will take a break midway through class.


I hope that we will have one or two Guest Lecturers. If so I will add them to the syllabus, adjust the course schedule accordingly, and post the revised syllabus.

Plagiarism: Plagiarism refers to taking the ideas – not just the words – of others for your own. Any sources you use, including printed materials and online materials, must be properly cited and acknowledged. If you are unsure what plagiarism is, see one of the web sites below.


GRADING AND ASSIGNMENTS:

  • Grades will be based on a paper or papers (25%), a final exam (25%), class participation (25%), and discussion questions (25%).

  • Papers: There are two paper options. You can choose to write two short (4-5 pages) papers or one substantial research paper. You must choose an option by January 25.

    • Option 1: For the first option, please follow these guidelines.

      • Paper One: The first paper is on either the San Francisco earthquake and fires of 1906 or the Chicago heat wave of 1995. In this paper you should provide a brief summary of the arguments of Fradkin (San Francisco) or Klinenberg (Chicago), discuss the most important aspects of their analysis, indicate the shortcomings of either, and explain what other else you would like to know about the disaster. Also consider whether there any aspects of this disaster that you expect to find replicated in New Orleans?

      • Paper Two: Compare two of the chapters in There’s No Such Thing as a Natural Disaster. What lessons, if any, can these cases offer for our understanding of the causes of the effects of Katrina on New Orleans or the reconstruction of New Orleans? Explain what the title of the book means, whether you agree or disagree with it, and why.

    • Option 2: This If you choose to write a research paper, please consult with me. This would be a substantial 10-12 pages research paper.

      • Format for papers: For either option follow these guidelines.

        • Double-spaced, Times New Roman, or other standard 12-point font, 1 inch margins

        • Heading: Name, SOCI-354, Date, Title of Paper

        • Attach to an email as a Word document or rich text format

        • Paste into text of email as well

        • Name on all pages

        • I encourage you to write in the first person and use the active voice.

  • Final Exam: The final exam will include short answer and essay questions based on the readings, class discussions and lectures, and videos.

  • Class Participation: This grade will be based on attendance, classroom discussion, and participation in small groups.

  • Discussion Questions: You should write two discussion questions based on the readings for each class. You should word process these. In the heading include your name, the date, and SOCI-354. For each question, also indicate which reading it is based on. In writing the discussion questions explain what leads you to ask it. You should email the discussion questions to me by 2:30 p.m. prior to the day of class. Send the questions as attachments (Word documents) and in the text of your email. Good discussion questions will not have a yes or no answer, nor will they be answerable with a few facts. They are intended to spark discussion. If your reading is from different sources, develop a discussion question from each.



TENTATIVE COURSE OUTLINE AND READING ASSIGNMENTS:

Date

Topic

Assignments & Preparation




Introduction to Course

Cities & the Potential for Disaster




The Roots of Urban Risk & Vulnerability

San Francisco 1906: 1

  • Vulnerability of Cities: Chapter 1

  • Great Earthquake and Firestorms of 1906: Preface to the Paperback Edition; Preface; Untitled Prologue; I Before; Author’s Note (345-346)

  • Optional: Resilient City: Introduction: The Cities Rise Again

  • Optional: Tierney, Kathleen. 2006. “Social Inequality, Hazards, and Disaster.” Pp. 109-128 in R.J. Daniels, D.F. Kettl, and H. Kunreuther. Eds. On Risk and Disaster: Lessons from Hurricane Katrina. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.

  • Video: “The Great San Francisco Earthquake” (56 minutes)




Cities as Sites for Disaster San Francisco 1906: 2

  • Vulnerability of Cities: Chapter 2

  • Great Earthquake and Firestorms of 1906: II During

  • Video: “The Mega Disasters: San Francisco Earthquake DVD”




Social Vulnerability in the City

San Francisco 1906: 3




Chicago 1995: 1

  • Heat Wave: Prologue; Introduction; Chapters 1-2

  • Eric Klinenberg. 2005. “When Chicago Baked: Unheeded Lessons From Another Great Urban Catastrophe.” Slate. September 2. http://www.slate.com/id/2125572/.

  • Short Paper Option: Paper 1: San Francisco option: Due




Chicago 1995: 2

Urban Governance

  • Heat Wave: Chapters 3-4

  • Vulnerability of Cities: Chapter 4




Chicago 1995: 3

  • Heat Wave: Chapter 5, Conclusion, Epilogue




New York: 9/11: 1




New York: 9/11: 2

  • Up From Zero: Chapters 7-13

  • Video: Creatively Destroying New York: Fantasies, Premonitions, and Realities in the Provisional City. Max Page. http://mitworld.mit.edu/video/7/




New York: 9/11: 3

Memorialization: Oklahoma City & New York




Natural Disasters & Social Resilience: Case Studies

  • Vulnerability of Cities: Chapters 5-7




Urban Poverty as a Disaster:

Dudley Street & New Orleans

  • There is No Such Thing as a Natural Disaster: Foreword, Chapters 1-3

  • Reread: Great Earthquake and Firestorms of 1906: Preface to the Paperback Edition

  • Optional: Carroll “Cities and Urban Decline”




New Orleans/Katrina 1

  • There Is No Such Thing as a Natural Disaster: Chapters 4-7




New Orleans/Katrina: 2

  • There Is No Such Thing as a Natural Disaster: Chapters 8-12




New Orleans/Katrina: 3

Towards Safer Cities

  • There Is No Such Thing as a Natural Disaster: Chapters 13-14

  • Vulnerability of Cities: Chapter 8

  • Short Paper Option: Paper 2: Due

  • Research Papers: Due




Final Exam




Добавить в свой блог или на сайт

Похожие:

 Lecture  Laboratory  Please check all that apply & specify if necessary  Internship  Practicum  Honors course  Studio  Other:   iconModification Request Applies To: (Check all that apply)

 Lecture  Laboratory  Please check all that apply & specify if necessary  Internship  Practicum  Honors course  Studio  Other:   iconC) abet outcomes to Be Covered (required) (check all that apply

 Lecture  Laboratory  Please check all that apply & specify if necessary  Internship  Practicum  Honors course  Studio  Other:   iconC) abet outcomes to Be Covered (required) (check all that apply)

 Lecture  Laboratory  Please check all that apply & specify if necessary  Internship  Practicum  Honors course  Studio  Other:   iconCpE 342: Real Time Digital Signal Processing Missouri S&T, Spring 2008 Mondays, 2: 00-4: 300 pm. Lecture: 104 eech, Laboratory: G3 eech

 Lecture  Laboratory  Please check all that apply & specify if necessary  Internship  Practicum  Honors course  Studio  Other:   iconWelcome to upper-division Honors at East Central University. If you’ve been a member of the Honors program since your first-year, this is a logical extension

 Lecture  Laboratory  Please check all that apply & specify if necessary  Internship  Practicum  Honors course  Studio  Other:   iconCpE 342: Real Time Digital Signal Processing Fall 2006 Lecture: 103 eech, TuTh, 2: 00 p m. 3: 15 p m. Laboratory: G3 eech, TuTh, 2: 00 p m. 4: 15 p m

 Lecture  Laboratory  Please check all that apply & specify if necessary  Internship  Practicum  Honors course  Studio  Other:   iconS. X 2 最新整合xp dvd版 -更新軟體選單改掉原本的bug+Ashampoo Burning Studio 10 3+Corel Windvd pro 2010 10 536+ghost xp sp3保留IE8 good乾淨+修改授權名稱+Visual Studio 2010

 Lecture  Laboratory  Please check all that apply & specify if necessary  Internship  Practicum  Honors course  Studio  Other:   iconLecture Manuscript By Iain Watson No. 961681970 Lecture of Tuesday January 11, 2000 Factors that Influence the Polarity of Metal Carbon Bonds

 Lecture  Laboratory  Please check all that apply & specify if necessary  Internship  Practicum  Honors course  Studio  Other:   icon1Environmental Laboratory 2Cold Regions Research & Engineering Laboratory

 Lecture  Laboratory  Please check all that apply & specify if necessary  Internship  Practicum  Honors course  Studio  Other:   iconВычислительные модули Accelrys Materials Studio
Данный пакет является коммерческим продуктом и распространяется только через дистрибьютеров. Последняя версия Accelrys Materials...


Разместите кнопку на своём сайте:
lib.convdocs.org


База данных защищена авторским правом ©lib.convdocs.org 2012
обратиться к администрации
lib.convdocs.org
Главная страница