China efl: Mute English. Cet – the Bane of efl acquisition in China




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НазваниеChina efl: Mute English. Cet – the Bane of efl acquisition in China
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China EFL: Programming Human Robots Wolff, Martin Feb 2009 Major Article China: Grade Inflation in Higher Education Wolff, Martin Dec 2008 Book Preview CHINA EFL: Foreign Teacher Needed Wolff, Martin Oct 2008 Book Preview


China EFL: Mute English. CET – the Bane of EFL Acquisition in China


Niu Qiang, PhD, and Martin Wolff, J.D. China


Niu Qiang, Ph.D. was born and raised in Shenyang, Lioning Province, PRC. She obtained her Bachelor of Arts degree (1991) in English from Jilin University; her Master of Arts degree (1996) in English Linguistics from Jilin University; and her PhD (1999) in English Linguistics from Shanghai International Studies University. She is currently an Associate Professor at the School of Foreign Languages, Changchun University, Jilin, China, where she teaches Psycholinguistics, Second Language Acquisition (SLA), Testing of English as a Second Language.

Martin Wolff, J.D. is currently a "Foreign Expert" in China teaching International Business Law, Marketing, International Negotiations, Introduction to the WTO, and Holistic English as a Foreign Language. He graduated from Loyola University, Los Angeles, with a Juris Doctor degree He was appointed a "Foreign Expert" in China in 2002 and has taught at many prestigious universities throughout China. He is the co-author, of the Holistic English Workbook series that includes: Holistic Business English; Holistic Freshman English; Holistic Marketing English; Holistic Tourism English; and eleven other specialized Holistic workbooks. E-mail: teachbesl@yahoo.co.uk

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Abstract

Introduction

Definition

Real causes of Mute English

CET

Teachers

Teaching materials

No English speaking environment

Effects of Mute English

Solution

Conclusion

References


Abstract


“Mute English” (ME) is a unique Chinese phenomena ignored by linguistic scholars but derided by Chinese students. It is a communicative language taught as if it were a dead language, like Latin. We explore the origins, as well as the cause and effect of this phenomenon.


Introduction


Mute English is a term brought to the authors’ attention by a non-English post-graduate major at Sun Yat-sen University when describing culture shock when attending the first day of classes in Holistic English. (http://chinaholisticenglish.com “First Day Student Culture Shock.” September 2009) (670 post-graduate students attending one of China’s top ten universities and representing 195 undergraduate colleges and universitiesi from every Provinceii of China.)


Once apprised of this term, the authors provided the students an opportunity to express their opinions as to the cause and effect of ME. (http://chinaholisticenglish.com “MUTE ENGLISH” October 2009) Each discussion point is preceded by at least one student comment, prompting the analysis.

Definition

Mute English

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


Mute English is a phenomenon, especially common in the People's Republic of China, where people can read and understand English as a second language but cannot speak it well. The phrase is a translation of the Chinese phrase, "哑巴英语" ("ya ba ying yu" in pinyin). The phenomenon is sometimes referred to as Dumb English.


Mute English occurs primarily due to the lack of native English speakers to emulate or practice with, particularly in a country as large as China. Efforts to mitigate Mute English in China have resulted in numerous commercial products including TEFL schools and teach-yourself courses, international exchanges, and the eagerness with which Chinese students strive to practice their English with foreign visitors.


We take serious exception to the Wikipedia rationalization for ME and suggest that it is simply a well crafted excuse and a convenient scape-goat to avoid dealing with the real causes of ME and implementing appropriate and required reforms.


In fact, the Wikipedia excuse for ME perpetuates one of the 4 Great Lies of teaching English as a foreign language in China and is pedagogically just plain incorrect.

“You can only make your English better by speaking with a native L1 English speaker.”

(Wolff 09, 4 Great Lies, Nova Science Publishers)


Just as steel sharpens steel, L2 speakers can sharpen L2 speakers.


Real causes of Mute English


CET


Patrick_Class 1

October 17th, 2009 at 10:21 am

Actually, the phenomenon of “Mute English” in China is quite a serious problem. Someone who does well in CET-6 may not speak English well. Many English Corners are also ridiculous that some people talk with each other in Chinese. Tracing it to its cause, we have little chance to speak English, and we often use English to pass the examination. So, we should try our best to build up the environment to learn English and make Mute English gone.


Sunny Class 4

October 14th, 2009 at 6:58 pm

The phenomena of “Mute English” in China is very serious. Many “good students” in English cannot communicate with others in our lives. In my opinion, this is the result of Chinese education system. Most students just study hard in listening and reading in order to get high scores, for the test usually don’t need to speaking English. I really want to have a good environment which can speak English as Chinese to learn English well.


Susan Class 1

October 15th, 2009 at 11:18 am

Mute English is a common phenomenon among Chinese students. There are two reasons. First, the education system has not established a kind of communication model. In class, the teacher is the leader and he talks a lot and a lot. However, the students may have no chances to speak out their ideas. Moreover, exams in China pay more attention to the grammar rather than the practical. I think it is the root why so many people in China can attain a very high score but can not speak English fluently and freely. Second, most of Chinese people are very focused on their face (ego or pride). So if they make some errors in one word or sentence grammar, they will feel ashamed. But I think if you can go the first step to open your mouth to speak and practice more, you can do better gradually.


Sally Class 3

October 15th, 2009 at 10:39 am

We began to study English since junior high school. From that time on, our English teacher often told us not to speak hence, “mute English”.
Yes, we all know to read it loud. But in the morning when we read aloud we find it is difficult to hear our sound in a class of 90 students when everyone tries his best to shout the English words. So we get used to mute English to concentrate on the book and memorize the words. In China, we don’t have much opportunity to practice our oral English. In the thought of some students and teachers, we learn English to pass exams, it is nothing to do with whether we speak mute English or not. If we memorize the text it is OK, nobody cares whether we sound it right. I think china has a longway to go on the way of English teaching.


John. Class 2

October 15th, 2009 at 10:35 pm

It’s true that “Mute English” is a common phenomenon in China currently, I think the problems are as follows: To begin with, there lacks the English–speaking environment. We all know that the best way to improve our English is using it frequently, but if people around you all speak Chinese, when you insist on speaking English, I think that needs courage. Furthermore, it is decided by the teaching style in our country. Teachers play a vital role in the process of our study, but we have few opportunity to speak out in the class, most of the time is just the teacher is speaking. Have been taught in this teaching style for so many years, we have gradually lost the initiative of speaking. More importantly, most of the English exams in our country do not contain oral English. In order to pass the exam smoothly, we may pay more attention on English grammar and other things which are needed in the exam, and the time we spend on oral English are accordingly reduced.


The CET examinations, much like their Imperial Examination predecessor, are more of an endurance contest than an evaluation of well rounded academic achievement. The CET national examinations have fostered their own pedagogy, methodology and teaching materials. They purportedly measure a university student’s cumulative memorized knowledge about the English language.


The importance of the CET examinations cannot be overstated because they have become the gatekeeper to higher education and even employment. (Wolff 2009, CHINA EFL: A Market Driven Model PetroChina Embraces Holistic English Program, CHINA EFL: Curriculum Reform)


Millions of students pass the requisite CET examinations every year but remain functionally illiterate, unable to produce comprehensible English.


Most English education in China is designed to prepare students to pass the CET examinations while ignoring the practical ability to use that which has been studied for 16 years.


The CET examinations are the root cause of ME.


Teachers


Pearl Class 9

October 16th, 2009 at 9:00 am · Edit

The teachers in China play more attention on teaching grammar. They think before you use a language the first thing you should do is understand it. I still remember that my English teacher taught me how to spell and use the right English words and what orders the sentences are at the beginning of learning English. But they still neglect the importance of listening and talking. Our English teachers before always emphasize on using right words and grammar. These reasons may make the unique phenomena “Mute English” appear in China. As we known, in really communication grammars and right words are beside the point. If you can make others understand what you mean, you are right. Most of English teachers in China misunderstand what is primary and what is secondary.


Susan Class 1

October 15th, 2009 at 11:18 am

Mute English is a common phenomenon among Chinese students. There are two reasons. First, the education system has not established a kind of communication model. In class, the teacher is the leader and he talks a lot and a lot. However, the students may have no chances to speak out their ideas. Moreover, exams in China pay more attention to the grammar rather than the practical. I think it is the root why so many people in China can attain a very high score but can not speak English fluently and freely.

Second, most of Chinese people are very focused on their face (ego or pride). So if they make some errors in one word or sentence grammar, they will feel ashamed. But I think if you can go the first step to open your mouth to speak and practice more, you can do better gradually.


Sally Class 3

October 15th, 2009 at 10:39 am · Edit

We began to study English since junior high school. From that time on, our English teacher often told us not to speak hence, “mute English”.
Yes, we all know to read it loud. But in the morning when we read aloud we find it is difficult to hear our sound in a class of 90 students when everyone tries his best to shout the English words. So we get used to mute English to concentrate on the book and memorize the words.
In China, we don’t have much opportunity to practice our oral English. In the thought of some students and teachers, we learn English to pass exams, it is nothing to do with whether we speak mute English or not. If we memorize the text it is OK, nobody cares whether we sound it right. I think china has a long way to go on the way of English teaching


Eric Class 4

October 15th, 2009 at 9:56 am

Mute English is a special Chinese phenomenon indeed.

There are many reasons for its happening.
Firstly, the level of learning English is evaluated by CET in China, and there is not any requirement for oral English in CET! Accordingly, the students will neglect the part of oral English. CET needs reforming!
Secondly, there are not many teachers who can speak fluent English actually, at least not enough. And many English teachers teach the students English in Chinese! How can the students learn to speak fluent English from the teachers?
At last, the students sometimes are afraid of being laughed at for his or her pronunciation.
Generally, mute English has its root in China.


John-Class one

October 15th, 2009 at 12:33 pm ·

I have learnt English for more than ten years and I have already passed the CET-6, but when I am communicating with foreigners, I still cannot understand them very well. Why!? That’s ‘mute English’. Our Chinese English teachers let us pay too much attention to English grammar. But we all know language came easier than the grammar. So if we learn grammar instead of language, there will be some difficulty in understanding what foreigners say.


Of the one million plus (1,000,000,000 +) Chinese teachers of English less than 10% actually teach English in the target language, ENGLISH. They stand in front of their students and utter one of the 4 Great Lies, “You must master English.” This is said in mandarin, not in English. (Qiang, Wolff, Teng 2009, China EFL: Holistic English: The Revolution Has Begun, but the Long March Lies Ahead, CHINA EFL: Curriculum Reform)


There are two reasons for this: First classroom instruction to pass CET does not require instruction in English. Second, the Chinese teachers’ English is so poor it is impossible for them to teach in the target language, ENGLISH. They have not come close to acquiring a functional English let alone “master English,” one of the 4 Great Lies.


Foreign teachers recruited to teach oral English are not required to have any degree in English, linguistics, 2nd language acquisition or even education. They are not even required to have any teaching experience. The foreign teacher is viewed as more of an entertainer, (a white monkey), than a real teacher. Properly educated and experienced foreign teachers are not required because their oral English course does not contribute to the students’ ability to pass the CET examinations. (Qiang/Wolff 2009, China EFL: Foreign Teacher Needed, Journal of Education Research; Qiang/Wolff 2003 China ESL: An Industry Run A Muck?, Progress in Education; Qiang/Wolff 2006, China EFL: The Unqualified, Teaching (sic) the Unmotivated, in a Hostile Environment, Frontiers in Education)


Teaching materials


Sally Class 3

October 15th, 2009 at 10:39 am

We began to study English since junior high school. From that time on, our English teacher often told us not to speak hence, “mute English”.
Yes, we all know to read it loud. But in the morning when we read aloud we find it is difficult to hear our sound in a class of 90 students when everyone tries his best to shout the English words. So we get used to mute English to concentrate on the book and memorize the words. In China, we don’t have much opportunity to practice our oral English. In the thought of some students and teachers, we learn English to pass exams, it is nothing to do with whether we speak mute English or not. If we memorize the text it is OK, nobody cares whether we sound it right. I think China has a long way to go on the way of English teaching


Jane Class 6

October 14th, 2009 at 9:37 am

English is an important tool to communicate with foreigners and the whole world. There are three abilities in learning English: listening, speaking and reading. However, English teachers in China always put emphasis on listening and reading while ingnoring speaking because they think it’s not related with the CET examinations.


Teaching materials for Chinese teachers of English are primarily limited to grammar and language rules. Oral English teaching materials contain little more than set phrase memorization exercises. (Qiang, Teng, Gregory, Wolff 2004, Can You Get a First Class Education At a Third Tier College In China?, Progress in Education; Wolff 2009 A New Chinese Puzzle, Nova Science Publications)


Teaching materials for the “foreign experts” are either the set phrase books utilized by the Chinese teachers, whatever materials are brought from the home country including guitar, or the “foreign expert” is instructed to just chat with the students.


There are no 2nd language acquisition teaching materials. CET does not even pretend to measure actual 2nd language acquisition.


No English speaking environment


Patrick_Class 1

October 17th, 2009 at 10:21 am · Edit

Actually, the phenomenon of “Mute English” in China is quite a serious problem. Someone who does well in CET-6 may not speak English well. Many English Corners are also ridiculous that some people talk with each other in Chinese. Tracing it to its cause, we have little chance to speak English, and we often use English to pass the examination. So, we should try our best to build up the environment to learn English and make Mute English gone.


Ada Class 3

October 15th, 2009 at 1:40 pm

I think there are three reasons.


1) it is well known that both teachers and students ignore the oral training. The direct consequence is that our pronunciation is not pure; our expression is not proper and we always consider speaking English as writing an essay therefore

we think again and again before speaking.
2) it may be a hidden reason like the character and traits of the person who speaks English. For instance, some students are obtuse, introverted and even don’t express themselves in Chinese. So when it comes to English, it will be more difficult.
3) we always complain about the lack of language environment. But beyond the language environment is our intention and view. We study English just for passing the variety of exams and speaking English in foreign countries. We thought it is not necessary to speak English in China. Maybe that’s why we only complain but don’t take action.


Chinese colleges and universities provide some extra-curricular English speaking activities but they do not provide the slightest semblance of an English speaking environment. (Qiang/Wolff 2009, CHINA EFL: English Corner; Teaching EFL in China: What Every Foreign Teacher Should Know Before They Go; (Qiang/Wolff 2008, China EFL: Why Chinese Universities do not Provide an English Speaking Environment, Education in China – 21st Century Issues and Challenges; Wolff 2009, CHINA EFL: A Market Driven Model PetroChina Embraces Holistic English Program, CHINA EFL: Curriculum Reform)


Chinese teachers of English actually discourage the use of oral English in class because it does not help the student with the CET examinations and it constitutes a challenge to the teacher’s poor English, which could cause the teacher loss of face.


Effects of Mute English


Van Class 3

October 15th, 2009 at 10:42 am · Edit

Just one month ago, I am a student of ‘mute English’. Because I think that it is hard to speak English with others, not only because my pronunciation is too bad but also my terrible listening. But today I don’t care about those bad things. Now I can communicate with anybody in English without thinking about my awful pronunciation, it makes me feel so good. So I hate my prior experience of English studying


Mike class-two

October 15th, 2009 at 8:05 pm · Edit

“Mute English”, it sounds interesting but exists indeed among us. English is a language to communicate with each other, but sometimes it is only a subject, we recite it only to pass the exam and ignore its real use at the same time. Maybe we are able to get good marks in the examination, but can’t speak it fluently. Maybe this is a failure of our English education. And maybe it is highly time for each of us to change the situation for the better. Great emphasis should be placed on listening and speaking. After all, English is a real language rather than a subject.


Bruce 9

October 16th, 2009 at 12:27 pm

Each teacher has his own way of teaching method; I think I can’t find any way to realize it good or bad. I still remembered that when I came to the English class in my first time, I could hardly know what the teacher said, although she only gave me some simple words. After all, it is my first time to touch with English. My first English concentrated on the holding of the words. With the process of the study, grammar has come to my sight. It seems so dull and difficult, which even made me lose the interest. .Fortunately I didn’t give up, and with my hard work and others’ help, I held up.
When my college began, every thing has changed. I found I had a aim, which encourage me to make my speaking, listening, writing and reading skill better. Most importantly, with the help of the Holistic English professor, I am bound to make a big progress for I am in a good English speaking environment.


The most immediate and serious effect of ME is that university freshmen who have no intrinsic motivation, no self-confidence, no self-discipline, no autonomous learning skills and lack creative thinking ability. The following graph demonstrates how freshmen from 6 universities (Guangxi University, Shenyang Normal University, Yang En University, Xinyang Agricultural College, Xinyang Normal University, Xinyang Vocational College)

in 4 provinces (Fujian, Henan, Guangxi, Liaoning) made improvement and progress in 3 of these areas through a new paradigm for oral English. (Qiang, Wolff, Teng 2009,China EFL: Holistic English: The Revolution Has Begun, but the Long March Lies Ahead, CHINA EFL: Curriculum Reform)




Graph 1


After four years of undergraduate university, post-graduate students at one of China’s top ten universities are required to endure another year of English learning. However, in the Spring term 2009, 485 post-graduate non-English majors were placed in 12 Holistic English classes. Even as post-graduate students, they were lacking in intrinsic motivation, self-confidence, self-discipline, autonomous learning skills and lacked creative thinking ability. The following graph indicates their growth and development in these areas under the new paradigm.



Graph 2


The following graph demonstrates how post-graduate students in the traditional oral English classes fared poorly in these same areas.




Graph 3


Graph 2 and 3 are taken from HOLISTIC ENGLISH, A Revolution – Not an Evolution, Wong Zhe and Martin Wolff, Sun Yat-sen University, Niu Qiang, Changchun University

(2009) (In Peer Review)

Solution

Lively Class 2

October 17th, 2009 at 5:40 pm

Well, in China, people are good at a certain skill cause that it’s important and a certain skill is important cause that it is needed. For a common student who only wants to pass the exams, English is important, of cause. If one can’t pass English, he will not graduate. How can a student pass an English exam? The answer is good at reading and writing in English. The oral English is no needed. So the phenomena called “Mute English” turns up. But there are some students who want to go abroad or work with the foreigners. They know that speaking English is very important for them because that they really need it in future. That is why you can still find some Chinese who speak English fluently. If every student and teacher can figure out that English speaking is needed for everyone, there will be no “Mute English” in China.


Angelina class 02

October 18th, 2009 at 9:45 am

Nowadays, “Mute English” has become a serious problem among us. We have learned English for a long time, but most of us can’t communicate well with others in English. In addition, there are still many other students who can understand every word of a article, but fail to read them out fluently and correctly. I think it is high time that we paid more attention to this “Mute English”. Nobody but we ourselves could change this situation. Firstly, we should practice the pronunciation more and more. Secondly, we should not be afraid of losing face. Last but not least, we also should pay attention to the difference between oral language and written language. Only through these ways can we avoid “Mute English” and speak English fluently.


Fred Class 8

October 14th, 2009 at 9:11 pm

I think the most important reason that results in “mute English” in China is there is no oral English exam in China. As a result, no teachers and students would “waste time” practicing oral English. In China, the teachers and student expend too much time on learning English grammar, but too little time on opening their mouths to speak English. So I believe that if we China education department add the oral English exam in primary school and middle school, that will be a great boost to solve this problem. Besides, most Chinese students are shy of speaking English which may be because they have been engaging in this habit of English study in the mute mode for such a long time


Eric Class 4

October 15th, 2009 at 9:56 am

Mute English is a special Chinese phenomenon indeed.

There are many reasons for its happening.
Firstly, the level of learning English is evaluated by CET in China, and there is not any requirement for oral English in CET! Accordingly, the students will neglect the part of oral English. CET needs reforming!
Secondly, there are not many teachers who can speak fluent English actually, at least not enough. And many English teachers teach the students English in Chinese! How can the students learn to speak fluent English from the teachers?
At last, the students sometimes are afraid of being laughed at for his or her pronunciation.
Generally, mute English has its root in China.


The simple answer is TRUE REFORM instead of the current trend to tweek that which currently exists, including adding something referred to as an oral component to CET. CET is predicated upon a completely inadequate and inappropriate foundation.

True reform requires a new sustainable foundation based upon practical English language needs in the employment marketplace instead of meaningless philosophical educational accomplishments. (Wolff 2009, CHINA EFL: A Market Driven Model PetroChina Embraces Holistic English Program, CHINA EFL: Curriculum Reform)

Language learning needs to be converted and transformed into language acquisition.

Conclusion


Angellu Class 1

October 14th, 2009 at 7:27 pm

Actually, a language is a system for encoding and decoding information. We exchange information through listening, speaking, reading and writing. While in our country, when we learn English or other foreign languages, we often focus on reading and writing. Because only these two are important things for us to pass examinations and get a better education and job. On the other hand, we have little chance to speak English, for most of us are used to speaking Chinese and this is instinctive for us. So unless it is necessary, we rarely talk in English. As a result of that, MUTE ENGLISH become a quite common phenomenon in China.


So long as CET is the gatekeeper for university graduation and post-graduation employment, China will continue to teach MUTE ENGLISH and produce functional illiterates.


Chinese scholars of English Linguistics have remained largely silent and abdicated their responsibility to fashion language policy while allowing those preparing and profiting

from the CET tests to have a free rein. (Qiang/Wolff 2005, Linguistic Failures, English Today)


In fact we have been speaking out and writing against ME since 2002 but were unaware of the common terminology coined and applied by Chinese students to this failed EFL curriculum.


i The students represent the following 195 undergraduate institutions of higher learning:

Agricultural University of Hebei, Anhui Normal University, Anhui University, Anyang Normal University, Anyang Normal Teachers University, Beijing Normal University, Beijing Normal University Zuhai Campus, Binzhou University, Central China Agriculture University, Central China Normal University, Central South University of Forestry and Technology, Central South University, Changchun Normal University, Changsha University, Changsha University of Science and Technology, Chengdu University of Technology, China Agriculture University, China Pharmaceutical University, China University of Geosciences, China West Normal University, Chongqing Normal University, Chongqing Technology and Business University, Chongqing University of Post and Telecommunications, Dalian University of Technology Dalian Jiaotong University, Daqing Petroleum Institute, Dezhou University, East China Institute of Technology, East China Normal University, East China Institute of Technology, Foshan University, Fujian Normal University, Gannan Normal University, Guangdong College of Pharmacy, Guangdong Ocean University, Guangzhou University, Guangdong University of Technology, Guangdong University of Business Study Guangdong University of Technology, Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine, Guangdong University of Technology, Guangxi Normal University, Guilin University of Technology, Guiyang College of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Guizhou University, Guizhou College of Finance and Economics, Hainan Normal University, Hainan University, Harbin Engineering University, Harbin Normal University, Hebei University of Science and Technology, Hebei Normal University, Hefei University, Hefei University of Technology, Heilongjiang University, Henan Institute of Science and Technology, Henan Normal University, Henan University, Henan College Of Science And Technology, Henan University of Technology, Hengyang Normal University, Hohai University, Huaibei Coal Industry Teachers College, Huanggang Normal University, Huangshan College, Huangshan University, Huazhong Agricultural University, Huazhong Normal University, Huangzhong Agricultural University, Hubei Normal University, Hubei University of Technology, Hunan Agriculture University, Hunan City University, Hunan Normal University, Hunan University of Arts and Science, Hunan University of Chinese Medicine, Hunan University, Hunan University of Science and Technology, Hunan University, Inner Mongolia University, Jiangxi Agricultural University, Jiangxi Normal University, Jiangxi Science & Technology Normal University, Jiangsu University, Jiaying University, Jiamusi University, Jiliang University, Jilin University, Jimei University, Jinan University, Jiujiang University, Jishou University, JYU University, Liaoning Normal University, Liaoning University, Lanzhou University, Leshan Normal University, Liaocheng University, Liaoningshihua University, Linyi Normal University, Linyi University, Luoyang Normal University, Nanchang University, Nanchang Hang Kong University, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing University, Neijiang Teachers' College, Nankai University, Northeast Agriculture University, Northeast Forest University, Northeast Normal University, Northeastern University, North University of China, North West Normal University, Northwest University, Northwest University of Politics and Law, Northwest A & F University, Ocean University of China, Peking University, Pingdingshan University, Quanzhou Normal University, Qingdao Agricultural University, Qingdao University, Qingdao Technological University, Qufu Normal University, Qiannan Normal College for Nationalities, Shanxi Agriculture University, Shanxi Datong University, Shaanxi Normal University, Shandong Agricultural University, Shandong Normal University, Shandong University of Technology, Shandong University of Science and Technology, Shandong University, Shaoxing University, Shaoyang College, Shangqiu Normal University, Shanxi Datong University, Shanxi Normal University, Shanxi University, Shenyang Agricultural University, Shenyang Pharmaceutical University, Shenzhen University, Shijiazhuang University Of Economics, Sichuan Agricultural University, Sichuan Normal University, South Central University for Nationalities, South China Agriculture University, South China Normal University, South China University of Technology, Southeast University, Southwest Forestry College, Southwest Jiaotong University, Southwest Normal University, Southwest University for Nationalities, Southwest University of Science and Technology, Sun Yat-sen University, Taiyuan Normal University, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Three Gorges University, Tianjin University of Technology, Tianjin Normal University, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, University of Jinan , University of South China, Weifang Medical College, Weinan Normal University, Wenzhou University, Wuhan University, Wuhan University of Technology, Xiangnan University, Xiangtan University, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xidian University, Xinzhou Teachers University, Xinjiang University, Xinyang Normal University, Xuchang University, Yangcheng Normal University, Yanshan University, Yantai University, Yantai Normal University, Yangtzeu University, Yunnan University, Yuxi Normal University, Zhejiang University, Zhejiang Chinese Medical University, Zhejiang Forestry University, Zhengzhou Normal University, Zhengzhou University, Zunyi Medical College

ii The students represent the following provinces:

Anhui, Chongqing, Fujian, Guangdong, Gansu, Guangxi, Guizhou, Hebei, Heilongjiang, Henan Hong Kong, Hubei, Hunan, Inner Mongolia, Jiangsu, Jiangxi, Jilin, Liaoning, Ningxia, Shanghai, Shandong, Shanxi, Shaanxi, Sichuan, Tianjin, Xinjiang, Yunnan, Zhejiang


References


Qiang, Wolff, Teng (2009),China EFL: Holistic English: The Revolution Has Begun, but the Long March Lies Ahead, CHINA EFL: Curriculum Reform


Qiang/Wolff (2009), China EFL: Foreign Teacher Needed, Journal of Education Research


Qiang/Wolff (2003) China ESL: An Industry Run A Muck?, Progress in Education


Qiang/Wolff (2005), Linguistic Failures, English Today


Qiang/Wolff (2006), China EFL: The Unqualified, Teaching (sic) the Unmotivated, in a Hostile Environment, Frontiers in Education


Qiang/Wolff 2008, China EFL: Why Chinese Universities do not Provide an English Speaking Environment, Education in China – 21st Century Issues and Challenges


Qiang/Wolff 2009, China EFL: Foreign Teacher Needed, Journal of Education Research


Qiang/Wolff 2009, CHINA EFL: English Corner; Teaching EFL in China: What Every Foreign Teacher Should Know Before They Go


Wong, Wolff, Qiang (2009) HOLISTIC ENGLISH, A Revolution – Not an Evolution, Nova Science Publishers


Wolff (2009) A New Chinese Puzzle, Nova Science Publications


Wolff (2009), CHINA EFL: A Market Driven Model PetroChina Embraces Holistic English Program, CHINA EFL: Curriculum Reform


Wolff (2009), 4 Great Lies, Nova Science Publishers


The Pronunciation course can be viewed here.



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China efl: Mute English. Cet – the Bane of efl acquisition in China icon检索词:(ocean univ china or ocean univ qingdao or china ocean univ or qingdao ocean univ) and入库年份=2010

China efl: Mute English. Cet – the Bane of efl acquisition in China icon检索词:(ocean univ china or ocean univ qingdao or china ocean univ or qingdao ocean univ) and入库年份=2009

China efl: Mute English. Cet – the Bane of efl acquisition in China iconUnderstanding china

China efl: Mute English. Cet – the Bane of efl acquisition in China iconChina Cooperation Aff

China efl: Mute English. Cet – the Bane of efl acquisition in China iconUk and china: partners in business


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