City University of Hong Kong




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City University of Hong Kong


I
Form 2B

REVISED on

17 Jan 2012
nformation on a Course


offered by Department of Physics and Materials Science

with effect from Semester A in 2012 / 2013


This form is for completion by the Course Co-ordinator/Examiner. The information provided on this form will be deemed to be the official record of the details of the course. It has multipurpose use: for the University’s database, and for publishing in various University publications including the Blackboard, and documents for students and others as necessary.


Please refer to the Explanatory Notes attached to this Form on the various items of information required.


Part I


Course Title: General Physics I


Course Code: AP1201


Course Duration: One semester


No of Credit Units: 3


Level: B1


Medium of Instruction: English


Prerequisites: HKDSE Mathematics Compulsory Part or equivalent


Precursors: HKDSE Physics or Combined Science (Physics, Chemistry) or Combined Science (Biology, Physics)


Equivalent Courses: AP1200 Foundation Physics


Exclusive Courses: AP1200 Foundation Physics


Part II


1. Course Aims:


This course covers a wide scope of topics in physics including mechanics, heat and gases, wave and optics. Students will investigate the fundamentals of these topics and become able to apply them to solve real problems in science and engineering. This course, together with AP1202 General Physics II, equip students with a broad knowledge in general physics and the depth and coverage are sufficient for the students to pursue most of the science and engineering majors.


2. Course Intended Learning Outcomes (CILOs)

(state what the student is expected to be able to do at the end of the course according to a given standard of performance)


Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:


No

CILOs

Weighting

(if applicable)

1

Recognize and use appropriately important technical terms and definitions relevant to the major topics in the course.




2

Use simple calculus and vector notation to formulate and apply the physical laws covered in the course in concise form.




3

Apply physics laws of mechanics, heat and gases, as well as wave and optics in familiar situations.




4

Solve real and hypothetical problems by identifying the underlying physics and analyzing the problem.





3. Teaching and Learning Activities (TLAs)

(designed to facilitate students’ achievement of the CILOs)


ILO no

TLAs

Total no of hours

1, 2, 3

Lectures

26 hrs

4

Problem solving

6 hrs in class; 24 hrs homework (plus other hrs of self-study)

1, 3, 4

Laboratory

9 hrs in laboratory, 9 hrs preparation and analysis at home


4. Assessment Tasks/Activities

(designed to assess how well the students achieve the CILOs)



    Examination duration: 2 hrs

    Percentage of coursework, examination, etc.,: 50% by coursework; 50% by exam

To pass the course, students need to achieve at least 30% in the examination.


ILO no

Type of assessment tasks/activities

Weighting

(if applicable)

Remarks

1, 2, 3, 4

Quizzes

35%

These two assessment tasks constitute the coursework.

1, 3, 4

Laboratory exercise and report

15%

1, 2, 3, 4

Examination

50%





5. Grading of Student Achievement: Refer to Grading of Courses in the Academic Regulations (Attachment) and to the Explanatory Notes.


The grading is assigned based on students’ performance in assessment tasks/activities.


Grade A

The student completes all assessment tasks/activities and the work demonstrates excellent understanding of the scientific principles and the working mechanisms. He/she can thoroughly identify and explain how the principles are applied to science and technology for solving physics and engineering problems. The student’s work shows strong evidence of original thinking, supported by a variety of properly documented information sources other than taught materials. He/she is able to communicate ideas effectively and persuasively via written texts and/or oral presentation. 


Grade B

The student completes all assessment tasks/activities and can describe and explain the scientific principles. He/she provides a detailed evaluation of how the principles are applied to science and technology for solving physics and engineering problems. He/she demonstrates an ability to integrate taught concepts, analytical techniques and applications via clear oral and/or written communication.


Grade C

The student completes all assessment tasks/activities and can describe and explain some scientific principles. He/she provides simple but accurate evaluations of how the principles are applied to science and technology for solving physics and engineering problems. He/she can communicate ideas clearly in written texts and/or in oral presentations.


Grade D

The student completes all assessment tasks/activities but can only briefly describe some scientific principles. Only some of the analysis is appropriate to show how the principles are applied to science and technology for solving physics and engineering problems. He/she can communicate simple ideas in writing and/or orally.


Grade F

The student fails to complete all assessment tasks/activities and/or cannot accurately describe and explain the scientific principles. He/she fails to identify and explain how the principles are applied to science and technology for solving physics and engineering problems objectively or systematically. He/she is weak in communicating ideas and/or the student’s work shows evidence of plagiarism.


Part III


Keyword Syllabus:

  • Mechanics: Vectors and scalars. Resolving forces. Newton’s laws of motion. Conservation of energy. Moments and torques. Gravitation. Circular motion.

  • Heat and gases: Temperature and heat. Heat capacity. Latent heat. Thermal expansion. Gas laws. Kinetic theory of gases.

  • Waves: Traveling waves. Standing waves. Huygens’ construction. Interference, refraction and diffraction. Doppler effect.

  • Optics: Reflection. Refraction. Lenses.



Recommended Reading:

Text(s):

D Halliday, R Resnick, and J Walker, “Fundamentals of Physics” 9th Edition, Wiley (2005).

R A Serway and J W Jewett, “Physics for Scientists and Engineers with Modern Physics” 6th Edition, Thomson – Brooks / Cole (2004).


Returned by:


Name: Dr H F CHEUNG Department: AP


Extension: 7882 Date: 17 Jan 2012



AP1201 (3-3-4)

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