Draft Environmental Impact Statement




НазваниеDraft Environmental Impact Statement
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Дата конвертации29.10.2012
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Major adverse effect to hydroelectric projects. Mitigation through HABS/HAER inventory, documentation, and leaving some structures in place at Glines reduces impacts to minor. Permanent, major beneficial impacts to cultural resources important to the tribe by making previously inundated resources accessible. Minor to negligible impacts, with mitigation, to cultural resources and cultural landscapes in the immediate vicinity of damsites.

Same as proposed action except that trenching of pipeline could affect some cultural resources; with mitigation, impacts would be minor.

Offsite disposal of dam rubble

No effects to cultural resources.

Minor impacts, with mitigation.

Same as proposed action.

Increased flooding and erosion

No effects to cultural resources.

Minor impacts, with mitigation, to sites potentially affected by increased flooding and erosion.

Same as proposed action.

Construction of access roads and staging areas

No effects to cultural resources.

Moderate, short-term impacts to Elwha Ranger Station Historic District, Altaire and Elwha campgrounds kitchen shelters, known and potential landscapes, culturally sensitive areas, known and unknown archeological sites if roads built near or these areas are used for access/staging of equipment. With mitigation, impact minor.

Same as proposed action.

SOCIOECONOMICS










County economic base

Ten employees would continue to be required for the operation of the hydroelectric projects.


Travel and tourism creates about 2,000 jobs and $21.3 million now. Tax receipts from tourism/travel estimated at $1.4 million.

Major long-term beneficial impacts would occur to the county’s economic base. Over the 10-year pre-construction, construction and restoration period, an additional 1150-1240 jobs, $60-65 million in business activity, and $32-34 million in personal income would be generated in Clallam County. After restoration completed, 446 annual jobs, $4.6 million in annual payroll in the recreation/tourism sector, and an annual increase in local sales taxes of $296,000 would be generated.


County property tax on projects eliminated ($230,000 per year). Local share of state sales tax would increase by $296,900 per year after project completion.

Higher capital costs of pipeline would incrementally increase net cost of project, but not significantly. Major long-term beneficial impacts to the county’s economic base would still occur under this alternative.

Infrastructure, services and utilities

Clallam County 1993 operating budget ($14.8 million); $4.3 million in property taxes collected, of this, $230,000 was from hydroelectric projects. A total of $2.1 million generated from sales tax payments to county general fund in 1993.


Annual maintenance costs of $100,000 for Ediz Hook would continue.


Housing stock adequate to meet future demand.

County would not collect $230,000 in annual property taxes from the projects.


Annual maintenance costs for Ediz Hook reduced by $28,000 per year.


Housing and public infrastructure would be adequate to meet construction worker and river-restoration related population demand.

Same as proposed action.

Estimated project cost

Not applicable

$111.1 million

$127.4 million

Impacts to Daishowa America Mill and electric power consumer

Estimated 1996 cost of power production from the dams, without any improvement expenses is 12.29 mills; real priority firm for purchased power is 26.7 mills; real rate expected to decline to 23 mills by 2001.


Estimated annual real energy cost for replacement power in 2010 is $2.1 million.


Dams would require $8.7 million in repair costs; annual operational costs of the dams would continue at $2.1 million.

Daishowa’s power acquisition costs would start at 26.7 mills, and would decline to 23 mills by 2001.


Estimated annual real energy cost for replacement power in 2010 is $4.0 million.


Negligible impacts to overall electric rates.


Dam repair costs of $8.7 million not necessary. Power cost to the mill increases to $4 million annually. $440,000 in payments to local energy utility not collected.



Same as proposed action.

Fisheries and fish processing

Continued major adverse impact-total annual net business benefits from Elwha fishery currently estimated at $840,000.

Major beneficial impact-total annual net business benefits from Elwha fishery would reach $3.5 million.

Same as proposed action.

Recreation and tourism

Travel/tourism expenditures (1993) in Clallam Co. $116.9 million. Related payroll income $18.8 million.

An increase of 734,000 annual visitor nights in Clallam County is expected with river restoration, generating business expenditures of $28.5 million annually. Related payroll income increased by $4.6 million annually.

Same as proposed action.

Social values

Dams considered an important source of local pride to some residents


County and region would continue to experience economic trends from resource based to tourism based economy. No sharp changes in social structure anticipated.

Minor impact to social structure

Same as proposed action.

Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe

Major long-term adverse impact to level of tribe’s poverty, employment, income, health, and social structure.

Major beneficial impact to level of tribe’s poverty, employment, income health, and social structure.

Same as proposed action.

Nonmarket values

No change or impacts expected.

Major beneficial impacts; restoration expected to generate $3.5 billion annually for 10 years.

Same as proposed action.

Net economic value of project

Daishowa America pays $2.1 million/yr. For 172 gigawatt hours. Major impact to commercial recreational fishery sectors continues. Overall, recreation and tourism continue slow growth trend.

Major beneficial impact; benefits from increase recreation and tourism would reach $133 million over 100 years of project life. The $3.5 million per year of net economic benefits after fish stocks were restored would reach $35 million over project life.

Same as proposed action.

PUBLIC HEALTH AND SAFETY










Earthquakes

Glines Canyon Dam considered safe for currently identified maximum credible earthquake, and probable maximum flood; safety of Elwha Dam is unknown. If MCE is modified, may need to reanalyze and modify structures.

Dam removal would remove danger from flooding caused by maximum credible earthquake; would eliminate need to correct structural deficiencies in the future.

Same as proposed action.

Dam safety

Both dams considered safe during currently identified probable maximum flood and maximum credible earthquakes (MCE).

Safety precautions built into dam removal designs, no safety risks anticipated during deconstruction; dam removal would eliminate potential of dam failure.

Same as proposed action.

Hazardous materials

Asbestos, lead based paint and PCBs would continue to pose a threat of further contamination. Hydrocarbons would require clean-up.

Remediation or removal of materials (petroleum contaminated soils, underground storage tanks, asbestos, and various chemical stores) prior to dam removal would reduce the threat of further contamination.

Same as proposed action.

TRANSPORTATION










Levels of service for peak weekday hours during year 2000 at 13 intersections between damsites and disposal area

Levels of service are very good (LOS A) for most intersections. They are acceptable (LOS B) at the intersection of Old Olympic Highway and Sequim-Dungeness Road and (LOS C) at the intersection of US 101 and Highway 112, and poor (i.e. long delays and poor traffic flow-LOS F or LOS*) for the intersection of Marine Drive and Highway 117.

No changes to levels of service would be expected from the addition of project-related traffic.

Same as proposed action.

Levels of service for peak weekend hours during year 2000 at 13 intersections between damsites and disposal area

Same as weekday except traffic flow is very good (LOS A) at the intersection of US 101 and Highway 112, and acceptable (LOS C) at Marine Drive and Highway 117.

No changes to levels of service would be expected from the addition of project related traffic.

Same as proposed action.

Levels of service for peak weekday hours during year 2005 at 13 intersections between damsites and disposal area

Same as for year 2000 weekday, except the intersection of US 101 and Highway 112 is now poor (LOS F), and LOS at US 101 and Old Olympic Highway has declined from A to B.

No changes to levels of service would be expected from the addition of project-related traffic.

Same as proposed action.

Levels of service for peak weekend hours during year 2005 at 13 intersections between damsites and disposal area

All intersections except those listed below are operating well (LOS A). Marine Drive and Highway 117 is at LOS C, US 101 and Highway 112 is at B; US 101 and Old Olympic Highway is at D (still considered acceptable); and Old Olympic Highway and Sequim-Dungeness Road is at LOS B.

No changes to levels of service would be expected from the addition of project-related traffic except LOS at US 101 and Highway 112 would decline from B to C.

Same as proposed action.

INDIAN TRUST RESOURCES










Federal trust responsibility to protect treaty fishing rights (up to one-half harvestable fish)

Dams have blocked access to, inundated and degraded fish habitat with major adverse impact to harvestable fish; access to usual and accustomed fishing places is blocked.

Permanent restoration of anadromous fisheries and access to usual and accustomed fishing places. Major, beneficial, long-term impact.

Same as proposed action except that fish restoration and access to usual and accustomed fishing places may occur sooner.

Federal trust responsibility to protect shellfish harvesting rights (to take up to one-half of non staked or cultivated bed shellfish)

Degraded shellfish habitat in estuary and nearshore marine areas, near elimination of sandy substrate has caused decline in hardshell clam populations; impact unquantified, but considered major, adverse.

Restoring sediment transport would reestablish sandy substrate, larger and more complex estuary for shellfish. Major, beneficial, long-term impact.

Same as proposed action.

Federal trust responsibility to protect right to hunt on open and unclaimed lands

Inundated wildlife habitat, and loss of salmon as prey has had a major, unquantified adverse impact on wildlife.

Restoration of 562 acres of land now inundated to natural vegetation, and of salmon throughout river would have major, long-term, beneficial impact to wildlife.

Same as proposed action.

Protection of primary purposes of Lower Elwha Klallam Reservation

Risk of flooding from Elwha Dam failure unknown but unacceptable to tribe. Impact should failure occur major and adverse. Near elimination of sediment beyond dams has contributed to erosion of tribal beaches. Impact unquantified, but considered major and adverse.

Dam removal would eliminate risk of flooding; restoring sediment transport would rebuild beach. Both major, permanent beneficial impacts.

Same as proposed action.

RECREATION










Recreation facilities, including reservoirs

No change, lake oriented – incongruous with pristine nature of Elwha River watershed.

Permanent loss of flatwater boating and fishing opportunities – other lakes available in area, so impacts considered moderate; significant permanent increase in sport and marine fishing for anadromous salmon and trout; river oriented with an increase of 5.3 miles of river.
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