[1] "Proceedings of the 1996 ieee 11th annual power electronics conference and exposition, apec'96. Part 2 (of 2)," in




Скачать 195.69 Kb.
Название[1] "Proceedings of the 1996 ieee 11th annual power electronics conference and exposition, apec'96. Part 2 (of 2)," in
страница2/8
Дата конвертации28.10.2012
Размер195.69 Kb.
ТипДокументы
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8
Proceedings of IEEE Applied Power Electronics Conference and Exposition, 1996, pp. 454.


In many power electronic applications ferrite cores of magnetic components are biased with a DC or low-frequency premagnetization. Usually however, the influence of the bias on the losses and permeability is not considered in the component design. This paper describes a precise measurement setup to determine the power losses and the magnetization curve of premagnetized ferrites. The measurements on typical ferrites of two major manufacturers prove that the influence of a DC-bias on the material properties can not be neglected. The utilization of a ferrite is if a DC-bias is applied to the component.

[21] D. Busse, J. Erdman, R. J. Kerkman, D. Schlegel, and G. Skibinski, "System electrical parameters and their effects on bearing currents," in Proceedings of IEEE Applied Power Electronics Conference and Exposition, 1996, pp. 570.


This paper examines ac motor shaft voltages and resulting bearing currents when operated under Pulse Width Modulation (PWM) voltage source inverters. The paper reviews the electrical characteristics of bearings and motors that cause shaft voltages and bearing currents. A brief review of previous work is presented, including a system model for electrical analysis of bearing currents. Relying on the work of a companion paper, the propensity for Electric Discharge Machining (EDM) is determined by a design equation that is a function of system components. Pertinent machine parameters and their formulas are presented and values calculated for machines from 5 to 1000 Hp. The effects of system elements on shaft voltages and bearing currents are evaluated experimentally and the results compared to theory. Finally, the paper will present quantitative results for one solution to the shaft voltage and bearing current problem.

[22] D. Busse, J. Erdman, R. J. Kerkman, D. Schlegel, and G. Skibinski, "Effects of pwm voltage source inverters on the mechanical performance of rolling bearings," in Proceedings of IEEE Applied Power Electronics Conference and Exposition, 1996, pp. 561.


Modern power inverters provide the industrial control industry with significant advantages. The faster switching devices have increased drive performance, but with some recently discovered disadvantages. One disadvantage, rotor shaft voltage and resulting bearing current has become an industry concern. The oil film in a bearing acts as a capacitor and provides a charging mechanism for rotor shaft voltage buildup. Electrical breakdown of the film can damage the bearing. The paper examines the mechanical and electrical characteristics of the bearing and converts them into models. The mechanical model for the bearing contact area establishes an allowable bearing current density, which is used to estimate the effect of electrical life of a mechanical bearing. The electrical model for the bearing provides a significant advancement to aid bearing design and in the analysis of electrically induced bearing damage. Finally, the paper presents quantitative results on one solution to the shaft voltage and bearing current problem.

[23] C. A. Canesin and I. Barbi, "Analysis and design of constant-frequency peak-current-controlled high-power-factor boost rectifier with slope compensation," in Proceedings of IEEE Applied Power Electronics Conference and Exposition, 1996, pp. 807.


This paper presents the analysis and the design of a peak-current-controlled high-power-factor boost rectifier, with slope compensation, operating at constant frequency. The input current shaping is achieved, with continuous inductor current mode, with no multiplier to generate a current reference. The resulting overall circuitry is very simple, in comparison with the average-current-controlled boost rectifier. Experimental results are presented, taken from a laboratory prototype rated at 370 W and operating at 67 kHz. The measured power factor was 0.99, with a input current THD equal to 5.6%, for an input voltage THD equal to 2.26%.

[24] F. Caricchi, F. Crescimbini, and A. Di Napoli, "Prototype of innovative wheel direct drive with water-cooled axial-flux pm motor for electric vehicle applications," in Proceedings of IEEE Applied Power Electronics Conference and Exposition, 1996, pp. 764.


This paper presents an innovative wheel direct drive which uses a novel topology of axial-flux permanent magnet machine having multi-stage structure and water-cooled air-wound stator winding. Battery supply of the motor is accomplished by means of a water-cooled IGBT power electronic interface which is the cascade of a bidirectional dc-to-dc buck-boost converter and current regulated PWM inverter. The paper discusses design and construction of a 25 kW prototype of the proposed wheel direct drive, which will find application in the propulsion system of a novel city car.

[25] C. C. Chan, J. Z. Jiang, W. Xia, K. T. Chau, and M. L. Zhu, "Optimal-efficiency control for constant-power operation of phase-decoupling permanent-magnet brushless motor drives," in Proceedings of IEEE Applied Power Electronics Conference and Exposition, 1996, pp. 751.


In this paper, a control approach to optimize the system efficiency of phase-decoupling (PD) permanent-magnet (PM) brushless motor drives during constant-power operation is presented. The approach is to adaptively adjust the advanced conduction angle to minimize the total system losses for a given operation point in the constant-power region. The corresponding minimum total losses are determined by minimizing the input current for a fixed voltage source. Both computer simulation and experimental results are given for illustration.

[26] J. Chen, "Minimizing input filter physical size subject to electrical performance constraints," in Proceedings of IEEE Applied Power Electronics Conference and Exposition, 1996, pp. 347.


This paper describes an automated technique, based on a circuit optimizer, for minimizing the physical dimensions of a switch mode power supply input filter. The technique is shown on a 2- section input filter. Results are assessed statistically and graphically.

[27] W. Chen, F. C. Lee, and T. Yamauchi, "Improved `charge pump' electronic ballast with low thd and low crest factor," in Proceedings of IEEE Applied Power Electronics Conference and Exposition, 1996, pp. 622.


The `charge pump' electronic ballast circuit, which employs a charging capacitor and a high frequency ac source to implement the power factor correction (PFC), has become an attractive topology for ballasting the fluorescent lamps because it eliminates the use of a bulky boost inductor. But this circuit has the problems of high total harmonic distortion (THD) of the input current, and high crest factor (CF) of the lamp current. This paper analyzes the origin of the problems and proposes a novel solution. With the addition of two small clamping diodes, very good input current (PFgt;0.99, THD <5%) and lamp current (CF<1.6) can be obtained with the open loop control. The experimental results are provided for verification.

[28] J.-h. Cheng and A. F. Witulski, "Simple design of selected 3-element converters by scaling the solution of the lc parallel resonant converter," in Proceedings of IEEE Applied Power Electronics Conference and Exposition, 1996, pp. 284.


An efficient and practical method for steady-state design of selected 3-element parallel resonant dc/dc converters is presented. To a good approximation, the output voltage and current of an LLC converter can be obtained by multiplying the output voltage or current of the parallel LC converter by a ratio of the parallel and series inductances. The LLC converters with and without an output filter inductor are examined for various conduction modes. The peak voltage and current stresses on the resonant elements also depend on the same ratio. An experimental LLC-type parallel resonant converter is built to further ensure the validity of derived equations and the feasibility of removing the filtering inductor.

[29] P.-T. Cheng, S. Bhattacharya, and D. M. Divan, "Hybrid solutions for improving passive filter performance in high power applications," in Proceedings of IEEE Applied Power Electronics Conference and Exposition, 1996, pp. 911.


This paper presents a new control scheme for parallel hybrid active filter system intended for harmonic compensation of large non-linear loads up to 20 MVA to meet IEEE 519 recommended harmonic standards. The control scheme is based on the concept of synthesizing a dynamically variable inductance and is used for an active filtering application. A synchronous reference frame based controller implements the dynamically varying, negative or positive inductance, by generating active filter inverter voltage commands. This controller based parallel hybrid active filter system can selectively synthesize multiple active inductances at dominant harmonic frequencies without affecting passive filter impedances at all other frequencies. The controller can be used to provide `current limiting' function to prevent passive filter overloading under ambient harmonic loads and/or supply voltage distortions. Three implementation variations of parallel hybrid active filter system are presented. This paper also proposes the use of power factor correction capacitors as passive filters for parallel hybrid active filter system, controlled to provide multiple tuned harmonic sinks and to increase cost-effectiveness for high power applications. Simulation results with both PWM and square-wave inverters validate the controller operation for mis-tuned passive filters, single and multiple frequency tuning, to achieve harmonic compensation of a 325 kVA harmonic load under supply voltage harmonics and ambient harmonic loads.

[30] J.-G. Cho, J.-w. Baek, G.-H. Rim, and I. Kang, "Novel zero voltage transition pwm multi-phase converters," in Proceedings of IEEE Applied Power Electronics Conference and Exposition, 1996, pp. 500.


A new zero voltage transition (ZVT) PWM multi-phase converters are presented. To construct a ZVT multi-phase converter in a conventional way, it is necessary to add the auxiliary circuits as many as the number of phases. In the proposed converter, only one auxiliary circuit provides the zero voltage switching (ZVS) for main switches and diodes of all phases. So, the new converters are cost effective and attractive for high performance and high power density conversion applications. Operation, features and characteristics of two phase buck converter are illustrated and verified on a 4 kW, 100 kHz IGBT based (MOSFET for the auxiliary switch) experimental circuit.

[31] J.-W. Choi, D.-W. Chung, and S.-K. Sul, "Implementation of field oriented induction machine considering iron losses," in Proceedings of IEEE Applied Power Electronics Conference and Exposition, 1996, pp. 375.


Iron loss is a possible source of performance deterioration, especially for a torque regulation, in field oriented induction machine. In this paper, study on the model of an induction machine with iron losses, a flux estimation strategy, the design of direct and indirect field oriented controller, a precise torque regulation scheme and the determination of a core loss resistance are discussed. Simulation and experimental results are also included and show the effectiveness of the proposed analysis and the proposed control strategy.

[32] S. Choi, P. N. Enjeti, and D. A. Paice, "New 24-pulse diode rectifier systems for utility interface of high power ac motor drives," in Proceedings of IEEE Applied Power Electronics Conference and Exposition, 1996, pp. 925.


This paper proposes two new passive 24-pulse diode rectifier systems for utility interface of PWM ac motor drives. The first approach employs an extended delta transformer arrangement which results in near equal leakage inductance in series with each diode rectifier bridge. This promotes equal current sharing and improved performance. A specially tapped interphase reactor is then introduced with two additional diodes to extend the conventional 12-pulse operation to 24-pulse operation from the input current point of view. The proposed system exhibits clean power characteristics with 5th, 7th, 11th, 13th, 17th and 19th harmonics eliminated from the utility line currents. The second scheme is a reduced kVA approach employing autotransformers to obtain 24-pulse operation. The kVA rating of the polyphase transformer in the second scheme is 0.18 Po (PU). Detailed analysis and simulations verify the proposed concept and experimental results from a 208 V, 10 kVA rectifier system are provided.

[33] T.-W. Chun and M.-K. Choi, "Development of adaptive hysteresis band current control strategy of pwm inverter with constant switching frequency," in Proceedings of IEEE Applied Power Electronics Conference and Exposition, 1996, pp. 194.


Hysteresis current control is one of the simplest techniques used to control the magnitude and phase angle of motor current for motor drive systems. However the conventional fixed band hysteresis control has a variable switching frequency depending on motor speed and load. In this paper, the adaptive hysteresis band current control strategy is proposed, where the hysteresis band is controlled as variations of motor speed, load current, and neutral point voltage in order to hold the switching frequency constant at any operating conditions. The proposed current control strategy is introduced to the current controller of a vector controlled permanent-magnet synchronous motor systems. The proposed strategy is verified by simulations and experiments.

[34] D. L. Cooper, "Standardization of specifications for distributed power converter modules," in Proceedings of IEEE Applied Power Electronics Conference and Exposition, 1996, pp. 997.


Each manufacturer of DC-to-DC power converter modules typically has a different approach to specifying performance data, making it very difficult for a user to make a proper selection for his/her application, or to make educated comparisons between the various offerings. This paper presents arguments in favor of a standardized approach to specification of DC-to-DC power converter modules, particularly those used in distributed power system applications.

[35] N. Dai and F. C. Lee, "Design of a high density low-profile transformer," in Proceedings of IEEE Applied Power Electronics Conference and Exposition, 1996, pp. 434.


An algorithm is developed to design a transformer that has the highest power density and meets a given set of specifications. The maximum achievable power density for a given power level and output voltage is computed base on only one fundamental constraint, i.e. the efficiency or temperature rise requirement. A family of curves that present the relationship between the power density and transformer height are developed. It is found that there is an optimum height at which the power density peaks. The maximum achievable power density is determined along with the optimum operating frequency and core geometry. As a result, a transformer with a height of 6 mm and a power density of 600 W/in3 was built for a 100 W, 3.3-V output active-clamped forward converter using self-drive synchronous rectifiers.

[36] J. M. Damaschke, "Design of a low input voltage converter for thermoelectric generator," in Proceedings of IEEE Applied Power Electronics Conference and Exposition, 1996, pp. 856.


Low-grade exhaust heat is used to provide a reliable and independent power source for instrumentation circuitry by means of a thermoelectric generator (TEG). A design of a self-starting dc-dc converter is developed and optimized for very low input voltages (below 300 mV) in order to allow operation at temperature differences of 20 °C and less. A prototype is built, and the results are experimentally verified.

[37] F. Daniel, R. Chaffai, and K. Al Haddad, "Three-phase diode rectifier with low harmonic distortion to feed capacitive loads," in
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8

Похожие:

[1] \"Proceedings of the 1996 ieee 11th annual power electronics conference and exposition, apec\[1] Anon, "Apec: Ieee applied power electronics conference and exposition conference proceedings 1986," in

[1] \"Proceedings of the 1996 ieee 11th annual power electronics conference and exposition, apec\[1] "Proceedings of the 1996 ieee 27th annual power electronics specialists conference, pesc. Part 2 (of 2)," in

[1] \"Proceedings of the 1996 ieee 11th annual power electronics conference and exposition, apec\[1] "Proceedings of the 1998 13th annual applied power electronics and exposition, apec'98. Part 2 (of 2)," in

[1] \"Proceedings of the 1996 ieee 11th annual power electronics conference and exposition, apec\Annual ieee applied power electronics conference and exposition apec 2004: Volume 3, in

[1] \"Proceedings of the 1996 ieee 11th annual power electronics conference and exposition, apec\[1] "Proceedings of the 1994 25th annual ieee power electronics specialists conference. Part 2 (of 2)," in

[1] \"Proceedings of the 1996 ieee 11th annual power electronics conference and exposition, apec\[1] "Proceedings of the 1997 28th annual ieee power electronics specialists conference, pesc. Part 1 (of 2)," in

[1] \"Proceedings of the 1996 ieee 11th annual power electronics conference and exposition, apec\[1] "Proceedings: 2002 ieee 33rd annual ieee power electronics specialists conference," in

[1] \"Proceedings of the 1996 ieee 11th annual power electronics conference and exposition, apec\[1] "Eighteenth annual ieee applied power electronics conference and exposition volume 1," in

[1] \"Proceedings of the 1996 ieee 11th annual power electronics conference and exposition, apec\[1] "Conference proceedings: 2004 ieee 35th annual power electronics specialists conference, pesc04 volume 5," in

[1] \"Proceedings of the 1996 ieee 11th annual power electronics conference and exposition, apec\[1] "Proceedings of the 1995 ieee 10th annual applied power electronics conference. Vol 1 (of 2)," in


Разместите кнопку на своём сайте:
lib.convdocs.org


База данных защищена авторским правом ©lib.convdocs.org 2012
обратиться к администрации
lib.convdocs.org
Главная страница