2. For your convenience, I have copied and/or adapted most of the mla bibliographic formats from Purdue’s Web Site




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MLA Bibliographic Formats for Bibliographies & Works Cited Entries Research Section - (Page ), RH #4B AP/H-IV

MLA Bibliographic Formats for Entries in Bibliographies and Works Cited

The Modern Language Association (MLA) is an organization of teachers and scholars devoted to the study of language and literature. MLA style has been widely adopted by academic journals, schools, and instructors. Since its initial publication, the MLA Style Manual has become the predominant style guide for use in the Humanities in the United States, and is commonly used in Canada and other countries worldwide. We will be using MLA style.


1. Consider using the Research and Documenting resource of Purdue's Online Writing Lab (OWL) to help you use the MLA (Modern Language Association) style/formatting for documenting your research. Here’s how to get to it:




2. For your convenience, I have copied and/or adapted most of the MLA bibliographic formats from Purdue’s Web Site.
3. You may wish to use a web Citation Maker. Do so at your own risk. You have to understand enough of the nuances of the MLA style to understand how to use the Citation Maker properly. Here’s a link to one Citation Maker:
http://www.oslis.k12.or.us/MLACitations/secondary/index.php
4. NC Wiseowl (via Gale InfoTrac and EBSCOHost) offers sample citations for the articles they allow you to, but they tend to be wrong. Do not use them!
5. Place each MLA bibliographic entry (also called a source) on a separate 3 X 5” index card. That way they’re easy to alphabetize. (Of course, they’re also easy to lose, so you might want to type a list of these entries and then you can reorganize them alphabetically by copying, cutting, and pasting.)

6. Below is a sample source /MLA bibliographic entry. Note the number in the right-hand corner. You will not number these cards until after you have most of the sources you want so that you can first alphabetize all of the sources.


15

[15 indicates that this is the 15th source card/bibliographic entry in your alphabetical ordered list.]


Manse, Tom. A Crisis in the Making: Delayed Stress Syndrome in Viet Nam Vets. New York: Allen

Press, Inc., 2004. Print.


322.11M [Call Number] OHS Media Center [Source Location]


Hanging

Indent


Not part of

biblio. entry


Note that you should include the call number and the name of the Media Center with book bibliographic entries so that if you later need to go back to the book, you want have to puzzle over what library you checked out the book from. NOTE: The call number and name of the library are not part of the MLA bibliographic entry!


7. Review the following basic rules before starting your bibliographic entries and before submitting them for a grade:

  • Alphabetize each entry in a works cited list by the first letter, ignoring the articles A, An, and The.

    • When you alphabetize your MLA bibliographic source cards, follow the same procedures.

  • Follow directions for a correct hanging indent: Begin flush left (at the left margin). Subsequent lines are indented. Do not break lines before reaching the right margin. This is a "hanging indent." Your computer can do it for you.
    • Do not indent the first line.
    • Indent subsequent lines of entries one-half inch.
          • Pay attention to the correct order of elements in an entry.
          • Names: Author names should appear as they do on the title page, whether spelled out or using initials. The first author is listed last name first, but any other authors appear in normal order. Name of the editor, compiler, or translator of a book (if applicable and if not cited earlier), proceeded by any appropriate abbreviation, such as Ed.
          • Titles:
    • Capitalize all words in a title except the following words (unless they are the first or last word):
      • FANBOYS (coordinating conjunctions): for, and, nor, but, or, yet, so
      • prepositions: in, to, from, of, by, beside, between, against, among . . .
        • Prepositions show relationships between a noun or pronoun to other words in a sentence. Most of the time, you can determine if a word is preposition if follows the birdhouse rule: a bird can fly to the birdhouse, by the birdhouse, in the birdhouse, between the birdhouse(s), from the birdhouse [Of is one of the prepositions that does not work with this rule.]
        • The words before, while, after can be prepositions or subordinating conjunctions.
          • When they are prepositions used in the middle of a title, they are not capitalized:
            • The World before Time
          • When they are subordinating conjunctions in a title, they are capitalized
            • We Will Leave Before the Monsters Arrive (Here, before introduces a clause)
      • articles: a, an, the
      • to in an infinitive (as in How to Play Chess)
    • Use the appropriate formatting for marking a title:
      • Titles of whole works (Books, Periodicals, Web Sites, Films, TV/Radio Programs) are italicized or underlined. Do not use both.
      • Titles of parts of works (titles of articles in periodicals, songs on a CD, chapters in a book) are placed within quotation marks.
          • Dates for Periodicals: Use the order: day month year. Shorten the month to the standard 3- or 4- letter abbreviation. If no publication date is available, use "n.d." in place of date.
          • Publisher for Books: For location of the publisher, list only the city if the city is well known; if not, list city, state (use the two-letter abbreviation for the state); do not include the street address.
          • Pay attention to all punctuation marks – or absence thereof – and underlining.
          • Always double space.
          • P R O O F R E A D ! ! !


8. Templates for/Samples of MLA Entries

Most Nonperiodical Print Sources [Books]: Pages 3-4

Book with one author P. 3


Book with Editor (Anthologies/Collections) P. 3


Book with Multiple Authors P. 3


Book with Multiple Editors (Anthologies/Collections) P. 3


Book with corporate (group/organization) author P. 3


Book with no author P. 3


Encyclopedias (Articles and Entries) P. 4


Dictionaries (Entries) P. 4


Government Publications P. 4

Common Non-Print/Non-Web Sources: Recorded Movies & TV Programs [VHS Videos/DVDs] P. 4


Personal/Telephone Interviews P. 5


Print Periodicals P. 5

(articles in actual print magazines, journals, newspapers):


Online Sources from Online Database/Subscription Service [NC Wiseowl and NC Live.org]: PP. 5-7

(online articles in magazines, journals, newspapers; online books; online chapters from books, etc.)


Common Web (Electronic) Sources P. 8

Special Book Situations (Citing Translated Books, Multivolume Works, Introductions) P. 8


Other Non-Print Sources P.8

Nonperiodical “Hard Copy” or Print Sources [Books]

First or single author's name is written last name, first name. The basic form for a book citation is as follows:


Lastname, Firstname. Title of Book. Place of Publication: Publisher, Year of Publication. Medium of Publication.


Book with One Author

Gleick, James. Chaos: Making a New Science. New York: Penguin Books, 1987. Print.


Henley, Patricia. The Hummingbird House. Denver: MacMurray, 1999. Print.


Book with One Editor (Anthology or Collection of Essays)*


List by editor, followed by a comma and "ed."


Peterson, Nancy J., ed. Toni Morrison: Critical and Theoretical Approaches. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins UP, 1997. Print.


*Once you start taking notes, you may need to cite individual entries for chapters or essays you use from an anthology because each chapter or essay is a separate source.


An Entry of One Chapter or Essay Referenced from an Anthology

Lastname, First name. "Title of Essay." Title of Collection. Ed. Editor's Name(s). Place of Publication: Publisher, Year.

Pages. Print.


Smith, Barney. “Death Revised.” Capital Punishment: A Collection of Essays. Ed. Sally Duggins. New York, Knopf,

2006. Print.


Book with More Than One Author

First author name is written last name first; subsequent author names are written first name last name.


Gillespie, Paula, and Neal Lerner. The Allyn and Bacon Guide to Peer Tutoring. Boston: Allyn, 2000. Print.


If there are more than three authors, you may list only the first author followed by the phrase et al. (the abbreviation for the Latin phrase "and others"; no period after "et") in place of the other authors' names, or you may list all the authors in the order in which their names appear on the title page.


Wysocki, Anne Frances, et al. Writing New Media: Theory and Applications for Expanding the Teaching of Composition.

Logan, UT: Utah State UP, 2004.

or

Wysocki, Anne Frances, Johndan Johnson-Eilola, Cynthia L. Selfe, and Geoffrey Sirc. Writing New Media: Theory

and Applications for Expanding the Teaching of Composition. Logan, UT: Utah State UP, 2004. Print.


Book with More Than One Editor (Anthology or Collection)


List by editors, followed by a comma and "eds." for multiple editors.


Hill, Charles A. and Marguerite Helmers, eds. Defining Visual Rhetorics. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates,

2004. Print.


Two or More Books by the Same Author

After the first listing of the author's name, use three hyphens and a period instead of the author's name [on your Works Cited]; on a single card, you should write out the author. List books alphabetically by title.


Palmer, William J. Dickens and New Historicism. New York: St. Martin's, 1997. Print.


---. The Films of the Eighties: A Social History. Carbondale: Southern Illinois UP, 1993. Print.*


*You won’t do this on your index source card; on the card, keep writing the name. In your Works Cited, on your paper, use the hyphens to replace the name after you have used it for the first source by this author.


Book by a Corporate Author A corporate author may be a commission, a committee, or any group whose individual members are not identified on the title page:


American Allergy Association. Allergies in Children. New York: Random, 1998. Print.


Book with No Author List and alphabetize by the title of the book.

Encyclopedia of Indiana. New York: Somerset, 1993. Print.


New York Public Library American History Desk Reference. New York: Macmillan, 1997. Print.

Encyclopedia articles in your Works Cited: [REMEMBER: NO GENERAL ENCYCLOPEDIAS!]

Encyclopedia Article without author (most common):

“Title of Article or Entry.” Title of Encyclopedia. Editor(s). Edition. # of Volumes. Place of Publication:

Publisher, copyright date. Print.


“Registered Nurse.” Encyclopedia of Nursing. New York: Random House, 1999. Print.


Encyclopedia Article with author (less common) [REMEMBER: NO GENERAL ENCYCLOPEDIAS!]

Last name, Firstname. “Title of Article or Entry.” Title of Encyclopedia. Editor(s). Edition. # of Volumes.

Place of Publication: Publisher, copyright date. Print.


Allen, Anita L. “Privacy in Health Care.” Encyclopedia of Bioethics. Ed. Warren T. Reich. Rev. Ed. 5 vols.

New York: Macmillan-Simon, 1995. Print.


Entry in Dictionary w/author (less common)

Lastname, Firstname. “Entry/Word.” # if citing a specific definition among several. Title of Dictionary. Editor(s).

Edition. # of Volumes. Place of Publication: Publisher, copyright date. Print.


Le Patourel, John. “Normans and Normandy.” Dictionary of the Middle Ages. Ed. Joseph R. Strayer. 13. vols. New

York: Scribner’s 1987. Print.


Entry in Dictionary without author (more common)

“Entry/Word.” # if citing a specific definition among several. Title of Dictionary. Editor(s). Edition. # of

Volumes. Place of Publication: Publisher, copyright date. Print.


“Noon.” Def. 4b. The Oxford English Dictionary. Eds. J. A. Simpson and W. S. Weiner. 2nd ed. 1989. 20 vols.

Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1989. Print.


A Government Publication

Cite the author of the publication if the author is identified. Otherwise start with the name of the government, followed by the agency and any subdivision that served as the corporate author. For congressional documents, be sure to include the number of the congress and the session when the hearing was held or resolution passed. (GPO is the abbr. for the Government Printing Office.)


United States. Cong. Joint Committee on the Investigation of the Pearl Harbor Attack. Hearings. 79th Cong., 1st and

2nd sess. 32 vols. Washington: GPO, 1946. Print.


Common Non-Print Sources Not on the Web

Video Recordings

An entry for a film usually begins with the title, italicized, and includes the director, the distributor, the year of release, and the medium. You may include other information that seems relevant or important—such as the names of the screenwriter, performers, and producer—between the title and distributor.

Informational/Documentary Films

Title of Film. Writ. Writer (if given). Dir. Director’s First Name Last Name (if given). Prod. Producer’s First Name

Last Name (if given). Prod. Production Company (if given). Distributor, copyright/release date. Medium (DVD, VHS or Videocassette, Laser disc, Slide show).


Alcohol and Its Medical Consequences: A Comprehensive Teaching Program for Biomedical Education. Prod. Dartmouth Medical

School. Milner-Fenwick, 1982. DVD.


Commercial Films for Entertainment

Title of Film. Dir. Perf. Prod. Original Release Date of Film (if given). Distributor, copyright/medium release date.

Medium.


Ed Wood. Dir. Tim Burton. Perf. Johnny Depp, Martin Landau, Sarah Jessica Parker, Patricia Arquette. 1994.

Touchstone, 2004. DVD.

Recorded Television Shows

Include information about original broadcast, plus medium of recording. When the title of the collection of recordings is different than the original series (e.g., the show Friends is in DVD release under the title Friends: The Complete Sixth Season), list the title that would be help researchers located the recording.


"The One Where Chandler Can't Cry." Friends: The Complete Sixth Season. Writ. Andrew Reich and Ted Cohen.

Dir. Kevin Bright. NBC. 10 Feb. 2000. Warner Brothers, 2004. DVD.

Personal, Telephone, or Email Interview Listed by the last name of the person you have interviewed.


Purdue, Pete. Personal Interview. 1 Dec. 2000.


Purdue, Pete. Telephone Interview. 1 Dec. 2000.


Purdue, Pete. Email Interview. 1 Dec. 2000.


Periodical Print Sources (Articles from Journals, Magazines, Newspapers)

MLA style is slightly different for popular periodicals, like newspapers, and scholarly journals, as you'll learn below.


An Article in a Newspaper or Most Magazines Note that there is no period after the title of the periodical.


Last Name, First Name of Author*. "Title of Article." Title of Periodical Day Month Year as available: Inclusive Page

Numbers. Print.


DATES: When writing the date, list day before month; use a three-letter abbreviation of the month (e.g., Jan., Mar., Aug.). If there is more than one edition available for that date (as in an early and late edition of a newspaper), identify the edition following the date (e.g., 17 May 1987, late ed.).


*MULTIPLE AUTHORS: If the entry contains multiple authors, refer rules/formula for multiple authors under books on page 3 of this handout.


Poniewozik, James. "TV Makes a Too-Close Call." Time 20 Nov. 2000: 70-71. Print.


Trembacki, Paul. "Brees Hopes to Win Heisman for Team." Purdue Exponent 5 Dec. 2000: 20. Print.


Jeromack, Paul. “This Once, a David of the Art World Does Goliath a Favor.” New York Times 13 July 2002, late

ed.: B7+. [NEWSPAPER: Note that newspapers include letters in their page numbers because

newspapers are divided into sections. Note also that the + indicates that the article goes

beyond page B7.]


NO AUTHOR: If the author is not give, begin with the title of the article:


"Brees Hopes to Win Heisman for Team." Purdue Exponent 5 Dec. 2000: 20.


An Article in a Scholarly Journal or Magazines with Volume and Issue Numbers

Basic format: Note that there is no period after the title of the periodical.


Last Name, First Name of Author*. "Title of Article." Title of Periodical Volume #.Issue # (Publication Date):

Inclusive Page Numbers. Print.


Hernández-Reguant, Ariana. “Copyrighting Che: Art and Authorship under Cuban Late Socialism.” Public Culture

16.1 (2004): 1-29. Print.


Periodical Publications in Online Databases [NC Wiseowl: Gale’s InfoTrac & EBSCOHost]

If you're citing an article or a publication that was originally issued in print form but that you retrieved from an online database that your library subscribes to, you should provide enough information so that the reader can locate the article either in its original print form or retrieve it from the online database (if they have access). Note: If there are no page numbers, in place of the page numbers, write n. pag.


Periodicals (Scholarly Journals & Some Magazines) with VOLUME & ISSUE NUMBERS

DATES: When writing the date, list day before month; use a three-letter abbreviation of the month (e.g., Jan., Mar., Aug.). If there is more than one edition available for that date (as in an early and late edition of a newspaper), identify the edition following the date (e.g., 17 May 1987, late ed.).


Periodicals With Volume and Issue Numbers (Scholarly Journals and Some Magazines) & AUTHOR

Last Name, First Name of Author. "Title of Article." Periodical Name Volume Number.Issue Number (Publication

Date): Inclusive Page #s. Database name. Web. Date of Access.


Tolston, Nancy. “Making Books Available: The Role of Early Libraries, Librarians, and Booksellers in the

Promotion of African American Children’s Literature.” African American Review 32.1 (1998): 9-16. JSTOR.

Web. 5 June 2008.


Note: The 32 in 32.1 is the volume number; the 1 in the 32.1 is the issue number.


Periodicals With Volume and Issue Numbers (Scholarly Journals and Some Magazines) & AUTHOR BUT NO PAGE NUMBERS


Last Name, First Name of Author. "Title of Article." Periodical Name Volume Number.Issue Number (Publication

Date): n. pag. Database name. Web. Date of Access.


Tolston, Nancy. “Making Books Available: The Role of Early Libraries, Librarians, and Booksellers in the

Promotion of African American Children’s Literature.” African American Review 32.1 (1998): n. pag. JSTOR.

Web. 5 June 2008.


Periodicals With Volume and Issue Numbers (Scholarly Journals and Some Magazines) & NO AUTHOR

"Title of Article." Periodical Name Volume Number.Issue Number (Publication Date): Inclusive Page #s. Database

name. Web. Date of Access.


“Making Books Available: The Role of Early Libraries, Librarians, and Booksellers in the Promotion of African

American Children’s Literature.” African American Review 32.1 (1998): 9-16. JSTOR. Web. 5 June 2008.


Periodicals With Volume and Issue Numbers (Scholarly Journals and Some Magazines) & TWO AUTHORS

Last Name, First Name of 1st Author, First Name Last Name of 2nd Author. "Title of Article." Periodical Name

Volume Number.Issue Number (Publication Date): Inclusive Page #s. Database name. Web. Date of Access.


Tolston, Nancy, and James Cook. “Making Books Available: The Role of Early Libraries, Librarians, and

Booksellers in the Promotion of African American Children’s Literature.” African American Review 32.1 (1998): 9-16. JSTOR. Web. 5 June 2008.


Periodicals W/ Volume & Issue Numbers (Scholarly Journals & Some Magazines) & MORE THAN 2 AUTHORS

Last Name, First Name of 1st Author, et al. "Title of Article." Periodical Name Volume Number.Issue Number

(Publication Date): Inclusive Page #s. Database name. Web. Date of Access.


Tolston, Nancy, et al. “Making Books Available: The Role of Early Libraries, Librarians, and Booksellers in the

Promotion of African American Children’s Literature.” African American Review 32.1 (1998): 9-16. JSTOR. Web. 5 June 2008.


Periodicals (Magazines, Newspapers) Without Volume and Issue Number

REMEMBER: If there are no page numbers, in place of the page numbers, write n. pag.


DATES: When writing the date, list day before month; use a three-letter abbreviation of the month (e.g., Jan., Mar., Aug.). If there is more than one edition available for that date (as in an early and late edition of a newspaper), identify the edition following the date (e.g., 17 May 1987, late ed.).


Periodicals Without Volume and Issue Number BUT WITH AUTHOR


Last Name, First Name of Author. "Title of Article." Periodical Name Day Month Year of Publication: Inclusive Page

#s. Database name. Web. Date of Access.


Hannaford, Peter. “Flat-tax Primer: It Just Makes Good Sense.” Newsweek 20 Sept. 2005: 17. Student Edition. Web.

21 Sept. 2006.


Periodicals Without Volume and Issue Number BUT NO AUTHOR

“Flat-tax Primer: It Just Makes Good Sense.” Newsweek 20 Sept. 2005: 17. Student Edition. Web. 21 Sept. 2006.


Periodical Articles with No Page Numbers:

Hannaford, Peter. “Flat-tax Primer: It Just Makes Good Sense.” Newsweek 20 Sept. 2005: n.pag. Student Edition. Web.

21 Sept. 2006.


Editorial:

Rosenberg, Mark. “Something Old, Something New. . . . “ Editorial. Canadian Journal on Aging 26.2 (2007): 81.

Project Muse. Web. 30 Nov. 2007.


Newspaper

Hannaford, Peter. “Flat-tax Primer: It Just Makes Good Sense.” The Washington Post 20 Sept. 2005: B7+.

Student Edition. Web. 21 Sept. 2006. [NEWSPAPER: Note that newspapers include letters in their page numbers because newspapers are divided into sections. Note also that the + indicates that the article goes

beyond page B7.]


Other Web Publications

Web sites (in MLA style, the "W" in Web is capitalized, and "Web site" or "Web sites" are written as two words) and Web pages are arguably the most commonly cited form of electronic resource today. Below are a variety of Web sites and pages you might need to cite. Most works on the Web are nonperiodical—not released on a regular schedule. Websites sponsored by newspapers and magazines are generally nonperiodical and are documented as shown below. You do not need to include the URL unless instructed to do so by your teacher.


Nonperiodical Web Publication

Last Name, First Name of author, compiler, director, editor, narrator, performer, or translator of work. Title of

Work [if work is independent]. Title of overall Website [if different from Title of Work]. Version or edition

used. Publisher or sponsor of the site [if not available, use N.p.], Date of publication [day month year, as

available; if nothing is available, use n.d.]. Medium of Publication [Web]. Date of Access [day month year].


Garcia, Linda, Jose Angel, comp. A Bibliography of Literary Theory, Criticism and Philology. 13th ed. U de Zaragoza, 2008.

Web. 15 May 2008.


Last Name, First Name of author, compiler, director, editor, narrator, performer, or translator of work. “Title of

Work [if work is part of a larger work].” Title of overall Website. Version or Edition used. Publisher or sponsor of the site [if not available, use N.p.], Date of publication [day month year, as available; if nothing is available, use n.d.]. Medium of Publication [Web]. Date of Access [day month year].


Tyre, Peg. “Standardized Tests in College?” Newsweek. Newsweek, 16 Nov. 2007. Web. 15 May 2008.


Quade, Alex. “Elite Team Rescues Troops behind Enemy Lines.” CNN.com. Cable News Network, 19 Mar. 2007.

Web. 15 May 2008.


Green, Joshua. “The Rove Presidency.” The Atlantic.com. Atlantic Monthly Group, Sept. 2007. Web. 15 May 2008.


“Six Charged in Alleged N.J Terror Plot.” WNBC.com. WNBC, 8 May 2007. Web. 15 May 2008.


A Work on the Web Cited with Print Publication Data

If the nonperiodical work you are citing also appeared in print, you may determine that is important to include the bibliographic data for the print publication as part of your entry. A book that was scanned for access in a database, for example, is usually cited in this way.

Whittier, John G. “A Prayer.” The Freedman’s Book. Ed. L. Maria Child. Boston, 1866. 178. Google Book

Search. Web. 15 May 2008.


A Scholarly Journal on the Web

Some scholarly journals exist only in electronic form on the Web while others appear both in print and on the Web.


Landauer, Michelle. “Images of Virtue: Reading, Reformation and the Visualization of Culture in Rousseau’s

La nouvelle Heloise.” Romanticism on the Net 46 (2007): n. pag. Web 8 Nov. 2007.


Shah, Parilah Mohd, and Fauziah Ahmad. “A Comparative Account of Bilingual Education Programs in Malaysia

and the United States.” GEMA Online Journal of Language Studies 7.2 (2007): 63-77. Web. 5 June 2008.


Special Book Situations (Citing Translated Books, Multivolume Works, Introductions)


A Translated Book

Cite as you would any other book, and add "Trans." followed by the translator's/translators' name(s):


Foucault, Michel. Madness and Civilization: A History of Insanity in the Age of Reason. Trans. Richard Howard.

New York: Vintage-Random House, 1988. Print.


A Multivolume Work

When citing only one volume of a multivolume work, include the volume number after the work's title, or after the work's editor or translator.


Quintilian. Institutio Oratoria. Trans. H. E. Butler. Vol. 2. Cambridge: Loeb-Harvard UP, 1980. Print.


When citing more than one volume of a multivolume work, cite the total number of volumes in the work.


Quintilian. Institutio Oratoria. Trans. H. E. Butler. 4 vols. Cambridge: Loeb-Harvard UP, 1980. Print.


When citing multivolume works in your text, always include the volume number followed by a colon, then the page number(s): … as Quintilian wrote in Institutio Oratoria (1:14-17). Print.


An Introduction, a Preface, a Forward, or an Afterword


When citing an introduction, a preface, a forward, or an afterword, write the name of the authors and then give the name of the part being cited, which should not be italicized, underlined or enclosed in quotation marks.


Farrell, Thomas B. Introduction. Norms of Rhetorical Culture. By Farrell. New Haven: Yale UP, 1993. 1-13. Print.


If the writer of the piece is different from the author of the complete work, then write the full name of after the word "By." For example:


Duncan, Hugh Dalziel. Introduction. Permanence and Change: An Anatomy of Purpose. By Kenneth Burke. 1935.

3rd ed. Berkeley: U of California P, 1984. xiii-xliv. Print.


Other Non-Print Sources


A Television or Radio Broadcast


“Title of the Episode or Segment.” Title of the Program or Series. Name of the Network (if any). Call Letters,

city of the local station (if any), Broadcast date. Medium of reception (e.g., Radio, Television).


“Death and Society.” Narr. Joanne Silberner. Weekend Edition Sunday. National Public Radio. WUWM,

Milwaulkee, 25 Jan. 1998. Radio.


“The Phantom of Corleone.” Narr. Steve Kroft. Sixty Minutes. CBS. WCBS, New York, 10 Dec. 2006. Television.


A Radio Broadcast on the Web: Note the omission of the original Medium and its information.


“Death and Society.” Narr. Joanne Silberner. Weekend Edition Sunday. National Public Radio. 25 Jan. 1998. Web. 15

May 2008.


A Transcript of a Program


Fresh Air. Narr. Terry Gross. National Public Radio. WHYY, n. p. 20 May 2008. Print. Transcript.


Fresh Air. Narr. Terry Gross. National Public Radio. 20 May 2008. Web. 19 June 2009. Transcript.


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