Innovation Australia aims to promote the development, and improve the efficiency and international competitiveness of Australian industry by encouraging




НазваниеInnovation Australia aims to promote the development, and improve the efficiency and international competitiveness of Australian industry by encouraging
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PROGRAM PERFORMANCE

As at 30 June 2010, 25 customers had signed Commercialisation Australia funding agreements.


OUTCOMES

Commercialisation Australia has offered financial assistance to support 32 projects across a wide range of industry sectors, worth a total of $11.88 million, since its commencement in 2010.


Key administrative outcomes are:


  • Program Guidelines, Ministerial Directions and delegations approved 18 December 2009

  • the Minister announced the program open to applications on 4 January 2010

  • the Commercialisation Australia Board was established on 4 February 2010

  • first offers of grant funding were announced on 15 April 2010.


SUPPORT PROVIDED TO CUSTOMERS

Commercialisation Australia supports Australian companies through one or a combination of the following four funding components:


  • Skills and Knowledge

  • Experienced Executives

  • Proof of Concept

  • Early Stage Commercialisation.


Grant funding ranges from $50,000, up to a maximum of $2 million. Other than for the Skills and Knowledge component, funding recipients are provided with up to 50 cents for each dollar they spend on eligible project activities. The Skills and Knowledge component attracts 80 cents of Australian Government funding for every dollar spent on eligible project activities.


The maximum duration of a funding component ranges from 1.5 years to 2.5 years (depending on the funding component). If a recipient is in receipt of more than one funding component (or adds a component to their project during the period of their grant), their project’s duration will be extended by a period applicable to the new component added.


Case Managers are partnered with participants for the duration of their involvement with Commercialisation Australia. The Case Manager's key role is to guide participants through the commercialisation process.


Case Managers have extensive experience in commercialisation. Many have taken their own products and services to market, and have good networks within industry.


Case Managers assist participants by:


  • assisting them to identify the skills and knowledge they need

  • helping them access specialist advice and service

  • identifying and linking them with appropriate Volunteer Business Mentors

  • assisting them develop professional networks

  • providing strategic and operational advice

  • monitoring their progress.


Volunteer Business Mentors will be a key element of the tailored assistance Commercialisation Australia offers to its participants.


Small companies and people new to business often do not know who to talk to and how to make the business connections necessary to develop their intellectual property (IP). Volunteer Business Mentors are an additional resource who will further assist Commercialisation Australia participants in this regard.


The diverse range of Volunteer Business Mentors will have hands-on experience in building and/or selling a business, specialist domain expertise, knowledge of international markets and extensive networks in an area of expertise. The mentors will be well placed to offer guidance and practical approaches to assist Commercialisation Australia participants tackle specific commercialisation hurdles and to build valuable business networks.


GOVERNANCE

Ministerial Directions issued by the Minister under the Industry Research and Development Act 1986 provide the policy and procedures for administering the Commercialisation Australia program.


Commercialisation Australia is managed by a Chief Executive Officer (CEO). Mr Doron Ben Meir commenced as CEO on 19 April 2010. Innovation Australia (the Board) through its program specific committee (the Commercialisation Australia Board) provides the Program Delegate with technical assessments and merit rankings of eligible applications for the Commercialisation Australia program. In undertaking its role, the Commercialisation Australia Board considers grant applications under the program and provides the Program Delegate with recommendations as well as advice on other technical matters and program administration issues.


The role of the Commercialisation Australia Board is outlined in Section 3 – Corporate Governance.

CLIMATE READY PROGRAM


ESTABLISHMENT

The Climate Ready program is an element of the $240 million Clean Business Australia initiative, announced by the Government in its 2008-09 budget statement, to support innovation projects which address the effects of climate change.


OBJECTIVES

The objectives of the Climate Ready program are to:


  • support the international competitiveness of Australian industry by encouraging innovation through increasing research and development (R&D) activities, proof of concept activities and early-stage commercialisation activities that address the effects of climate change

  • generate national benefit for the Australian economy and wider community, through support for the development and commercialisation of new products, processes or services that address the effects of climate change.


Table 2.9 Australian Government budget and expenditure at 30 June 2010

 

2009-10

($m)

2010–11

($m)

2011–12

($m)

2012-13

($m)

Budgeta

37.57

18.49

6.53

0.00

Commitments

0.00

17.37

5.75

0.00

Payments made

33.40

0.00

0.00

0.00

a The original allocation for the program was $75 million. However due to the strong demand for the Climate Ready program, $3.5 million of uncommitted funds in other programs was transferred to assist.


PROGRAM PERFORMANCE

During the 2009-10 financial year, the Climate Ready Committee considered 123 applications. Of these, 31 applications were approved for funding, for a total value of $20.39 million.


Table 2.10 Climate Ready applications considered during 2009-10

Grant Type

Applications

considered (no.)

Applications

approved (no.)a

Applications approved ($m)

Climate Ready Large grants

31

6

10.84

Climate Ready Small grants

92

25

9.55

TOTAL

123

31

20.39

a The approved applications number does not include applications approved where the funding offer was not taken up.


Figure 2.6 Number and value of projects by project category 2009-10


Figure 2.6 shows application numbers and values for project categories. The greatest number of applications was in the reducing emissions category. The greatest value of applications was in renewable energy technology followed by reducing energy use and reducing emissions.


Figure 2.7 Number and value of projects approved classified by Australian Standard Research Classification (ASRC) 2009-10


Figure 2.7 shows application numbers and values as classified by ASRC. The research area offered the majority of funding was Engineering and Technology (70 per cent in total).


Figure 2.8 Number and value of projects approved classified by Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC) 2009-10


Figure 2.8 shows application numbers and values as classified by ANZSIC. The division that received the highest level of funding assistance was Manufacturing (61 per cent of total funds approved), followed by the Professional, Scientific and Technical Services (18 per cent).


During 2009-10, the majority of applications approved (52 per cent) were for projects that included research and development, proof-of-concept and early stage commercialisation activities. Thirty-two per cent of applications approved were for projects that included research and development and proof-of-concept activities and 10 per cent of applications were for proof-of-concept and early stage commercialisation projects.


Figure 2.9 Number and value of projects approved by turnover 2009-10


Figure 2.9 shows the number and value of projects approved by turnover. Eighty-four per cent of funding was provided to companies with an annual turnover of less than $5 million.


Figure 2.10 Value of approvals by grant size as a percentage of total approvals 2009-10


Figure 2.10 shows the value of approvals by grant size. The percentages are charted as: up to $250k-4%, $250k to $500k-43%, $500k to 1m-8%, $1m to $3m- 21% and more than $3m -24%.


Figure 2.11 Number of approvals by grant size as a percentage of total approvals 2009-10


Figure 2.11 shows the number of approvals by grant size. The percentages are charted as: up to $250k-13%, $250k to $500k-68%, $500k to 1m-6%, $1m to $3m- 10% and more than $3m -3%.


OUTCOMES

The Climate Ready program has only been in operation for two years. Thirteen projects were completed in 2009-10. Fifty-four per cent of these projects were found to be technically successful and progressing towards commercialisation.


Sixty per cent of the 87 active projects as at 30 June 2010 are either on schedule or ahead of schedule in meeting contractual milestones. A further 38 per cent of projects are on track but slightly behind schedule in meeting contractual milestones. Two per cent of projects are not meeting contractual milestones.


SUPPORT PROVIDED TO CUSTOMERS

Climate Ready is a competitive grants program which aims to support the development and commercialisation of innovative products, processes and services that address the effects of climate change. The program, which is closed to new applications, offered grants from $50,000 up to $5 million on a matching funding basis for research and development, proof-of-concept and early-stage commercialisation activities.


It targeted small and medium sized businesses, and offered two types of grants - small ($50,000 to $500,000) and large ($500,001 to $5 million). The small grants support small business, as well as companies controlled by universities and public sector research organisations.


The program opened for applications on 28 July 2008 and supported projects that address the effects of climate change. In response to the four funding rounds 311 eligible applications seeking $228.13 million have been received. A total of 102 projects worth $75.95 million in grant funding proceeded through the four funding rounds.


GOVERNANCE

Ministerial Directions issued by the Minister under the Industry Research and Development Act 1986 provide the policy and procedures for administering the Climate Ready program.


Innovation Australia (the Board), through its Climate Ready Committee, provided technical assessments and merit ranking of eligible applications. Applications for $3 million and above were subject to final assessment by the Board. The Program Delegate, based on the Board’s recommendation, made a final decision about which projects to support.


The role of the Climate Ready Committee is outlined in Section 3 - Corporate Governance.

Climate Ready

Case Study


GRANT HELPS CULTURE A NEW GENERATION OF VACCINES


Biotechnology firm Lipotek is researching a whole new way of using vaccines to prevent disease – as traditional vaccines do – as well as to treat complex conditions like cancer.


As Lipotek’s chief executive officer Dr Ines Atmosukarto explains, this new generation of vaccines is based on a better understanding of how our immune system works.


The Lipotek team has identified how best to target vaccines to the cells that guard our body’s immune system.


“Our designer vaccines educate the immune system to recognise and in some cases kill enemy cells, such as cancer cells,” Ines said.


“Using vaccines to treat cancer means the health system could hopefully do away with toxic treatments such as chemotherapy.”


With the help of a $500,000 Climate Ready grant from AusIndustry, Lipotek is now testing its first therapeutic vaccine for a sun-related condition – late-stage melanoma.


The grant helped Lipotek initiate its first phase-one clinical trial in Adelaide.


“This sort of government initiative is terrific,” Ines said.


“It helps keep our universities and our biotech research strong. The longer we can retain these projects in Australia, the bigger the return to Australian taxpayers, the community, investors, and shareholders.


“We’re a small company, so attracting government funds has been crucial. It’s often easier to attract venture-capital funding from the private sector if you’ve received government funding.”


Ines said applying for the grants was a very good exercise.


“It meant we were forced to re-evaluate our business and product development plans, when we might have otherwise focussed on more practical activities.


“It took us a few weeks to put together, but we’re finding that we’re using the information generated for the applications for a variety of other purposes.”

RE-TOOLING FOR CLIMATE CHANGE PROGRAM

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