Medieval Jews, Jewish personas




Скачать 228.96 Kb.
НазваниеMedieval Jews, Jewish personas
страница1/5
Дата конвертации14.05.2013
Размер228.96 Kb.
ТипДокументы
  1   2   3   4   5
Jews-msg - 11/30/98


Medieval Jews, Jewish personas.


NOTE: See also the files: Khazars-msg, fd-Jewish-msg, Islam-msg, Middle-East-msg, Arabs-msg, Palestine-msg.


************************************************************************

NOTICE -


This file is a collection of various messages having a common theme that I have collected from my reading of the various computer networks. Some messages date back to 1989, some may be as recent as yesterday.


This file is part of a collection of files called Stefan's Florilegium. These files are available on the Internet at: http://www.florilegium.org


I have done a limited amount of editing. Messages having to do with separate topics were sometimes split into different files and sometimes extraneous information was removed. For instance, the message IDs were removed to save space and remove clutter.


The comments made in these messages are not necessarily my viewpoints. I make no claims as to the accuracy of the information given by the individual authors.


Please respect the time and efforts of those who have written these messages. The copyright status of these messages is unclear at this time. If information is published from these messages, please give credit to the originator(s).


Thank you,

Mark S. Harris AKA: THLord Stefan li Rous

Stefan at florilegium.org

************************************************************************


Newsgroups: rec.org.sca,rec.heraldry,alt.heraldry.sca

From: sbloch at silver.cs.umanitoba.ca (Stephen Bloch)

Subject: Re: Jewish heraldry?

Organization: Computer Science, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada

Date: Sun, 14 Mar 1993 23:32:03 GMT


sbraslau at uhunix.uhcc.hawaii.EDU (Stacy Braslau-Schneck) writes:

>I read somewhere that Jews did not usually have a heraldic device of their

>own, but instead used the device of the town in which they lived - at

>least in Spain.


As I mentioned in another post a few minutes ago, the Jewish community

in a city of Christian Europe typically had a contract binding them

personally to the local ruler. The Jewish community was the ruler's

"property" in almost the same sense as his personal servants were. As

such, it makes sense for them to claim that bond heraldically.


I have seen the flag of the Jewish community of Prague (the flag

currently hanging in the synagogue dates from the 16th century),

which apparently was used whenever the community processed to the

castle to renew their contract with the King, to ask him a boon as a

group, or anything like that. (Pause while I go dig out the slide I

took of it....) This flag (or the part of it I can see in the slide

without using a projector) doesn't have any obvious symbols of Prague,

just a Jew's hat within a Star of David within a bordure of Hebrew

script. (Background maroon, charges and script gold.)


I think the main reason "Jews didn't usually have a heraldic device of

their own" is that very few of them were of noble families. Jewish

communities, and trade guilds with significant Jewish membership,

certainly had group heraldic symbols (which we would call "badges" in

SCA heraldry).


>As a Jewish persona from Spain, would I be allowed to use the real devices

>of Leon or Toledo or wherever? Or the "real" device of my local barony

>(which seems to consist of a completely un-period Hawaiian outrigger

>canoe, so looks very un-Medival, at least to me)?


Well, the outrigger canoe probably dates into or before the European

Middle Ages, but I agree it would certainly look jarring at an

allegedly European feast or court.


More to the point, read the article on "Flags and Banners in the SCA"

in Compleat Anachronist 50, "Armorial Display". It points out that

many Kingdoms (and perhaps Baronies) have agreed to allow any citizen

thereof to use the group badge in the "hoist" of their own standards,

where there would have been a national insignia in the Middle Ages.


Arval? Any words of wisdom on this?


mar-Joshua ibn-Eleazar ha-Shalib

Stephen Bloch

sbloch at cs.umanitoba.ca


From: hjfeld at acs.bu.edu (harold feld)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Jews in the Middle Ages (was:Religion, Sutton Hoo, and Bob)

Date: 15 Mar 93 00:44:50 GMT

Organization: Boston University, Boston, MA, USA


Unto all who read these words, greetings from Yaakov!


In article v081lu33 at ubvmsd.cc.buffalo.edu (Kenneth C Mondschein) writes:


> Firstly, I, like many newbies in the SCA, feel compelled to

>adopt a persona. OF course, religion was a *MAJOR* part of the Medieval

>mindset, and if I'm to have a realistic persona, should be a part of

>my mindset, too.

> This is where the problem comes in. I'm Jewish, and there were

>not many gently-born Jews in either the Middle Ages or early Renaissance

>(I'm not sure when families such as the Rothschilds began to gain influence).

>I would either have to choose a personae from the Middle East, perhaps

>Byzantium, or that really obscure kingdom from around the Caspian Sea. Ergo,

>I have a little problem: I can either be compelled to burn myself at the stake,

>or have my choice of personae severely limited.

> (Of course, I'd also be more than happy just dressing up in armor

>and concentrating on the stick jock aspects of this, but, hey, that's just me.


I feel compelled to respond to this, as a I hear it fairly frequently.

The range of the Jewish experience in the Middle Ages is far more

complex than most people believe.

In Europe, the Jewish experience is marked by periods of tolerance

and periods of oppression. Anyone who wishes to select a

European Jewish persona can manage to find a tolerant zone with

a bit of research, or can assume that they are living in one.

As a genearl rule, things are good in Europe after the Visogoths

and before the Crusades. The Crusades ushered in an era of the

erosion of Jewish/Christian relations and the Plague finished it.

It is after the Plague that the Jewish/Christian relationship is

characterized in terms of the ghetto and little or no social

interaction. At least in Central Europe. In Eastern Europe, things

go reasonably well until the Chmelniski Pogroms of 1648-9 (known

in Jewish history as Tach v'Tat, after the years in the Jewish

Calendar.) After this, things remain generally awful and oppressive

through to the Enlightment and the 20th century.


Of course, the above represents a gross over-simplification. My point

is merely that Jewish history does not present the uniform picture of

oppression and suffering most believe it does. Rather, the Jews swung

from the good times to the really bad times, evolving a richness of

culture and experience that are seldom appreciated today even by

Jews ( at #$! Socialist Zionists!).


Yaakov (who could go on at length but knows better)


Newsgroups: rec.org.sca,rec.heraldry,alt.heraldry.sca

From: mittle at watson.ibm.com (Arval Benicoeur)

Subject: Re: Jewish heraldry?

Date: Mon, 15 Mar 93 13:59:34 GMT

Organization: IBM T. J. Watson Research


Stacy Braslau-Schneck writes:

> >I read somewhere that Jews did not usually have a heraldic device of their

> >own, but instead used the device of the town in which they lived - at

> >least in Spain.


And Stephen Bloch writes:


> As I mentioned in another post a few minutes ago, the Jewish community in

> a city of Christian Europe typically had a contract binding them

> personally to the local ruler.... I think the main reason "Jews didn't

> usually have a heraldic device of their own" is that very few of them

> were of noble families.


Stephen, I know your learning in this field, but I believe you are

over-generalizing. The belief that Stacy mentioned in widespread, but

inaccurate. I had the pleasure of editting an excellent article on Jewish

heraldry in the Middle Ages, written for publication in the proceedings of

the Known World Heraldic Symposium (of the SCA) by Lord Eleazar ha-Levi.

He found extensive evidence of Jewish nobility, Jewish knights, and Jewish

armigers. His article appears in the 1989 proceedings, which are in print

and available from Free Trumpet Press.

===========================================================================

Arval Benicoeur mittle at watson.ibm.com


From: velde2 at jhunix.hcf.jhu.edu (Francois Velde)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca,rec.heraldry,alt.heraldry.sca

Subject: Re: Jewish heraldry?

Date: 15 Mar 1993 09:39:22 -0500

Organization: Homewood Academic Computing, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Md, USA


sbloch at silver.cs.umanitoba.ca (Stephen Bloch) writes:

>sbraslau at uhunix.uhcc.hawaii.EDU (Stacy Braslau-Schneck) writes:

>>I read somewhere that Jews did not usually have a heraldic device of their

>>own, but instead used the device of the town in which they lived - at

>>least in Spain.

>

>As I mentioned in another post a few minutes ago, the Jewish community

>in a city of Christian Europe typically had a contract binding them

>personally to the local ruler. The Jewish community was the ruler's

>"property" in almost the same sense as his personal servants were. As

>such, it makes sense for them to claim that bond heraldically.

>

>[flag of the community of Prague described]

>

>I think the main reason "Jews didn't usually have a heraldic device of

>their own" is that very few of them were of noble families. Jewish

>communities, and trade guilds with significant Jewish membership,

>certainly had group heraldic symbols (which we would call "badges" in

>SCA heraldry).


Once again, the right to bear arms was not limited to nobles: so Jews,

without being nobles, could bear arms, at least in principle.


In practice I can give two examples of coats of arms belonging to Jews:


1) Kalonymos ben Todros, a.k.a. Momet Tauros, living in Narbonne around

1300, had a lion rampant on his shield.


2) Nostradamus, the famous astrologer, bore: Gules, a wheel broken

between each spoke or. Since the color of the charge was too clear a

reminder of the bearer's origins, a descendant had the arms changed to

quarterly, 1 and 4 Argent a wheel sabel; 2 and 3 Argent an eagle's head

erased sable.


Reference: R. Mathieu (1946), _Le Systeme Heraldique Francais_, p. 41.


--


Francois Velde


Article 35299 of rec.org.sca:

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca,rec.heraldry,alt.heraldry.sca

From: sbloch at silver.cs.umanitoba.ca (Stephen Bloch)

Subject: Re: Jewish heraldry?

Organization: Computer Science, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada


Arval Benicoeur and Francois Velde very gently correct my

overgeneralizations:

JiE>I think the main reason "Jews didn't usually have a heraldic device of

JiE>their own" is that very few of them were of noble families. Jewish

JiE>communities, and trade guilds with significant Jewish membership,

JiE>certainly had group heraldic symbols (which we would call "badges" in

JiE>SCA heraldry).


FV>Once again, the right to bear arms was not limited to nobles: so Jews,

FV>without being nobles, could bear arms, at least in principle.


I had meant to say something to this effect, but it got lost between

conception and keyboard. My IMPRESSION is that in most of Europe, in

most of the Middle Ages, there was no formal prohibition against

commoners bearing heraldic arms, but the entities who had reason to do

so were predominantly either noble families, professional guilds, or

"communities", e.g. the city of Hamburg or the Jewish community of

Prague. Owain Oxherd (or even Sam Shopkeeper) had no need for a

personal or family coat of arms, and wouldn't be likely to go to the

trouble of designing, emblazoning, and publicizing one.


FV>In practice I can give two examples of coats of arms belonging to Jews:

...


There are at least two examples reprinted (in B&W, alas) in Rudin's

"History of Jewish Costume". One is an heraldic device, painted on a

shield, whose major charges are three Jewish hats (the sailor-style

version, not the broad-brimmed and spiked version); Rudin suggests

this device was not actually of a Jewish family but rather a cant on

the family name "Jude". The second is a seal, probably of a Jewish

family or individual, consisting of three Jewish hats (broad-brimmed,

spiked and balled) conjoined at the balls.


Arval said something about there being no lack of Jewish nobles,

Jewish knights, etc. in the historical record, and recommended an

article on the subject in the 1989 KWHS Proceedings. I've heard of

this article, and have intended to acquire and read it for some

time, but for a deplorable shortage of round tuits. Thanks for

reminding me about it.


mar-Joshua ibn-Eleazar ha-Shalib

--

Stephen Bloch

sbloch at cs.umanitoba.ca


Newsgroups: rec.org.sca,rec.heraldry,alt.heraldry.sca

From: nusbache at epas.utoronto.ca (Aryk Nusbacher)

Subject: Re: Jewish heraldry?

Organization: University of Toronto - VELUT ABOR AEVO

Date: Tue, 16 Mar 1993 02:26:01 GMT


In article sbloch at silver.cs.umanitoba.ca (Stephen Bloch) writes:


>... Owain Oxherd (or even Sam Shopkeeper) had no need for a

>personal or family coat of arms, and wouldn't be likely to go to the

>trouble of designing, emblazoning, and publicizing one.


Nobody told Sam Shopkeeper how unlikely it was ... bourgeois families,

including Jews, went to the trouble of designing, emblazoning and

publicising coats of arms throughout the Middle Ages and Renaissance.

Italian jewry was notably rich in heraldry.


Aryk Nusbacher


From: Suze.Hammond at f56.n105.z1.fidonet.org (Suze Hammond)
  1   2   3   4   5

Добавить в свой блог или на сайт

Похожие:

Medieval Jews, Jewish personas iconNew Jews: The End of the Jewish Diaspora

Medieval Jews, Jewish personas iconValues, Modes, Styles and Personas

Medieval Jews, Jewish personas icon1 When the Hating is done by jews instead of to them: Andrew B. Adler cf Amish, Innocence of Muslims and Pussy Riot

Medieval Jews, Jewish personas iconThe Source of Jewish Values

Medieval Jews, Jewish personas iconPart One Jewish Jewels and Diamonds

Medieval Jews, Jewish personas iconБат Йеор «зимми»
«The Dhimmi: Christians & Jews Under Islam»: Fairleigh Dickinson University Press; Лондон; 1985

Medieval Jews, Jewish personas iconБат Йеор «зимми»
«The Dhimmi: Christians & Jews Under Islam»: Fairleigh Dickinson University Press; Лондон; 1985

Medieval Jews, Jewish personas iconVol. Jewish Activities in the United States

Medieval Jews, Jewish personas iconTorah Concepts: the source of Jewish values Book IV

Medieval Jews, Jewish personas iconThe Medieval world and Beyond


Разместите кнопку на своём сайте:
lib.convdocs.org


База данных защищена авторским правом ©lib.convdocs.org 2012
обратиться к администрации
lib.convdocs.org
Главная страница