Inks, papers, calligraphic styles




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about it were thereby removed and noone could prove that it was a Legal

document anymore


By the way, concerning the seals on scrolls, a suggestion as how to do them

more period. When a scroll was finished, the scrib would then roll up any

extra parchment, put some small slits above them, pass a ribbon through the

slits and made a it so that the roll stayed tight, and then put the seal on the

ribbons (the ribbons were embedded in the seal). The logic behind this is

simple. Because there is now no extra blank parchment, nothing else can be

added to the document without first breaking the seals. You can imagine the

danger of leaving blank space at the bottom on a scroll which has been signed

and sealed. Any dishonest person could then add a few more terms to the treaty

or whatever, and with the seals already there, there would be no way of

disproving it......


Lord Vytas


Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

From: moore at mari.acc.stolaf.edu (Michael Moore/Peregrine the Illuminator)

Subject: Wax Seals

Organization: Baronial Colleges of Nordleigh, SCA

Date: Fri, 9 Jul 1993 17:11:40 GMT


Sigh... make a suggestion...


I have been charged with creating a document with a wax seal, so that

the Stallari of the new Principality of the Middle Kingdom can find out

how it works, if it works, how long it stands up to general use, etc.


I have some information: the book "The Romance of Seals and Engraved

Gems" by Beth Benton Sutherland (Macmillan, N.Y., 1965: Lib. of Cong.

65-10403) shows me various seals and seal rings, and "The Oxford Illustrated

History of England" shows specific documents with seals.


Some people have commented that their kingdoms use wax seals on documents.

_Please_ (as I kneel and plead) could you send me your suggestions, comments,

_Recipes for good wax_, or anything else you can? If someone is an expert,

but does not read the Rialto, can you send me their name/address/etc.?


As it stands, the concept of a slit through the parchment, with a ribbon/

thong through it, with the sealing wax surrounding the two ends of the ribbon,

seems the best idea.


I would love to have more information!

Especially to make things just that much more authentic. Rubber stamps

on period recreations just doesn't make the grade.


I Thank You, and the new Principality Thanks You.


Sincerely, Peregrine the Illuminator

(moore at stolaf.edu)

Michael Moore

1004 S. Union, Northfield MN 55057

(507) 646-3796


From: Tim at f4229.n124.z1.fidonet.org (Tim)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Wax Seals

Date: Tue, 13 Jul 1993 08:05:39


P> _Please_ (as I kneel and plead) could you send me your

P> suggestions, comments, _Recipes for good wax_, or anything else

P> you can?


Recipe for sealing wax? You can buy good sealing wax commercially;

Dennison #2 is pretty good.


P> As it stands, the concept of a slit through the parchment, with a

P> ribbon/ thong through it, with the sealing wax surrounding the two ends

P> of the ribbon, seems the best idea.


Don't use ribbon, use braided silk or leather cords. Roll up the bottom

edge of the parchment, punch holes through all the layers, and thread the

cord through that. Lay the cord across the reverse matrix, cover with wax,

and stamp with the obverse so that the cord is imbedded in the seal.


Tadhg, Hanaper

ocitor!tim.4229 at rwsys.lonestar.org


From: priest at vaxsar.vassar.edu (Carolyn Priest-Dorman)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Woven Seal Tags (was: Re: Wax Seals)

Date: 14 Jul 93 08:21:27 +1000


Unto the Fishyfolk of the Rialto, greeting from Thora Sharptooth!


Here's a subject dear to my heart--something nifty, period, and different to do

with weaving tablets. Tadgh wrote:


> P> As it stands, the concept of a slit through the parchment, with a

> P> ribbon/ thong through it, with the sealing wax surrounding the two ends

> P> of the ribbon, seems the best idea.

>

> Don't use ribbon, use braided silk or leather cords. Roll up the bottom

> edge of the parchment, punch holes through all the layers, and thread the

> cord through that. Lay the cord across the reverse matrix, cover with wax,

> and stamp with the obverse so that the cord is imbedded in the seal.


Another possible material for seal tags is tablet-woven silk. Intact silk seal

tags from the twelfth and thirteenth centuries display a wide range of color,

patterning, and intricacy. I made one once, out of size A sewing silk; it's a

ribbon about a centimeter wide, charged with the badge of the Order of the

Manche. Master Anton is saving it for a special Manche scroll.

*****************************************************************************

Carolyn Priest-Dorman Thora Sharptooth

Poughkeepsie, NY Frosted Hills ("where's that?")

priest at vassar.edu East Kingdom

Gules, three square weaver's tablets in bend Or

*****************************************************************************


From: Tim at f4229.n124.z1.fidonet.org (Tim)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Scrolls

Date: Fri, 09 Jul 1993 01:21:47


Iain Odlin wrote:

> I don't suppose some kind soul could post references for where new

> scribal types interested in authenticity more than Books of Hours pages

> can find examples of period "Award of Arms"-type 'scrolls'?


Hubert Hall, *Studies in English Historical Documents*

" " , *Formula Book of English Historical Documents*

Pierre Chaplais, *English Royal Documents King John--Henry VI 1199-1461*

Arthur Giry, *Manuel de Diplomatique*

Georges Tessier, *Diplomatique Royale Francais*

Harry Bresslau, *Handbuch der Urkundenlehre fuer Deutschland und Italien*

Ludwig Rockinger, *Ueber Formelbuecher vom XII bis zum XVI Jahrhunderts

als rechtsgeschichtliche Quellen*

" " , *Ueber Briefsteller und Formelbucher in Deutschland

waehrend des Mittelalters*

Cesare Paoli, *Diplomatica*


These are the ones I can think of offhand; no doubt there are more recent

works that someone whose academic access is more current than mine could

dig up for us....


Tadhg, Hanaper

ocitor!tim.4229 at rwsys.lonestar.org


Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

From: cav at bnr.ca (Rick Cavasin)

Subject: Re: A question on scrolls

Organization: Bell-Northern Research Ltd.

Date: Thu, 15 Jul 93 13:16:09 GMT


Greetings unto the folk of the Rialto from Balderik.


Balin asks about semi-transparent Vellum.


Although I've been learning to make vellum, I'm by no

means an expert in it's use (disclaimer).


I believe that the opacity of a vellum would be an indication

of it's quality. Transparency = poor quality, at least in a

manuscript context - some bookbinding vellums are semi-transparent.

I don't think

you *want* to see what's written on the other side.

On the other hand, when making books, you want the leaves as

thin as possible to reduce the bulk of the finished book.

Some of the vellums used in books were almost as thin as

onion-skin paper (I was once allowed to handle a 13th century

bible like this - talk about a humbling experience).

With such thin vellums, a certain degree of translucency is

unavoidable. The thinnest vellums I've made would probably

not show through noticeably unless backlighted (in which case

they show through quite nicely).


I wonder if the 'show through' you see in manuscript photographs

is an artifact of the photographic process. It could be that

under normal lighting, there would be no 'show through' on the

manuscripts in question.


My suggestion would be to visit rare book collections at university

libraries and try to examine as many different pieces of medieval vellum as

you can. When you get a feel for what the vellum you want looks like,

contact suppliers like 'The Bookbinder's Warehouse' (sorry, don't have

the address handy - think they're in New Jersey) and ask for a sample

pack. Hopefully, somebody, somewhere makes a vellum you like.

Keep in mind that vellum is very expensive compared to paper.


If you contact me in a few weeks (going away for a bit), I can send

you some addresses of vellum makers around the world. Some should

be willing to send samples. I can send samples of mine for what it's

worth.


Cheers, Balderik (don't buy or use the stuff myself)


Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

From: jliedl at nickel.laurentian.ca

Subject: Re: A question on scrolls

Organization: Laurentian University

Date: Thu, 15 Jul 1993 18:25:45 GMT


In article <1993Jul15.131609.265 at bmerh85.bnr.ca>, cav at bnr.ca (Rick Cavasin) writes:

Master Balderick scribed:

>

> I believe that the opacity of a vellum would be an indication

> of it's quality. Transparency = poor quality, at least in a

> manuscript context - some bookbinding vellums are semi-transparent.


. . . some deletions . . .


> I wonder if the 'show through' you see in manuscript photographs

> is an artifact of the photographic process. It could be that

> under normal lighting, there would be no 'show through' on the

> manuscripts in question.

>

I concur with Balderick on this one: I've worked with a lot of late

medieval and early modern vellum and paper, _and_ on the microfilms of

the same. It is my experience that the stronger lighting required to

get a clear, sharp image washes out the paper and shows exaggerated

bleed-through. While fine paper & vellum have some transparency in

any case, photography greatly exaggerates it. (Having compare a microfilm

sidy-by-side with the real thing, I can guarantee it!)


Ancarett Nankivellis

Janice Liedl

Laurentian University, Canada

JLIEDL at NICKEL.LAURENTIAN.CA


From: Tim at f4229.n124.z1.fidonet.org (Tim)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Proof of Awards & Scrolls: A Problem

Date: Fri, 16 Jul 1993 18:47:38


TA> Hmmm... You know, a Kingdom passport sounds intriguing. Were passports

TA> period, or are the exclusively modern?


Similar documents were done in period. During my tenure as Star Principal

Herald I had several occasions to issue passports to people travelling or

moving out of Kingdom; we have a fairly standardized formula for such

things. Below is the text of the one that I issued to Baron Master Robin

of Gilwell when he went up to the Midrealm to demonstrate Ansteorran

light-weapons fighting:


==========================================================================


Fra Tadhg Liath of Duncairn Star Principal Herald of Ams to all unto whom

these presents shall have come giveth greeting.


KNOW YE that the bearer of these letters ROBIN OF GILWELL Lion of

Ansteorra Master of the Order of the Pelican Baron of the Court of

Ansteorra Companion of the Order of the White Scarf of Ansteorra Companion

of the Order of the Star of Merit of Ansteorra Companion of the Order of

the Iris of Merit of Ansteorra Companion of the Order of the Oak of the

Steppes upon whom has been conferred the Award of the Sable Thistle of

Ansteorra in the field of Bardcraft and upon whom has been conferred the

Award of the Sable Falcons of Ansteorra sometime Baron of the Steppes and

sometime Queen's Champion to Her late Majesty Sieglinde II of blessed

memory upon whom has been conferred the Queen's Gauntlet of Ansteorra by

Her late Majesty Sieglinde II of blessed memory as aforesaid is a lawfully

warranted Officer of Arms of the Kingdom of Ansteorra bearing the title

RAPIER HERALD being of the rank of Herald in the Ansteorran College of

Heralds and a member of the Militant Arm thereof


WHEREFORE do we pray that all and singular of whatever estate or degree

unto whom he shall have come shall freely honestly and liberally render

unto him all due honor and precedence and such assistance succour and

comfort as shall be meet and according to his station and the esteem and

affection in which he is held by our dread sovereign lords Rowan and

Hector by right of arms Queen and King of Ansteorra in whose service he

does labor.


Tadhg, Star


Data per manum meam apud Baroniam Gradium ii die Julii regno tertio

Rowanis et Hectoris anno Societatis xxvi et anno Domini mxmi.


===========================================================================


Such things can add a little flavor to the soup.


Tadhg, Hanaper

ocitor!tim.4229 at rwsys.lonestar.org


From: dmb at waynesworld.ucsd.edu (Doug Brownell)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Calligraphy

Date: 24 Aug 1993 00:26:05 GMT

Organization: University of California, San Diego


Greetings unto the Rialto and unto Joakim Ruud from Thomas

Brownwell in Calafia, Caid.


The standard book on Calligraphy that I use as a starting

point is Marc Drogin's Medieval Calligraphy, publisheed by

Dover press, about $10. It is in print, and may even be at

your local bookstore. Marc outlines 10 basic hands, and

gives *tons* of photographs of documents in enough detail to

get all the interesting bits from the hands and their

variations.


If you want to do some library hunting, the subject 'calligraphy'

is usually useless (as you've found out). Try the category

'paleography' or 'palaeography;, the study of 'old writing'.

Paleography studies everything from the development of our Latin

alphabet from the Phoenecians and the Greeks, to the use of

abbreviations in 13'th C English hands. I have found some very

interesting books (I was looking for information on abbreviations

in Latin, and found some wonderful examples, plus a book that
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